EXCELLENT EMPLOYEES REWARDED AT POINT GRACE RESORT

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 29 Dec 2014 – Point Grace recognizing and rewarding excellence of its staff just before Christmas; Margaret of the Housekeeping Department was presented the Employee of the Month prize by General Manager of Point Grace, Beverly Williams. “Obviously she has been very helpful in whatever it is that she does and she loves her work and so she is always trying to make things nice, and she likes to fix our flowers and I think that is one of the reasons why she got it.”Margaret says this recognition motivates her. “I feel so good, it make me think to work harder to try to do my best.”Renee of the Maintenance received the certificate of Excellence. “I say thank you to the staff for thinking about this, and I feel so well today. We are in the Christmastime, this makes me feel better.” Many Nominations for TCI Hotels in World Travel Awards Gala Recommended for you ‘Sex’ a main subject tonight at Point Grace sponsored event Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:beverly williams, employee, excellence, point grace Provo Road Runners contest challenging residents to beat the bulgelast_img read more

This Zambian nurse swapped 5000 babies in 12 years just for fun

first_imgElizabeth Bwalya MwewatwitterA nurse’s shocking confession has revealed that she had swapped nearly 5,000 babies just for fun while working at University Teaching Hospital in Zambia.Elizabeth Bwalya Mwewa, a former nurse at the UTH, had this odious revelation that she had swapped over 5,000 babies between 1983 and 1995. She disclosed this as she is suffering from terminal cancer and doesn’t want to rot in hell in the afterlife. The news has created quite an uproar in social media after it went viral.”I have terminal cancer and I know I will be dying soon. I wish to confess my sins before God and before all the affected people especially those who were giving birth at UTH during my service. I have found God. I’m now born again. I have nothing to hide, in the 12 years I worked in the maternity ward at UTH, I swapped close to 5,000 babies,” Elizabeth said.Elizabeth added that if anyone’s born between 1983 and 1995, the chances are that their parents might not be their true biological parents as she had developed a habit of swapping babies just for fun.”So, take a good look at your siblings, if for example everyone is light and you are darkie… you are that child and I am really sorry for that”, she said.She further said that she has sinned against God and was the reason behind the divorce of many faithful couples after going for DNA tests. She said that she was being used by a demon for doing such heinous crime.”I have caused many mothers to breastfeed children who are not theirs biologically. I don’t want to go to Hell for that, I’m really sorry I have sinned a lot. Please forgive me,” she added.However, the initial investigation revealed that there is no midwife by her name under the General Nursing Council of Zambia and no nurse by that name had ever existed or worked at UTH.last_img read more

FireEyes Global DNS Hijacking Campaign suspects Iranianbased group as the prime source

first_imgFireEye, a US cybersecurity firm, have disclosed details about their DNS hijacking campaign. In their recent report, the company shared that they have identified huge DNS hijacking affecting multiple domains belonging to government, telecommunications and internet infrastructure entities across the Middle East and North Africa, Europe and North America. FireEye analysts believe an Iranian-based group is the source behind these attacks, although they do not have a definitive proof. The analysts also said that “they have been tracking this activity for several months, mapping and understanding the innovative tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) deployed by the attacker”. The FireEye Intelligence team has also identified an access from Iranian IPs to machines used to intercept, record and forward network traffic. The team also mentions that these IP addresses were previously observed during the response to an intrusion attributed to Iranian cyber espionage actors. The FireEye report highlights three different techniques used to conduct these attacks. Techniques to manipulate the DNS records and enable victim compromises 1. Altering DNS A Records Source: FireEye Here the attackers first logged into a proxy box used to conduct non-attributed browsing and as a jumpbox to other infrastructure. The attacker then logs into the DNS provider’s administration panel, utilising previously compromised credentials. Attackers change the DNS records for victim’s mail server in order to redirect it to their own mail server. They have used Let’s Encrypt certificates to support HTTPS traffic, and a load balancer to redirect victims back to the real email server after they’ve collected login credentials from victims on their shadow server. The username, password and domain credentials are harvested and stored. 2. Altering DNS NS Records Source: FireEye This technique is the same as the previous one. However, here the attacker exploits a previously compromised registrar or ccTLD. 3. A DNS Redirector Source: FireEye This technique is a conjunction of the previous two. The DNS Redirector is an attacker operations box which responds to DNS requests. Here, if the domain is from inside the company, OP2 responds with an attacker-controlled IP address, and the user is re-directed to the attacker-controlled infrastructure. Analysts said that a large number of organizations have been affected by this pattern of DNS record manipulation and fraudulent SSL certificates. These include telecoms and ISP providers, internet infrastructure providers, government and sensitive commercial entities. According to FireEye report, “While the precise mechanism by which the DNS records were changed is unknown, we believe that at least some records were changed by compromising a victim’s domain registrar account.” To know more about this news in detail, read the FireEye report. Read Next FireEye reports North Korean state sponsored hacking group, APT38 is targeting financial institutions Reddit posts an update to the FireEye’s report on suspected Iranian influence operation Justice Department’s indictment report claims Chinese hackersbreached business and government networklast_img read more

How to translate OpenQASM programs in IBX QX into quantum scores Tutorial

first_imgOpen Quantum Assembly Language (OpenQASM, pronounced open kazm) is a custom programming language designed specifically to minimally describe quantum circuits. In this tutorial, we will learn how to translate OpenQASM programs into quantum scores with IBM QX. We will also look at representing quantum scores in OpenQASM 2.0 programs. You will need a modern web browser and the ability to sign into IBM QX This tutorial is an excerpt taken from the book ‘Mastering Quantum Computing with IBM QX’ written by  Dr. Christine Corbett Moran. The book explores quantum computing by implementing quantum programs on IBM QX, helping you be at the forefront of the next revolution in computation. The Quantum Composer is a tool to specify quantum programs graphically, and many SDKs and APIs exist to write compute code to represent a quantum program in a modern language ( Python being a common choice). Like the Quantum Composer, OpenQASM a higher-level language for specifying quantum programs than computer code, but unlike the Quantum Composer, it is neither graphical nor user interface specific, so it can be much easier to specify longer programs that can be directly copied into the many quantum simulators or into IBM QX for use. The Quantum Composer can take as input, programs in OpenQASM, and translate them into the graphical view. Likewise, for every program specified in the Quantum Composer it is easy to access the equivalent in OpenQASM within the IBM QX user interface. OpenQASM is similar in syntax to C: Comments are one per line and begin with // White space isn’t important Case is important Every line in the program must end in a semicolon ; Additionally, the following points apply: Every program must begin with OPENQASM 2.0; (IBM QX at the time of writing uses version 2.0, but this can be updated to whichever version of OpenQASM you are using). When working with IBM QX, the include “qelib1.inc”; header must be given. Any other file can be included with the same syntax; what OpenQASM does is simply copies the content of the file at the location of include. The path to the file is a relative path from the current program. Reading and writing OpenQASM 2.0 programs for the IBM QX will involve the following operations: Include header include “qelib1.inc”; Declaring a quantum register (qregname is any name you choose for the quantum register) qreg qregname[k]; Referencing a quantum register qregname[i]; Declaring a classical register (cregname is any name you choose for the quantum register) creg cregname[k]; Referencing a classical register cregname[i]; One-qubit gate list, available with inclusion of qelib1.inc on IBM QX h, t, tdg, s, sdg, x, y, z, id One-qubit gate action syntax gate q[i]; Two-qubit CNOT gate list, available with inclusion of qelib1.inc on IBM QX cx Two-qubit CNOT gate action (control and target both qubits in a previously declared quantum register) cnot control, target; Measurement operations available measure, bloch Measurement operation action syntax measure q[i] -> c[j]; bloch q[i] -> c[j]; Barrier operation (args are a comma-separated list of qubits) barrier args; Primitive gates (OpenQASM standard but not used on IBM QX) CX, U We will now learn reading OpenQASM programs and translating them into quantum scores as well as translating quantum scores to OpenQASM programs. Note that i and j are integer counters, starting at 0, which specifies which qubit/bit in the quantum or classical register the program would like to reference; k is an integer counter greater than 0 which specifies the size of a classical or quantum register at declaration. Translating OpenQASM programs into quantum scores In this tutorial, we will translate OpenQASM programs into quantum scores by hand to practice, reading OpenQASM code. OpenQASM to negate one qubit Consider the following program: OPENQASM 2.0;include “qelib1.inc”;qreg q[1];x q[0]; The following lines are the standard headers for working with IBM QX: OPENQASM 2.0;include “qelib1.inc”; Then the following line declares a quantum register of size one named q: qreg q[1]; Quantum registers are automatically initialized to contain |”0″>. Finally, the next line operates the X gate on the first (and only) qubit in the q quantum register: x q[0]; Putting this all together, we can create the following equivalent quantum score: OpenQASM to apply gates to two qubits, and measure the first qubit Next, consider the OpenQASM program: OPENQASM 2.0;include “qelib1.inc”;qreg q[2];creg c[1];x q[0];y q[0];z q[0];s q[1];measure q[0] -> c[0]; The first two preceding lines are the standard header to declare a program and OpenQASM program and the standard import header to interface with the IBM QX. The next two lines declare a quantum register of two qubits initialized to |”00″> and a classical register of one bit initialized to 0: qreg q[2];creg c[1]; The next three lines apply gates, in order, to the first qubit in the q quantum register: x q[0];y q[0];z q[0]; The next line applies a gate to the second qubit in the q quantum register: s q[1]; And the final line measures the first qubit in the q quantum register and places the result in the first (and only) bit in the c classical register: measure q[0] -> c[0]; Putting this all together, we can create the following equivalent quantum score: Representing quantum scores in OpenQASM 2.0 programs Here is an example of writing an OpenQASM 2.0 program from a quantum score. I have broken it down into columns from top to bottom of the score for clarity and annotated these in the diagram by indicating column numbers in orange. Here’s the circuit illustrating the reversibility of quantum computations: Let’s dissect the OpenQASM that generates this circuit. The first lines are, as usual, the headers, indicating the code is OpenQASM and that we will be using the standard IBM QX header: OPENQASM 2.0;include “qelib1.inc”; The next lines declare a quantum register named q of 5 qubits  initialized to |”00000″> and a classical register name c of 5 bits initialized to 00000: // declare the quantum and classical registers we will useqreg q[5];creg c[5]; The next lines will go column by column in the circuit diagram, creating the code for each column in order. We will start with the first column: The first column we can see only contains a CNOT gate, with its control qubit being the third qubit in the q quantum register, q[2] and the target qubit being the second qubit in the q quantum register, q[1]. Looking up the OpenQASM syntax for the CNOT gate in the table in the previous section, we see that it is cnot control, target; which means that the first column will be coded as: //column 1cx q[2],q[1]; Next, we will move to the second column, which has a number of gates specified. The code for the second column is: //column2x q[1];h q[2];s q[3];y q[4]; Each successive column should now be straightforward to encode from looking at the quantum score in OpenQASM. The full program is as follows: OPENQASM 2.0;include “qelib1.inc”;// declare the quantum and classical registers we will useqreg q[5];creg c[5];//column 1cx q[2],q[1];//column2x q[1];h q[2];s q[3];y q[4];//column 3t q[2];z q[3];//column 4tdg q[2];z q[3];//column 5x q[1];h q[2];sdg q[3];y q[4];// column 6cx q[2],q[1];// column 7measure q[0] -> c[0];// column 8measure q[1] -> c[1];// column 9measure q[2] -> c[2];// column 10measure q[3] -> c[3];// column 11measure q[4] -> c[4]; The previous code exactly reproduced the quantum score as depicted, but we could make several quantum scores, which are equivalent (and thus several variations on the OpenQASM program that are equivalent), as we saw in previous sections. Here are a couple of things to keep in mind: Each column could be in any order, for example, column 3 could be: t q[2];z q[3]; Or it could be: z q[3];tdg q[2]; In addition, any gate operating on a qubit in any column where there is no gate in the previous column on the qubit can be moved to the previous column, without affecting the computation. In this article, we learned how to translate OpenQASM programs in IBX QX into quantum scores. We also looked at Representing quantum scores in OpenQASM 2.0 programs. If you want to learn other concepts and principles of Quantum Computing with IBM QX, be sure to check out the book ‘Mastering Quantum Computing with IBM QX’. Read Next Quantum computing, edge analytics, and meta-learning: key trends in data science and big data in 2019 Did quantum computing just take a quantum leap? A two-qubit chip by UK researchers makes quantum entanglement possible Quantum Computing is poised to take a quantum leap with industries and governments on its sidelast_img read more