Mermaid Beach house values experience “extraordinary growth”

first_imgHedges Ave, Mermaid Beach. Picture: Regi VargheseThat’s an average jump of 8.7 per cent a year and well above Brisbane’s 5.9 per cent.Units in Paradise Point took second position, with the median apartment price increasing from$111,500 to $701,000, or 7.6 per cent annually.Aussie CEO James Symond said it wasn’t a surprise to see suburbs with strong demand from buyers on the Gold Coast performing better than Brisbane over the long term.As well as holding the record sale price for the Gold Coast with a $27 million sale in 2008, Mermaid Beach also holds the highest sale this year. 69 Seagull Ave, Mermaid Beach is on the market.Ross and Megan Jurisich are selling their Mermaid Beach mansion on Seagull Ave but are moving to another property in the suburb because they love the area so much.“We’ve been here just over 12 months and we’ve been in the neighbourhood for 10 years,” Mr Jurisich said.He said there were a number of reasons they loved the area, including the friendly neighbourhood and proximity to restaurants, cafes, bars and the beach.“We’re a stones throw to arguably one of the best beaches in the world,” Mr Jurisich said. House values in Mermaid Beach have jumped from $195,000 to $1.56 million over the past 25 years. Picture: Regi VargheseIF you bought a house in Mermaid Beach 25 years ago chances are your property is worth seven times more than what you paid for it.The Aussie/CoreLogic 25 years of housing trends report found Mermaid Beach experienced “extraordinary growth” in its median house price from $195,000 to $1.56 million over the past 25 years. People enjoy a swim on the beach, Mermaid Beach, Gold Coast. Picture: Regi Varghese“It just offers so much from a lifestyle perspective — it has a central location, is close to restaurants, private schools, shopping centres and the airport.“We are seeing fewer homes come to market and there’s lack of supply which is likely to contribute to the growth trend over the next 25 years.”Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:15Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:15 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p270p270p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenThe Gold Coast has grown up02:15Luke Henderson of John Henderson Professionals Mermaid Beach shared a similar view and predicted future growth to be boosted by the light rail expansion through the suburb.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa16 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago“We’ve still got a lot of growth in this current market,” Mr Henderson said.“I think the light rail will be a big drawcard here.” MEGA SALES MAKES COAST’S TOP 10 NEW APARTMENT SALES AT 12 MONTH HIGH center_img A property along Hedges Avenue in Mermaid Beach, Gold Coast. Picture: Regi VargheseThat records belongs to a beachfront house at 103-105 Hedges Ave that changed hands for $11.6 million in April through agent Michael Kollosche of Kollosche Prestige Properties.Mr Kollosche said the suburb’s appeal came down to the lifestyle it offered residents.“Mermaid Beach, unlike all of the other beachside suburbs does not have the high-rise zoning, which keeps it like a community village,” Mr Kollosche said. Ross and Megan Jurisich are selling their Mermaid Beach mansion on Seagull Ave. Gold Coast’s top 10 suburbs for value growth Suburb, 1993 median price, 2018 median price, total change in median over 25 years Mermaid Beach (houses), $195,000, $1.56 million, 700%Paradise Point (units), $111.500, $701,000, 528%Coolangatta (houses), $135,750, $835,000, 515%Burleigh Heads (houses), $141,000, $830,000, 488%Palm Beach (houses), 143,500, $820,000, 471%Miami (houses), $135,500, $770,000, 468%Paradise Point (houses), $181,100, $1.023 million, 465%Helensvale (units), $195,000, $1.1 million, 464%Broadbeach Waters (houses), $195,000, $1.1 million, 464%Hope Island (houses), $121,400, 685,000, 463% Source: Aussie/CoreLogic 25 years of housing trends reportlast_img read more

Three family members drown as bridge collapses in Bihar

first_imgA shocking incident, in which three people were feared drowned after a bridge connecting a village collapsed, was recorded on camera in Bihar’s Araria district.Incessant rains in Bihar for the past few weeks have created a flood-like situation in several areas. The flood fury has thrown normal life out of gear in the State.The video shows a bridge collapsing when a mother tries to cross it with her two children.last_img

Canadian – Bahamian Friendship Celebrated in Treelighting

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNew Providence, Bahamas, December 12, 2016 – Last weekend the Botanical Gardens lit up with holiday cheer at the opening of its annual Christmas Village.  The center of the celebrations was the lighting of a soaring, twenty-foot tall Christmas tree, donated by The Canadian Cultural Committee, with assistance from CIBC FirstCaribbean.The tree is a gift from the Canadian community to the people of the Bahamas to symbolize the longstanding friendship between the two Commonwealth countries. The Canadian community in The Bahamas is large and longstanding and hundreds of Bahamian students are educated in Canada each year. The annual tree-giving tradition has been celebrated for over four decades, and according to Peter Goudie, President of the Canadian Cultural Committee, “is our way of saying thank you to the Bahamian people.”For the past four years, CIBC FirstCaribbean has helped to defray cost of the gargantuan tree with a donation to the Canadian Cultural Committee. Mr. Goudie states that this too is an important symbol.  “CIBC FirstCaribbean, as both a Canadian and a Caribbean bank, is in its own way a representation of the friendship between Canada and the entire region,” said Mr. Goudie.  “Canadian affiliate banks like CIBC FirstCaribbean have a long and rich history here. We thank them for their support in this annual event.”The tree was lit and presented by Mr. Goudie at a ceremony at The Botanical Gardens on Saturday, December 10.  Senator Gregory Burrows symbolically accepted the tree on behalf of the Bahamian Government and people.CAPTION: Peter Goudie of the Canadian Cultural Committee accepts a donation cheque from Lorraine Johnson, Branch Manager at CIBC FirstCaribbean Bay Street Branch. Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDTcenter_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews #MagneticMediaNews The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more

Ballentine Offers Forceful Defense of Pentagons BRAC Request

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Defending the administration’s request for a BRAC round in 2019 at last week’s hearing of the House Military Construction Appropriations Subcommittee was left to Miranda Ballentine, assistant secretary of the Air Force for installations, environment and energy, who took on lawmakers’ past concerns about the economic harm borne by defense communities, implementation costs and the prospect that surge capacity could be shortchanged following a future round.But first Ballentine pointed out that 30 percent of the service’s infrastructure is excess, making a new round of base closures urgent.“Since the Gulf War, we’ve reduced combat-coded fighter squadrons from 134 to 55. That’s a nearly 60 percent reduction. Yet all BRACs in that time period have only reduced U.S. bases by about 15 percent,” she said.“Since BRAC 2005, the Air Force has thousands fewer personnel and hundreds fewer aircraft, yet we have not closed a single installation in the United States,” Ballentine noted.Later, she clarified that the excess capacity estimate is an average of multiple scenarios for the Air Force’s size.“We’ve run the numbers a number of different ways, looking at various force structures. And it ranges anywhere from 28 to 34, depending on which force structure you use,” Ballentine said.To assuage Congress’ concern about the economic blow host communities suffer following a base closure, Ballentine pointed out that 92 percent of respondents to an instant poll taken during last year’s Defense Communities National Summit said they believe the status quo — with reduced manning levels and declining funding for installations — is worse for communities than holding a BRAC round.“Without BRAC, the Air Force will be forced to continue to spread out our airmen and our aircraft. And many communities will continue to suffer from the economic detriment of hollowed-out bases without the economic support that only BRAC legislation allows,” she told the panel.To respond to lawmakers’ concern that the investment required to carry out a BRAC round is not justified by its savings, Ballentine highlighted the Air Force’s $2.9 billion annual savings from the first five base closure rounds.“The results of previous BRAC efforts for the Air Force are really staggering,” she said.Finally, Ballentine pointed out that officials have no intention of shedding infrastructure that may be needed to support future mission needs.“Through five previous rounds of BRAC and numerous force structure changes, we’ve never dipped below 20 percent excess infrastructure capacity. We’ve always left and we always will leave room for future maneuvering,” she said.Later, Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for installations, energy and environment, argued that a new round of base closures is the best way to restore cuts to the services’ military construction budgets over the past several years.“The ability to catch up is called BRAC,” Hammack said in response to a question from Subcommittee Chairman Charlie Dent (R-Pa.). “The ability to catch up is the ability for us to close those facilities that have least military value, so that we can focus our funds, focus our military construction, focus our sustainment on our most critical facilities,” she said.Written testimony and a webcast of the hearing on the installations, environment and energy budget request for fiscal 2017 submitted by DOD and the military services are available on the committee website.last_img read more

Nifty Sensex rebound after report of likely FPI tax rollback

first_imgReuters fileIndian shares rebounded from a sharp fall on Friday, following a media report that the government could soon announce a rollback of higher taxes for foreign portfolio investors (FPIs).As of 0511 GMT, the broader NSE Nifty was up 0.37% at 10,781.75, while the benchmark BSE Sensex was up 0.24% at 36,559.16. The indexes were lower by more than 0.80% in early trade on Friday.Yes Bank Ltd was the top gainer on the NSE and BSE indexes, rising 6.7% after a series of sharp declines in recent sessions.The NSE index was still on course to end nearly 3% lower for the week following three straight days in the red.Other Asian markets also remained subdued, with uncertainty over how much further the U.S. Federal Reserve would cut rates added to caution caused by global growth fears.MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was higher by 0.08%.A government official told Bloomberg News that India could announce a rollback of taxes for foreign portfolio investors (FPIs), BloombergQuint said in a tweet.A poorly received budget proposal on higher taxes for FPIs has contributed to a selloff in Indian markets, which has worsened amid an economic slowdown that has hit demand for everything from cars to underwear.A series of meetings this month between Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman and FPIs, and between Sitharaman and Prime Minister Narendra Modi had raised hopes of stimulus measures.But markets fell on Thursday after comments from India’s chief economic advisor suggested that companies should not depend on the government for a stimulus and need to change their mindset.last_img read more

Analysis of crocodile retina reveals trait that makes lying in wait easier

first_img More information: Nicolas Nagloo et al. Spatial resolving power and spectral sensitivity of the saltwater crocodile,, and the freshwater crocodile,, The Journal of Experimental Biology (2016). DOI: 10.1242/jeb.135673ABSTRACTCrocodilians are apex amphibious predators that occupy a range of tropical habitats. In this study, we examined whether their semi-aquatic lifestyle and ambush hunting mode are reflected in specific adaptations in the peripheral visual system. Design-based stereology and microspectrophotometry were used to assess spatial resolving power and spectral sensitivity of saltwater (Crocodylus porosus) and freshwater crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni). Both species possess a foveal streak that spans the naso-temporal axis and mediates high spatial acuity across the central visual field. The saltwater crocodile and freshwater crocodile have a peak spatial resolving power of 8.8 and 8.0 cycles deg−1, respectively. Measurement of the outer segment dimensions and spectral absorbance revealed five distinct photoreceptor types consisting of three single cones, one twin cone and a rod. The three single cones (saltwater/freshwater crocodile) are violet (424/426 nm λmax), green (502/510 nm λmax) and red (546/554 nm λmax) sensitive, indicating the potential for trichromatic colour vision. The visual pigments of both members of the twin cones have the same λmax as the red-sensitive single cone and the rod has a λmax at 503/510 nm (saltwater/freshwater). The λmax values of all types of visual pigment occur at longer wavelengths in the freshwater crocodile compared with the saltwater crocodile. Given that there is a greater abundance of long wavelength light in freshwater compared with a saltwater environment, the photoreceptors would be more effective at detecting light in their respective habitats. This suggests that the visual systems of both species are adapted to the photic conditions of their respective ecological niche. New look at crocodile eyes Most people have seen, if only on video, the silent means by which crocodiles hunt—with their bodies just below the surface and only their eyes and part of their snout visible—they wait for prey to wander close enough to grab with their long tooth filled maws. Now, in this new effort, the researchers have found a feature of their eyes that assists them in this type of hunting; the fovea, which is an area of receptors in the back of the eyeball that are set very close to one another, and in the case of crocodiles, they are formed as a long streak, rather than as a circular spot seen in other animals. It allows, the team explains, the animal to scan the near horizon without having to move its head at all—that makes it easier to sneak up on unsuspecting animals.The researchers report that they also found a major difference between the eyes of the saltwater crocs, versus their freshwater counterparts—the numbers of different types of photoreceptors in the retina. Freshies, as they are called, had more that were responsive to red light, whereas salties had more that were responsive to blue light. This, the team reports, makes sense because saltwater tends to have more blue light in it, while freshwater has more red in it. But, that is only a partial explanation, the team adds, because but both types of crocs have blurry vision when underwater. This, they suggest, means that the crocs do something under water that is still unknown, which is odd, because they do most of their hunting and mating on land. Both types do have the stretched fovea, they note, allowing them to lurk beneath the water without having to lift their heads, making their presence easier to mask—a feature, they report, that has not been seen in any other animal. Freshwater crocodile at Australia Zoo. Credit: Benchill /Wikipedia CC BY 3.0 Citation: Analysis of crocodile retina reveals trait that makes lying in wait easier (2016, May 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-05-analysis-crocodile-retina-reveals-trait.html Journal information: Journal of Experimental Biologycenter_img (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Western Australia, Crawley has discovered new details about crocodile vision that helps explain how it is they are so adept at waiting just under the water surface to capture prey that wanders too near. In their paper published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, the team describes their study of the eyeballs of both saltwater and freshwater crocodiles living in Australia, the differences between them, and a unique part of the retina they found. Explore further © 2016 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

M6 reopens nine hours after man dies in accident everything we know

first_imgGet the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA busy stretch of the M6 motorway in Staffordshire has reopened almost nine hours after a fatal accident this morning. Police, paramedics and firefighters were called to the southbound carriageway between junction 14 and junction 13, near Stafford, shortly after 3am. The motorway reopened shortly after 12pm and there are severe delays on a number of surrounding roads as of 12pm. Here’s everything we know so far: Read MoreSix injured after car collides with group of pedestrians near Staffordshire school   Emergency services were just after 3am to reports of an accident involving a lorry and a pedestrian. The incident took place just north of junction 13 (Stafford South) on the southbound carriageway Highways England and police had closed the southbound carriageway by 3.20am for what they called a ‘police-led incident’, with the route reopening just after 12pm. The northbound carriageway was also briefly shut but had reopened in a few minutes Long delays are reported on the motorway before the closure – with congestion back towards junction 16 and onto the A500 at one point There are also long delays on surrounding routes into Stafford including the A449 and A34 – with roadworks at Greyfriars Roundabout adding to delays on the route, which forms part of the official diversion A number of vehicles have broken down in the queues leading up to the closure, adding to delays A large number of vehicles were trapped in the closure, with some motorists still there more than six hours later. Highways England and the Central Motorway Police Group turned trapped traffic around and later released it via lane three of the motorway. Staffordshire Police confirmed a 30-year-old man, the pedestrian, had died as a result of the accident His family have been informed and are being supported by specially trained officers A forensic investigation by the Collision Investigation Unit took place before the route reopened. West Midlands Ambulance Service sent one ambulance and a paramedic officer to the scene The pedestrian was pronounced dead at the scene while the lorry driver, another man, was treated for minor injuries and discharged Anyone with information or dashcam footage is asked to contact Staffordshire Police on 101 quoting incident 52 of February 14. For further updates as we get them visit our dedicated update feed here. Read MoreInquests to open today into deaths of four children killed in house fire Want to tell us about something going on where you live? Let us know – Tweet us  @SOTLive  or message us on  our Facebook page .  And if you have pictures to share, tag us on Instagram at  StokeonTrentLive .last_img read more

Rust 134 releases with alternative cargo registries stabilized TryFrom and TryInto and

first_imgYesterday, the Rust team announced the release of Rust 1.34. This release introduces alternative cargo registries, includes support for ‘?’ operator in documentation tests, stabilized TryFrom and TryInto, and more. Support for alternative cargo registries Rust provides a public crate registry called crates.io where developers can publish crates with the cargo publish command. However, as this crate registry is not for people maintaining proprietary code, they are forced to use git or path dependencies. This release brings support for alternate cargo registries, which coexists with crates.io. So, users will now be able to write software that depends on crates from both crates.io and their custom registry. Support for the ‘?’ operator in documentation tests It was proposed in RFC 1937 to add support for the ‘?’ operator in the main() function, #[test] functions, and doctests allowing them to return Option or Result with error values.  This ensured a non-zero exit code in the case of the main() function and a test failure in the case of the tests. Support for the main() and #[test] functions were already implemented in previous versions. However, in the case of documentation tests, support for ‘?’ was limited to doctests that have an explicit main() function. In this release, the team has implemented full support for ‘?’ operator in doctests. Stabilized TryFrom and TryInto The TryFrom and TryInto traits that were proposed in an RFC back in 2016 are finally stabilized in this release to allow fallible type conversions. A ‘Infallible’ type is added for conversions that cannot fail such as u8 to u32. In future versions, the team plans to convert Infallible to an alias for the (!) never type. Library stabilizations This release comes with an expanded set of stable atomic integer types with signed and unsigned variants from 8 to 64 bits available. In the previous versions, non-zero unsigned integer types, for example, NonZeroU8 were stabilized. With this release, signed versions are also stabilized. The ‘iter::from_fn’ and ‘iter::successors’ functions are also stabilized. To know more about the updates in Rust 1.34, check out its official announcement. Read Next Chris Dickinson on how to implement Git in Rust The npm engineering team shares why Rust was the best choice for addressing CPU-bound bottlenecks Rust 1.33.0 released with improvements to Const fn, pinning, and more!last_img read more