People on the move 5114

first_imgJeannine Shao Collins named publisher at More. She was previously serving as Meredith 360 chief innovation officer. Theresa Griggs is now creative director at Cosmopolitan. She was previously design director at Women’s Health. mental_floss has named Erin McCarthy as its managing editor of digital content. McCarthy was previously deputy editor of digital for the brand.The New Yorker has named Jay Caspian Kang as editor of “Elements.” He was previously working in freelance after leaving his post as an editor at Grantland.HVACR Business magazine has made a few recent additions to its team:Bruce Sprague is now circulation manager. He was previously at Penton Media, where he managed circulation and fulfillment.Pete Grasso has been named editor. Grasso joins the magazine with a deep background in PR and b-to-b editorial.Tony D’Avino joined as director of business development. D’Avino was previously executive vice president at Advanstar.Mark Miller has resigned his post as deputy editorial director at The Hollywood Reporter. No news yet on Miller’s future endeavors or his replacement.last_img read more

BHU student shot dead inside campus by bikeborne assailants police arrests four

first_imgGaurav had been suspended by the university administration last year for his alleged role in the violence that singed the campus in 2017 over the issue of safety of students. He was accused of helping to burn down a bus in the violence, reported NDTV.The police have accessed the CCTV footages to apprehend the accused. “We have arrested four people in this matter. It was a case of personal enmity,” Anil Kumar Singh, Circle Officer, Varanasi Cantonment told a news agency. Gaurav was shot at by unidentified motorcycle-borne miscreants who opened fire at him and fled the spot.FacebookA Banaras Hindu University (BHU) student was shot at outside the gates of his hostel inside the university campus on Tuesday evening. The student, Gaurav Singh, succumbed to his injuries early on Wednesday morning.The incident happened in Uttar Pradesh’s Varanasi. Gaurav was shot at by unidentified motorcycle-borne miscreants who opened fire at him and fled the spot. The BHU student was pursuing his masters and resided in Lal Bahadur Shastri Hostel on the university campus. He was standing outside his hostel and talking to his friends when the mishap occurred. Although he was rushed to the trauma centre of the BHU’s Institute of Medical Sciences after sustaining bullet injuries, his life could not be saved. Rakesh Singh, Gaurav’s father, reportedly works at BHU.last_img read more

Female bosses freak men out

first_imgMen may feel threatened by woman bosses and act more assertively towards them than male supervisors, a research says. The study published in the journal Society for Personality and Social Psychology said that such behaviour by male employees working with woman managers could disrupt the workplace with struggles over power dynamics.“The concept of masculinity is becoming more elusive in society as gender roles blur, with more women taking management positions and becoming the major breadwinners for their families,” said researcher Ekaterina Netchaeva, assistant professor of management and technology at the Bocconi University in Milan. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“Even men who support gender equality may see these advances as a threat to their masculinity, whether they consciously acknowledge it or not.”In an experiment with 76 college students (52 male, 24 female) at a US university, participants were told they would negotiate their salary at a new job in a computer exercise with a male or female hiring manager.After the negotiation, participants took an implicit threat test where they guessed words that appeared on a computer screen for a fraction of a second. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixParticipants who chose more threat-related words, including “fear” or “risk,” were judged to feel more threatened.Male participants who negotiated with a female manager exhibited more threat and pushed for a higher salary ($49,400 average), compared to men negotiating with a male manager ($42,870 average).The manager’s gender did not affect female participants, Netchaeva said.The same results were reflected in two other experiments.Self-assertive behaviour by men toward female bosses could disrupt the workplace dynamics, stifle team cohesiveness and negatively affect team performance, Netchaeva said.In such cases, female supervisors may want to appear more proactive and less power-seeking to maintain smooth relationships in the workplace.last_img read more

Gastronomic sojourn from Delhi to Attari

first_imgKolkata : Carrying forward the spirit of progressive North Indian delicacies, ‘Sigree Global Grill’ and ‘Flame and Grill’ introduces The Food Highway NH1 Festival – the absolute culinary treat from Delhi to Attari. The trail celebrates the taste of rich flavors, exuberant aroma and magical tadka of the colorful land from Delhi to Punjab. A delectable array of beverages, main courses and desserts are sure to make you have a larger than life experience. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThis new festival picks the best of dishes from Delhi to Atari by adding some authentic recipes from Dhabas of Punjab. The restaurants present an exquisite array of menu,0 both for vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Vegetarians can delight their taste buds with progressive cart special ” Tom yum phoochka”, the delicious legendary “NH 1 ki Dal”, Dhaba style” Navrattan Korma”, etc. “Makaiki roti, Missi Roti” layered with dollop of white butter and Gur, give a treat to your taste buds. Non-vegetarians can opt for delicately crafted dishes like Masaledar ” Machhali Tawa Fry”, Dhabewala ” Saag Gosth”, “Butter Chicken” which is by nature Punjabi, etc. Dessert lovers can try Gulkand Ki Phirni, Candid fruit stuffed Gulab jamun and Aam papad Cheesecake. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe food highway NH1 redefines the exotic flavors of progressive Punjabi food. Most of the dishes boast of some innovative items that have been served to travelers. You can head to the Highway Food Festival and stop by for a good hearty meal. It’s perfect upscale casual dining destination for palates.The innovative menu will be on offer for a fortnight, for both lunch and dinner at Global Grill at Silver Arcade. Lunch will be served from 12.30 pm to 3.30 pm and dinner from 7.00 pm till 11.00 pm.last_img read more

HBOs Game of Thrones Pay TV operator Sky Deutschl

first_imgHBO’s Game of ThronesPay TV operator Sky Deutschland has seen over one million views for HBO series Game of Thrones on its Sky Go TV anywhere service since April.Sky Deutschland is currently showing new episodes from the third season of the show in synchronised and English versions on its Sky Atlantic HD channel.last_img

US broadband households watch an average of two ho

first_imgUS broadband households watch an average of two hours of “alternative content” on a computer each week from sources including Facebook, YouTube, Vimeo, and Dailymotion, according to Parks Associates.The research firm said that nearly one-half of US broadband homes watch user-generated content on a monthly basis and more than 10% watch livestreamed content – though only 7% of US broadband households watch sporting events via livestream.“Alternative video is an important part of the video landscape, and it competes with other video options for a share of consumer attention,” said Brett Sappington, senior director of research, Parks Associates.“Approximately one-half of households with a TV watch video from YouTube and similar sites on their TV set. In fact, more households watch online video from an app such as YouTube than watch video from a TV channel app.”“Younger consumers are far more likely to create their own content as well as watch user-generated content. For these viewers, the creation of content is as much a part of the entertainment experience as is watching video.“Increasingly, traditional content producers and service providers are leveraging alternative content in order to connect with audiences and draw viewers. Some are partnering with individual web celebrities and influencers who often have a disproportionately large influence on the user-generated side of the alternative content space.”last_img read more

Imagine as Christopher Buckley son of William F

first_imgImagine, as Christopher Buckley (son of William F.) did in his clever book, Boomsday, a plan to make the government solvent by offering incentives for people to kill themselves at age 70 and younger. Instead of calling it suicide, it would euphemistically be known as “Voluntary Transitioning.” Now we have Ezekiel Emanuel, Ari and Rahm’s brother, making quite a splash with his article “Why I Hope to Die at 75” in the Atlantic. While he doesn’t plan on suicide, he will stop receiving medical treatment. He says people deteriorate, and are less productive and creative. So why stay around so long? The former White House aid’s article makes Dr. Elizabeth Lee Vliet’s piece on Casey Research last December all the more interesting. She pointed out that Mr. Emanuel has written plenty about “The Complete Lives System” which: makes crystal clear that physicians must not focus on the individual patient. Instead, medical care should be allocated based on the patient’s usefulness to the “collective good.” If you’re too old, or too young, or your ailment is too complicated, society is better off letting you die rather than paying a doctor to heal you. One tenet of the Complete Lives system is that medical care for people under age 15 and over age 45 should be attenuated. “Attenuate” means to ration. Emanuel believes that the very young and the elderly are less valuable to society than those in the middle of the age curve. Mr. Emanuel is likely trying to start a trend and maybe even plant the idea for legislation to stop caring for people at 75—all for the good of the country, of course. Besides ghoulish, it’s a bit ironic, given the unwillingness of Americans to grow up. It’s telling that Obamacare covers children up to 26, as if the mid-20s is the new teenager. There was no such thing as a teenager before 1941; there were children and there were adults, explains Diana West in her book The Death of the Grown-Up. Now, turning 13 brings on the wonderful, entitled world of being a teen instead of taking a small step toward adulthood, and according to West “due to the permanent hold our culture has placed on the maturation process, that’s where they’re likely to find most adults.” For instance, it turns out more adults watch the Cartoon Network than CNN. And while CNN is a low bar, remembering that my old boss, the CEO of a bank, would constantly watch SpongeBob SquarePants, I can believe this. Ms. West writes that the previous generation was “one not yet under the influence of a youth culture of licentious boys (sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll) and petulant girls (women’s lib), shaped [by] that most basic human instinct—survival. Elevated by a maturing belief in duty, honor, loyalty, and forbearance, the instinct to survive wasn’t just a self-concern; it was, it turned out, the saving grace of civilization.” So what’s happened? Why the societal breakdown? We’ve had Republicans and we’ve had Democrats in charge. It doesn’t matter. It’s inflation and democracy. Both shorten people’s time horizons. As a nation, we live for the moment because our money is constantly degraded and our politicians steal from us continuously. In his masterful examination of the Thomas Mann short story Disorder and Early Sorrow, professor Paul Cantor observes, “Mann is as acute in portraying the psychological effects of inflation as he is in portraying the economic, social and political effects.” Mann shows “inflation fundamentally changes the way people think, forcing them to live for the moment.” With everyone’s time horizons shortened during the Weimar hyperinflation, hard work and prudent investing are believed foolish. In Death and Early Sorrow, the older generation lost its authority and youth dominated. The children acted like adults and the adults acted like children. “The young are more adaptable to changing conditions, while the old are set in their ways,” writes Cantor, “Hence the young cope better with inflation.” Mann saw inflation change the dynamic between generations in society. With “the young [having] a huge advantage over the old,” Cantor explains. “Not having experienced economic stability, the youth of Germany are more able to go with the inflationary flow.” Mann’s principal character, Professor Cornelius, has a servant, young Xaver, who is the perfect inflationary child. Xaver, Mann described, “utterly lacks a sense of duty and can as little be trained to the performance of the daily round and common task as some kinds of dog can be taught to jump over a stick.” Xaver has no feeling for the past and lacks the discipline so prized in Germany. Cantor points out that the elderly “become increasingly irrelevant” in an inflationary environment. It’s well known that inflation especially punishes those on fixed incomes. “Mann fills in our sense of the psychological disruptions that accompany the economic ravages of inflation,” writes Cantor. “More than any other factor, inflation discredits the authority of the older generation and turns power over to youth.” With prices soaring, youthful vices look like wisdom; the conservatism and prudence of the elderly are made to look silly. In his epic Democracy: The God That Failed, Hans-Hermann Hoppe explained that democracy increases societal time preference and with democratic rule “contrary to conventional wisdom, the decivilizing forces inherent in any form of government are systematically strengthened.” The private ownership of government (monarchy) is much more long-term oriented. Rulers may pass on a nation’s wealth to their heirs. In a democracy, politicians can only use government resources. A president has every incentive to maximize current income at the expense of capital value. A president being a temporary caretaker, explains Hoppe, “will use up as much of the government resources as quickly as possible, for what he does not consume now, he may never be able to consume.” And since in a democracy anyone can be president or in government, “public resistance against government power is systematically weakened,” Hoppe writes. “While expropriation and taxation before may have appeared clearly oppressive and evil to the public, they seem much less so, mankind being what it is, once anyone may freely enter the ranks of those who are at the receiving end.” Ever oppressive government and increased taxation make saving for the future look futile. One might as well live for today if what you save will only be confiscated by government. As democracy dictates that the haves take care of the have-nots, “there will be less productive activity, self-reliance and future-orientation, and more consumption, parasitism, dependency and shortsightedness,” Professor Hoppe writes. What democracy and government have done is to retard the natural tendency of humanity to build an expanding stock of capital and durable consumer goods. Man, instead of becoming increasingly more farsighted and providing for ever more distant goals, is tending toward decivilization. As Hoppe describes, “formerly provident providers will be turned into drunks or daydreamers, adults into children, civilized men into barbarians, and producers into criminals.” When someone so powerful as Emanuel, leading by example, advocates for the elderly to get out of the way, society has indeed devolved. Too much money and too much government have turned civilized people into barbaric children.last_img read more

first_img – The Attack America Never Saw Coming Another surprise attack against the U.S. dollar is coming. And soon, too. This attack won’t be from China. Instead, this one will hurt the worst — coming from a sworn “ally” of Americans. Click here to view this short, 60-second message on how to prepare for the next “surprise” currency move. Learn about the realities of identity theft and defend yourself accordingly. Have some or all of your start-over funds hidden. Growing to Fear Black Swans I knew little about risk theory when, in my early 30s, I decided to become wealthy. But even then, I understood that financial predictions rarely seemed to come true, even when they were convincingly argued. So, rather than trying to become an expert at economics or the financial markets, I made a practical plan that I hoped would allow me to create wealth without foresight. I see now that my plan was aimed at becoming antifragile. I bought safe bonds and index funds and real estate. I eventually bought gold, too, but not as a means to make money (which happened) but as a store of wealth and a hedge against inflation. I collected art for the same reason. I figured that the value of my art might go up while other assets were going down. And all the while, I kept investing in small businesses that I understood and could control as a key shareholder. This gave me not only the chance of equity growth but also a steady flow of current income. My plan, in other words, was about what I knew to be happening at the moment than what I thought would happen in the future. I bought gold because I had been reading Bill Bonner. This was back when gold was trading at about $450 per ounce. Without gold in my portfolio, I felt fragile. So I bought gold coins, not to profit from a price surge, but to protect myself. Likewise, I got out of the rental real estate market when prices were getting too high. Everyone was sure prices would keep rising. I wasn’t sure. But if they did crash—as some writers were predicting—I wanted to be safe. So I got out of the market around 2006. Buying gold cost me money. I saw it as an insurance premium…and a cheap one at that. Getting out of the real estate market felt like I was giving up future profits. But I considered that, too, a sort of premium—to protect the profits I’d already made from the properties I owned. Using Taleb’s terms, buying gold and selling real estate was a move to make myself less fragile. The Best Ways to Achieve Financial Antifragility Diversify your assets into at least four and at best six of the following categories: cash, bonds, stocks, gold, options, and rental real estate. If you don’t own a business, start or invest in one. Make sure it is a business that you understand and over which you can have some control. — Invest in quality, dividend-paying stocks. I would define these as antifragile because of the long-term approach, the policy of buying more stock during downturns, and the fact that these stocks rise quickly after drops. Don’t give up your active income. If you don’t have a job now, get one, even if the income is small. Editor’s Note: There are some things in life you can’t predict… In today’s Weekend Edition, Palm Beach Research Group founder Mark Ford argues that no one can know for sure when the next economic disaster will happen. Instead of trying to predict the unpredictable, Mark recommends ten steps you can take to make your finances “antifragile”… How to Survive and Profit From Black Swan Events By Mark Morgan Ford Several years ago Nassim Taleb, author of The Black Swan, came out with a bestselling book called Antifragile. You may have read it. If not, I recommend it. It’s one of those rare books that presents the reader with a feast of delectable ideas. I find myself savoring every page—as much as I might enjoy a bite at a dinner of prime rib, garlic mashed potatoes, and sautéed spinach. Useful facts: Antifragile can be seen as a sequel to The Black Swan, which can be seen as a sequel to Fooled by Randomness. Taleb’s argument is that (a) people underestimate how much randomness there is in life (Fooled by Randomness), (b) the most important events are often unpredictable (The Black Swan), and (c) it is possible to not just protect yourself from such events but also to benefit from them by being antifragile. If I hadn’t read Taleb, I’m sure I would have resisted his ideas. I don’t like the idea that you can’t predict important events. I’d prefer to think that if you had enough data and enough computer power, you could. But Taleb is a nimble thinker and a seductive writer. He loves to poke fun at conventional wisdom—whether it is on the subject of health (cholesterol is bad), economics (the Fed can manage the economy), or traffic regulations (more streetlights mean more safety). In Antifragile, he picks up on the “Black Swan” idea. He argues that there are some things in life we can predict and others that we can’t. But what we can do, Taleb asserts, is determine whether something might be destroyed by an unpredictable event. A glass vase, for example, is likely to be destroyed in an earthquake. A stuffed bear is more likely to survive. So rather than spending time trying to predict the unpredictable, we should try to understand whether our practices, programs, and possessions could be destroyed by Black Swans. And if they can, we should work to change that. One thing we can do is find ways to make our practices, programs and possessions more robust: more likely to survive catastrophic events. An even better thing we can do—and this is the core message of Antifragile—is find ways to profit from Black Swans. Robustness, Taleb says, is the quality of being able to endure ruinous events. A very healthy person, for example, is more likely to survive pneumonia than someone who is sickly. His thesis is that when it comes to the economy (among other things), we should do things that make us antifragile to economic disaster. This is more helpful than trying to predict catastrophes. I’m sure you are thinking that this is just common sense. But as Taleb points out in Antifragile, this is the opposite of what the Fed and many financial experts do. Some financial writers, for example, spend their careers trying to predict how certain political and economic events might forecast the ups and downs of the market. Others, like technical analysts, make market predictions based on patterns they have observed in the past. As a wealth builder, you have a choice. You can adhere to the idea that markets can be timed and search out the best models for predicting them…or accept Taleb’s thesis and become an antifragile investor. How to Beat Wall St. 96.2% of the Time Over the last 8 years, a British ex-banker has been conducting one of the world’s largest investment “experiments.” In its initial testing, 84% of people said this simple strategy would put an extra $5-25k (per year) in their pocket. And now, over the last 4 years this investment strategy has provided a documented 96.2% win rate. Once banned in the UK for 127 straight years, this technique is now completely legal in the UK and America… Click here to find out more… Editor’s Note: Mark’s business partner Tom Dyson is hosting a free training series on “antifragile” income investing this week. Tom’s income strategy works whether markets are going up, down, or sideways. Developed over eight years of testing, it’s a virtual “can’t miss” strategy that has shown to be successful 96.2% of the time. To register for Tom’s free training series, go here now… Create a “start-over” fund that is equal to at least six months’ income. Also, have a “start-over” plan. It must be enough to cover your projected costs of starting over. Get insurance—but only what you really need—to protect your health, your house, and all of your other valuable possessions. Develop your cash-producing assets (options, performance stocks, bonds, and rental real estate) so that, in time, each one will give you ample yearly income. Get privacy guards for all of your Internet activities. Recommended Linkslast_img read more

Pollution much like wealth is not distributed eq

first_imgPollution, much like wealth, is not distributed equally in the United States. Scientists and policymakers have long known that black and Hispanic Americans tend to live in neighborhoods with more pollution of all kinds, than white Americans. And because pollution exposure can cause a range of health problems, this inequity could be a driver of unequal health outcomes across the U.S.A study published Monday in the journal PNAS adds a new twist to the pollution problem by looking at consumption. While we tend to think of factories or power plants as the source of pollution, those polluters wouldn’t exist without consumer demand for their products. The researchers found that air pollution is disproportionately caused by white Americans’ consumption of goods and services, but disproportionately inhaled by black and Hispanic Americans. “This paper is exciting and really quite novel,” says Anjum Hajat, an epidemiologist at the University of Washington who was not involved in the study. “Inequity in exposure to air pollution is well documented, but this study brings in the consumption angle.” Hajat says the study reveals an inherent unfairness: “If you’re contributing less to the problem, why do you have to suffer more from it?”The study, led by engineering professor Jason Hill at the University of Minnesota, took over six years to complete. According to the paper’s first author Christopher Tessum, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington, the idea stemmed from a question at a conference.Tessum presented earlier research on how blacks and Hispanics are often more exposed to air pollutants than whites. After he finished, someone asked “if it would be possible to connect exposure to air pollution to who is doing the actual consuming,” says Tessum. According to Tessum, no one had ever tried to answer that question. It’s a big, complicated issue, but studying it could address a fundamental question: Are those who produce pollution, through their consumption of goods and services, fairly sharing in the costs?What kind of data could even answer such a multifaceted question? Let’s break it down:For any given area in the U.S., the researchers would need to know how polluted the air was, what communities were exposed to pollution, and the health effects of that level of exposure.Then, for the same area the researchers would need to identify the sources of that exposure (coal plants, factories, agriculture to name a few), and get a sense of what goods and services stem from those emissions (electricity, transportation, food).Finally, whose consumption of goods and services drives those sectors of the economy? “The different kinds of data, by themselves, aren’t that complicated,” says Tessum. “It’s linking them where things get a little trickier.” The most relevant air pollutant metric for human health is “particulate matter 2.5” or PM2.5. It represents the largest environmental health risk factor in the United States with higher levels linked to more cardiovascular problems, respiratory illness, diabetes and even birth defects. PM2.5 pollution is mostly caused by human activities, like burning fossil fuels or agriculture.The EPA collects these data through the National Emissions Inventory, which collates emissions from specific emitters, like coal plants or factories, measures of mobile polluters like cars or planes, and natural events like wildfires, painting a detailed picture of pollution across the U.S.The researchers generated maps of where different emitters, like agriculture or construction, caused PM2.5 pollution. Coal plants produced pockets of pollution in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, while agricultural emissions were concentrated in the Midwest and California’s central valley. “We then tied in census data to understand where different racial-ethnic groups live to understand exposure patterns,” says Hill. Tessum then used previous research on the health effects of different exposure levels to estimate how many premature deaths per year (out of an estimated 102,000 from domestic human-caused emissions) could be linked to each emitter. “We wanted to take this study further by ascribing responsibility of these premature deaths to different sectors [of the economy], and ultimately to the consumers, and maybe consumers of different racial and ethnic groups,” says Hill.To do that, the researchers actually worked backwards, following consumer spending to different sectors of the economy, and then ultimately to the main emitters of air pollution. Consider one major contributor to emissions: agriculture. Consumer expenditure surveys from the Bureau of Labor Statistics provide detailed data on how much money households spend in various sectors of the economy, including food.These data gave the researchers an idea of how much blacks, Hispanics, and whites spend on food per year. Other expenditures, like energy or entertainment, are also measured. Taken together these data represent the consumption patterns of the three groups.To translate dollars spent on food into air pollution levels, the researchers traced money through the economy. Using data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the researchers can estimate, for example, how much grocery stores or restaurants spend on food. Eventually, these dollars are linked back to the primary emitters — the farms growing the food or the fuel that farmers buy to run their tractors. The researchers have now completed the causal chain, from dollars spent at the grocery story, to the amount of pollution emitted into the atmosphere. Completing this chain for each source of pollution revealed whose consumption drives air pollution, and who suffers from it.After accounting for population size differences, whites experience about 17 percent less air pollution than they produce, through consumption, while blacks and Hispanics bear 56 and 63 percent more air pollution, respectively, than they cause by their consumption, according to the study. “These patterns didn’t seem to be driven by different kinds of consumption,” says Tessum, “but different overall levels.” In other words, whites were just consuming disproportionately more of the same kinds of goods and services resulting in air pollution than minority communities.”These results, as striking as they are, aren’t really surprising,” says Ana Diez Roux, an epidemiologist at Drexel University who was not involved in the study. “But it’s really interesting to see consumption patterns rigorously documented suggesting that minority communities are exposed to pollution that they bear less responsibility for.”Diez Roux thinks this is a good first step. “They certainly make assumptions in their analysis that might be questioned down the line, but I doubt that the overall pattern they found will change,” she says.Tessum points to some hopeful results from the study. PM2.5 exposure by all groups has fallen by about 50 percent from 2002 to 2015, driven in part by regulation and population movement away from polluted areas. But the inequity remains mostly unchanged.While more research is needed to fully understand these differences, the results of this study raise questions about how to address these inequities.Tessum stresses that “we’re not saying that we should take away white people’s money, or that people shouldn’t be able to spend money.” He suggests continuing to strive to make economic activity and consumption less polluting could be a way to manage and lessen the inequities.Diez Roux thinks that stronger measures may be necessary. “If want to ameliorate this inequity, we may need to rethink how we build our cities and how they grow, our dependence on automobile transportation,” says Diez Roux. “These are hard things we have to consider.”Jonathan Lambert is an intern on NPR’s Science Desk. You can follow him on Twitter: @evolambert Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

A costcutting council is set to introduce new pol

first_imgA cost-cutting council is set to introduce new policies that will force disabled people with high-cost support packages out of their own homes and into residential and nursing institutions.Labour-run Southampton city council wants to cut its adult social care budget by £1.5 million in 2016-17.As part of those cuts, it wants to increase the use of telecare – such as personal alarms and sensors – so that it can reduce the need for visits from care workers and routine “wellbeing” checks, while also increasing care charges.But it also plans to review the personal budgets of every disabled person with a package of more than £500 a week, and consider if it would be cheaper to fund them for extra care housing, or nursing or residential care.A new council consultation – which ends on 31 January, or 14 January via an online survey – points out that 212 people in the city have care packages of more than £500 per week, which is “much higher” than the standard rate for residential care of £369 per week.If the proposals go ahead, the council would consider if extra care housing, residential or nursing care would be a more “cost effective” way to meet these individuals’ needs.The consultation document says: “If this is the case, we would typically set the personal budget at a level which would fund the identified extra care housing scheme, or appropriate residential or nursing placement.“The service user can then choose to either enter residential or nursing care, or to use their personal budget towards the cost of receiving care and support at home or in an alternative placement.”Ian Loynes (pictured), chief executive of Spectrum Centre for Independent Living, a user-led organisation which campaigns and provides services in Southampton, said the proposals were “deeply concerning” and “pretty bleak”.He said: “We need to fight this assault on people’s liberty and independence.“It’s pretty bleak already, but any prospect of moving people living independently in the community into residential care – it is impossible to see how that would be effectively meeting their needs.”Loynes said that disabled people in Southampton would be unlikely to have any extra resources they could use to top-up the council funding because the council’s charging policy meant that it already takes 100 per cent of their disposable income.He added: “Southampton have a very poor record of consulting and changing anything.“Their results of consultation normally change nothing in the way of policy.”Meanwhile, local media have reported that the council plans to build a £12 million “super care home”, with accommodation for up to 95 disabled people.Linda Burnip, co-founder of Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC)*, said: “This is particularly worrying because Southampton have spent so much money building their new ‘super care home’ and it is also against all the principles of independent living to impose an illegal ceiling on the amount of funding people are allowed to have.“We are obviously concerned that if Southampton are able to do this then other local authorities will do the same.”Cllr David Shields, the council’s cabinet member for health and adult social care, said: “It is very important to remember that no decision on this issue has been made.“The council is engaged in an open and meaningful consultation exercise and consequently welcomes all views on the proposal to inform its decision.”But a council spokesman said it was faced with “difficult decisions” in meeting a budget shortfall of £39 million next year and £90 million by 2020-21, while the measure would affect less than five per cent of adults receiving council-funded care, and the council would “consider individual circumstances on a case by case basis”.He added: “The council has to balance an individual’s preferences with its requirement to use its fixed budget to support everyone in Southampton who has eligible adult social care needs and we consider the proposed approach to be more equitable.”He denied that the policy would breach article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which says governments should ensure that disabled people have “the opportunity to choose their place of residence and where and with whom they live on an equal basis with others and are not obliged to live in a particular living arrangement”.And he said that the development described by local media as a “super care home” would in fact provide “extra care housing” and so was not a care or residential home, and would allow individuals “the independence of living in their own flat, but with the reassurance of on-site support and 24 hour care”.He said: “This is consistent with the council’s policy of exploring whether an individual’s needs can be met in appropriate extra care housing before residential or nursing care is considered.”*Anyone from Southampton who thinks they might be affected by the changes and would like to take action to prevent the policy being carried out can email DPAC at: mail@dpac.uk.netlast_img read more

Disabled young people have told MPs how they have

first_imgDisabled young people have told MPs how they have been “cheated” by the government’s new system for supporting pupils and students through school and college.MPs on the Commons educationcommittee heard howdisabled pupils were being denied a voice in drawing up their education, healthand care plans (EHCPs), and how they were not receiving what had been promisedin those plans.Thecommittee also heard that EHCPs were too focused on education, rather thanbeing “life focused”.Thecommittee heard from seven disabled young people on Tuesday as part of itsinquiry into the impact of the special educational needs and disabilities(SEND) reforms introduced by the government through its Children and FamiliesAct 2014*.Three of them – Jordan, Ben and Eva (pictured, centre, left and right) – were part of the RIP: STARS research team, a project led by disabled young people and researchers at Coventry University, which also included support from The Alliance for Inclusive Education, and looked at the quality of EHCPs and whether they met disabled children and young people’s rights.Jordan saidsome of their findings had been “stunning”, and that he and many other disabledyoung people “feel we were cheated out of the education system and treatedpoorly by them”.He said theymade the “atrocious” discovery that disabled children “weren’t actually beinginvolved in the process of their EHCPs”, with the main discussions taking place“without talking to the child themselves”.He saidplans were “either being delayed, mistaken, poorly done and they are notmeeting the needs of the child”, and he called for something to be done toensure that plans “are being carried out correctly by staff” and “not justignored and forgotten”.Eva, anothermember of RIP: STARS, said: “We found out that what was written in the plan wasnot being followed through, so many children aren’t receiving the support andthe correct education that they need and they are missing out on theireducation and childhood.”She said theplans were not preparing disabled children and young people for independenceand adulthood.Eva said theplans should use the language of the social model of disability “so childrenare not defined by labels and they are not seen as a problem”. She added:“Disabled children have a right to mainstream education, so they should achievesupport to achieve this and be in mainstream education if they choose to doso.”Ben, a thirddisabled young person from RIP: STARS, said EHCPs were “too educational focusedand not life focused, so children are not receiving the support they need inother important areas such as developing independence, having choice andcontrol, achieving aspirations, life goals, friends, access in the community.”He said itwas not right that disabled pupils who do not fit in with the “norms and rolesand rules of education” were often “shipped off, excluded, offloaded, or hiddenin other places” and “forgotten about”.Francesca,one of two deaf pupils on the National Deaf Children’s Society’s (NDCS) young people’s advisory boardwho gave evidence, told the committee that a lack of support at school meantshe missed out on social situations and on learning “how to be confident andempowered”.She said shehad even been encouraged to use a separate “SEND room” at lunch, which alsomade it harder to build friendships with non-disabled pupils.She said:“It’s showing to the other students that these people need to be kept separate,which I feel is the wrong attitude completely. “It shouldbe about inclusivity and empowering those people.”Francescasaid that meetings about EHCPs sometimes happened without the disabled youngperson being present.She said:“It’s really frustrating because you feel you can make your own decisionsbecause it is your own support.”Anothermember of the NDCS advisory board, Ella, said she was “really struggling” tosecure the support she needed through the EHCP process, with the local councilcurrently refusing to provide her with a plan because it did not think she wasdeaf enough. As a result,she said, her grades were “far below what they should be”.And she saidthe only people the council would listen to were her parents, and not her.Simran, whois studying accountancy and management at Queen Mary University of London and waswith the charity my AFK, said: “As a disabled woman, I have to work harder thaneveryone else to achieve anything.“I thinkit’s a great shame that young people with SEND are left unsupported and theirachievements are unappreciated. “I’m a 21-year-oldstudying accountancy and I want to be an accountant, I want to work, I want tocontribute to the economy and society, but I feel like there’s not very manyopportunities for me to do so.”Kashifa, whois studying at college and was also with my AFK, said she had received “a lotmore support” when she was at school.She said:“Even though we had meetings about me going to college, I’m not sure theyreally understood my needs when I got there. “I thinkpeople make a judgement about what you’re capable of based on your appearance. “I knowpeople mean well and they know you get anxious in certain situations, and theywant to try to protect you, but this just means you won’t be able to tryanything because people think you won’t be able to cope, so the opportunitiesstop.”She added:“I don’t need people to tell me I need to be realistic, either. “I want towork things out for myself and then be able to make the choice. “I don’tneed to be protected all the time, I just need the chance to try differentthings and then I can decide.”*Under government reforms which came into effect in September 2014, local authorities in England had until April 2018 to move all disabled children and young people eligible for support from SEN statements to new EHCPs. The plans last from birth to the age of 25 and set out all the support they should receive across education, health and social care.A note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

Holiday Pro Tip Dont Screw Up Your Online Layaway Process

first_img Next Article Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Register Now » Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Add to Queue –shares December 17, 2014 Assistant Editor, Contributed Contentcenter_img Updated at 5:15 p.m. ETIf you made a list (and checked it twice) of holiday gifts that you put on layaway in Kmart’s online system, some or all of those items might not get delivered — even if they’ve been paid for in full.After notifying customers that their online layaway items had to be paid off by Dec. 14 in order to be delivered by Christmas, Kmart began canceling orders because items were “out of stock,” reports Consumerist. Moreover, the refunds for those canceled items were reportedly expected to arrive too late to buy new holiday gifts.Related: 5 Reputation Missteps to Avoid During the HolidaysOutraged customers took to Kmart’s Facebook page to voice complaints. In a statement, Kmart said it is working to remedy the situation by offering affected customers free shipping and no charge for the items in question, or a gift card in cases where the items are no longer available. “We are in the process of contacting our customers and members who have received inadvertent cancellation notices for their online layaway contracts. This issue is specific to online layaway contracts for ship to home and does not impact in store layaways. Here’s what we are doing.  First, we have processed refunds for cancelled items and our customers and members will receive these refunds soon, if they haven’t already.  Second, we are working to find the items that were identified as out of stock – and if we can find them we will provide those items for free and ship at no cost.  If we don’t have those items, we will provide an e-gift card that can be used toward the purchase of items in the amount equal to the items cancelled in their order.We have expressed to our members how deeply sorry we are that this has happened – and we know this is a special time of year for families.  We are working hard to make things right.”Kmart has yet to explain why customers received “inadvertent cancellation notices” for their paid-for orders, but there’s certainly a lesson here for all businesses: you need to have a system of checks and balances in place to help with organization, especially during these hectic holiday times.It looks like a few Kmart executives can expect coal in their stockings this year — unless the sender put it on layaway online.Related: Dr. Dre Inspires Amazing Hanukkah Gift: The Dr. Dreidel Holiday Pro Tip: Don’t Screw Up Your Online Layaway Process Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Carly Okyle Business Mistakes 3 min readlast_img read more

New York City Caves on Plan to Cap Uber Drivers

first_imgRegulations Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Next Article New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, under pressure from business groups, citizens and high-profile celebrities and entrepreneurs, has backed off of a plan that would have limited the number of cars Uber could manage in the city.Under an agreement, first reported by The New York Times, New York will instead conduct a four-month study on the effect of Uber and other non-yellow-cab companies on the city’s traffic and environment. A city council bill to impose a cap on the number of Uber cars will be scrapped for now.”We’re pleased to have reached an agreement with Mayor de Blasio’s administration and the City Council to collaborate on a joint transportation study and to work together on ways to continue expanding economic opportunity, mobility and transportation access in the city,” said Josh Mohrer, general manager of Uber NYC, in a statement. “We are pleased new drivers will continue to be free to join the for-hire industry and partner with Uber.”New York wanted what some saw as onerous regulations, capping Uber’s growth, as well as the prospects for rivals like Lyft. Under the proposed plan that has been shelved, Uber would have been required to stay within the city’s limits, which would allow car bases larger than 500 vehicles to increase by only 1 percent each year.Related: What Uber Has Learned About Expansion, Hurdles and Growing PainsDe Blasio had said curbing Uber was necessary for environmental issues. But actual riders balked, saying New York’s yellow (and green) cabs were notoriously unavailable and lacked the convenience of Uber, which has arguably the best ride-sharing and ride-hailing app. De Blasio’s plan was universally unpopular. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a fellow Democrat, was against it. Several celebrities pressured de Blasio, who has earned distrust from the New York entrepreneurial community for what some perceive as an anti-business stance and pro-regulation stance by his administration. Ashton Kutcher, an Uber investor, has been among the loudest critics, but others, like actor Neil Patrick Harris and supermodel Kate Upton have also weighed in.It even became a civil rights issue, as some black residents said Uber solved the problem of cab drivers intentionally avoiding picking up black passengers.Uber has become the symbol of innovation and disruption in an industry, changing the way many people travel in major cities around the world. But that has clashed with entrenched and heavily regulated industries like taxis, who pay cities high fees for licenses to operate. This has caused Uber and its supporters to claim cities are engaging in regulatory capture, where governments protect the special interests of the groups over which they have the most regulation, at the expense of more innovative approaches to solve problems.Related: Chipotle Raises Prices in San Francisco After Minimum Wage Hike Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Enroll Now for $5 Editor-at-Large Guest Writer Image credit: Shutterstock | Enhanced by Entrepreneurcenter_img July 22, 2015 –shares 3 min read Add to Queue Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand New York City Caves on Plan to Cap Uber Drivers Ray Hennesseylast_img read more

People with sight problems could benefit from new surgical trial

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 29 2019People with sight problems could benefit from a surgical trial advance that has been shown to help restore the surface of the eye.Doctors made the world-first step by carrying out a clinical trial using stem cells from donors to create tissue that was transplanted into patients with a condition that causes blindness.Researchers say the trial offers clues about how eye tissue loss could be repaired using stem cells from organ donors. It also sheds light on the causes of sight disorders.The trial focused on limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), which can result from damage to eye from chemicals or heat, or be caused by a disease called aniridia. It leads to scarring and severe vision loss in both eyes as well as chronic pain and redness.LSCD is a significant cause of sight loss – especially in countries where resources and services are limited – but it does not typically respond to standard treatments.To carry out the trial, researchers – led by the University of Edinburgh and the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service – isolated stem cells in the eye’s protective layer, known as the cornea.A normal healthy cornea is transparent, but becomes scarred and opaque when specialised stem cells are lost in LSCD.These cornea samples were taken from people who had donated their eyes after death.The team then grew the stem cells – which have the unique ability to transform into other cell types – into tissue ready to be transplanted.Sixteen patients were split into two groups with both given eye drops and medicines to suppress their immune system to reduce transplant rejection. One group was also given the stem cells.This is the first time that stem cells have been used in this way in a randomised clinical trial – the gold standard scientific method for testing a new treatment.Related StoriesBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’Patients who had received the stem cells showed significant repair of their eyes’ ocular surface – the outermost layer – over 18 months, which was not seen in those who did not receive the treatment.Both the stem cell group and the control group showed improvements in vision, which researchers say warrants further investigation a larger trial.Scientists have hailed the step as a landmark for cell-based surgery. They say it shows promise for repairing the eye’s surface, paving the way for similar donor trials to be planned.The team suggest that the immune system could play a driving role in some forms of LSCD, but caution that more research is needed.The project, published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine was funded by UK Stem Cell Foundation, Scottish Enterprise and the Chief Scientist Office, part of Scottish Government Health Directorates.Baljean Dhillon, Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, who led the study, said: “The findings from this small study are very promising and show the potential for safe stem cell eye surgery as well as improvements in eye repair.”Our next steps are to better understand how stem cells could promote tissue repair for diseases that are extremely hard to treat and if, and how, they could help to restore vision.”Marc Turner, Medical Director of the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service and Professor of Cellular Therapy at the University of Edinburgh said: “Clinical studies such as these help us to understand how complex new cellular therapies may be able to complement existing medical approaches in restoring function to damaged tissues and organs.”Source: https://www.ed.ac.uk/last_img read more

New research to investigate impact of therapy animals on pediatric cancer patients

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 27 2019The sight of a dog in a therapy vest trotting down a hospital hallway or being petted by a child lying in a hospital bed is familiar to many, yet the scientific research showing the impact of therapy animals is largely anecdotal, says Vanderbilt University School of Nursing Professor Mary Jo Gilmer, PhD, FAAN. Her work is changing that.Gilmer studies the impact animals can have on children with life-threatening conditions. She recently received a grant from nonprofit Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) for a pilot program investigating the health benefits of human-animal interactions (HAIs) in reducing suffering of children with cancer undergoing debilitating treatments.”In this carefully designed research, we are evaluating the effects of human-animal interactions on reducing anxiety, depression, worry and pain, and increasing quality of life in children with advanced cancer, as well as their parents,” Gilmer said. “The goal is to obtain strong data to support the positive health benefits of HAIs in decreasing suffering of children, particularly those diagnosed with advanced cancer.”For the study, children are randomly assigned to a group receiving usual care or a group receiving usual care plus HAI. The human-animal interactions include interfacing with a therapy dog registered with Pet Partners, a national organization with strict standards that promote health and wellness benefits of HAI.Then a registered canine team visits for 10-15 minutes during each child’s potentially anxiety-producing hospital or clinic appointments, which occur approximately every week. After being introduced to the dog, the child and parents participate in activities such as petting the dog, taking it on a walk or teaching it new tricks.Children and their parents or guardians complete measures of stress/anxiety, depression and quality of life at the start of the project and then at every interaction for three months.Related StoriesResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping Children”During the course of treatment, children with cancer may experience a variety of threats to their quality of life. Impaired communication, anxiety and stress, long-term hospitalization and isolation affect children’s psychological well-being,” Gilmer said. “Frequently, they experience pain, dyspnea, nausea, drowsiness and fatigue. The complexity of these factors compound the already difficult task children face in effectively coping with their disease. There’s a critical need for novel, yet rigorous research that can mitigate physical distress and improve quality of life for these children with serious illnesses.”Gilmer believes that the study’s results will provide a strong foundation for full-scale testing of human-animal interventions among children receiving treatment for cancer; the results will also identify characteristics of those most likely to benefit.The study builds off Gilmer’s previous research, which showed the benefit of human-animal interactions on children newly diagnosed with cancer and their parents. That study, published in the Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, showed that regular visits from a therapy dog contributed to positive psychosocial benefits to families of children during the initial stages of pediatric cancer treatment.”HABRI is proud to be supporting research focused on the potential for human-animal interactions to benefit children with an advanced disease and their families,” said Steven Feldman, Executive Director of HABRI. “HABRI hopes that the results of this study will build on existing science that demonstrates that interaction with companion animals can aid in the healing process, and serve as a valuable tool for alleviating anxiety and stress for these deserving patients and their families.” Source:https://ww2.mc.vanderbilt.edu/last_img read more

Ecigarette vaping with nicotine appears to impair mucus clearance

first_img Source:American Thoracic Society Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 7 2019E-cigarette vaping with nicotine appears to hamper mucus clearance from the airways, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.In “Electronic Cigarette Vapor with Nicotine Causes Airway Mucociliary Dysfunction Preferentially via TRPA1 Receptors,” a team of researchers from the University of Kansas, University of Miami and Mt. Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach reports that exposing human airway cells to e-cigarette vapor containing nicotine in culture resulted in a decreased ability to move mucus or phlegm across the surface. This phenomenon is called “mucociliary dysfunction.” The researchers report the same finding in vivo in sheep, whose airways mimic those of humans when exposed to e-cigarette vapor. Related StoriesSmoke-free generation ‘in sight’ as numbers of smokers drop dramaticallyEffective stop smoking treatments less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditionsStudy shows association between use of mentholated cigarettes and smoking cessationMucociliary dysfunction is a feature of many lung diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis. Specifically, the study found that vaping with nicotine impairs ciliary beat frequency, dehydrates airway fluid and makes mucus more viscous or sticky. These changes make it more difficult for the bronchi, the main passageways to the lung, to defend themselves from infection and injury.The researchers note that a recent report found that young e-cigarette users who never smoked were at increased risk to develop chronic bronchitis, a condition characterized by chronic production of phlegm that is also seen in tobacco smokers.Dr. Salathe said the newly published data not only support the earlier clinical report, but help explain it. A single session of vaping can deliver more nicotine to the airways than smoking one cigarette. Moreover, according to Dr. Salathe, absorption into the bloodstream is lower, possibly exposing the airways to high nicotine concentrations for prolonged periods of time.The study also found that nicotine produced these negative effects by stimulating the ion channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1). Blocking TRPA1 reduced the effects of nicotine on clearance in both the human cells in culture and in the sheep.”Vaping with nicotine is not harmless as commonly assumed by those who start vaping, At the very least, it increases the risk of chronic bronchitis.” Dr. Salathe said. “Our study, along with others, might even question e-cigarettes as a harm reduction approach for current smokers with respect to chronic bronchitis/COPD.”center_img This study grew out of our team’s research on the influence of tobacco smoke on mucus clearance from the airways. The question was whether vape containing nicotine had negative effects on the ability to clear secretions from the airways similar to tobacco smoke. “Senior author Matthias Salathe, MD, chair of internal medicine and a professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Centerlast_img read more

Handlers Thought This Owl Was Male for 23 Years —Then He Laid

first_img Plus, Jones said, his sanctuary has no interest in the biological sexes of the birds it takes in. Most of them are rescued from lives as pets or captive working birds, he said. And the sanctuary has no interest in breeding captive owls, only rehabilitating them. “We have 46 birds,” Jones said. “If they have the behavior of a male, we say they’re male. If they have the behavior of a female, we say they’re female.” Typically, according to the National Aviary, Eurasian eagle owl females lay up to six eggs across a month-long period in late winter. [Whooo Knew? 10 Superb Facts About Owls] Kaln never did that though in his 23 years at the sanctuary, Jones said. “He’s always shown signs of being a male,” Jones added. Many of the male birds in the sanctuary “imprint” on their human handlers and treat them as mates, he said. And during breeding season, “Kaln always wants to bonk everything,” he said. Even genetic tests don’t always show a clear distinction between male-sexed owls from female-sexed owls in many species, according to that 2008 paper. Female-sex birds have Z and W chromosomes, while male-sex birds have two Z chromosomes. But those chromosomes can be similar enough that they’re difficult to distinguish. The authors of that paper specifically tried to distinguish the genes of male and female Eurasian eagle owls and failed. The egg hasn’t changed how the sanctuary views Kaln, Jones said. “It’s no different than people. There’s no difference between male and female. We’re all individuals,” he said. “Kaln is an individual. He’s a very special individual. Now we say he’s a tomboy.” The larger concern is that around the same time the bird laid its egg, it began acting “depressed” and displaying some health issues that turned out to be unrelated. Today (June 27), however, Jones said that Kaln has seemed more active and upbeat. “And that’s what really matters isn’t it? The health of the owl,” Jones said. Pretty Bird: Images of a Clever Parrot Kaln inspects his egg. Credit: The Barn Owl Centre An eagle owl named Kaln lived for 23 years at a sanctuary in Gloucester, England. For that whole length of time, its handlers thought it was a male. Then, according to Vincent Jones, founder and trustee of the sanctuary, it laid an egg. The egg wasn’t fertilized, Jones told Live Science, so Kaln won’t get to mother a chick. But still, it was a big surprise to all of Kaln’s handlers. “I think he was just as shocked as we were,” Jones said. [Photos: Salmon-Eating Owls Revealed in Stunning Images]Advertisement Sexing owls is tricky, because males and females outwardly have more or less identical bodies, according to a study published Jan. 24, 2008, in the Journal of Heredity. Unlike mammals and other creatures, there’s no obvious difference even between their genitals. Originally published on Live Science.center_img Happy Feet: A Gallery of Pudgy Penguins Penguin Selfie Offers Bird’s Eye ViewCurious Emperor penguins have been captured in Antarctica getting up close and personal on film. The vision was filmed at the Auster Rookery near Australia’s Mawson research stationAustralian Antarctic expeditioner, Eddie Gault, left the camera on the ice when visiting the rookery, and it didn’t take long for the naturally curious birds to seize the opportunity for a selfie.Credit: Eddie Gault/Australian Antarctic DivisionVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65809-male-seeming-owl-lays-egg.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3700:37Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?02:31Surgical Robotics00:29Video – Giggly Robot关闭  Whooo’s in There? Amazing Images of Owlslast_img read more