Warde unbeaten half-century prop up Leewards

first_imgFLORENCE HALL, Jamaica, (CMC) – Terrance Warde struck an important unbeaten half-century to prop up Leeward Islands Hurricanes and frustrate Jamaica Scorpions on the opening day of their fifth round clash here Thursday.With his side tottering on 146 for seven, Warde carved out 53 to follow up opener Montcin Hodge’s 52, as the visitors closed on 215 for nine at the Trelawny Multi-Purpose Stadium.Crucially, number seven Warde put on 28 for the eighth wicket with Jamaican Damion Jacobs (10) and a further 28 for the ninth wicket with Nino Henry (15), to ensure Hurricanes fought back in the final session.All told, the right-hander struck six fours in an attritional 137-ball knock in 2-¾ hours at the crease.No such rearguard effort appeared necessary with Hurricanes well placed on 92 for two after lunch, with Hodge and left-hander Amir Jangoo (35) involved in a key 39-run, third wicket stand.Seamer Derval Green had earlier hit left-hander opener Kieran Powell in front for nine while fast bowler Nicholson Gordon had also gained an lbw verdict against Devon Thomas (16) after he put on 38 for the second wicket with Hodge.In need of a stand, Hodge and Jangoo saw Hurricanes to lunch on 70 for two and flourished afterwards before off-spinner Pete Salmon broke the stand, getting Hodge to play down the wrong line to a straight ball and trapping him lbw.The right-handed Hodge faced 119 deliveries and counted seven fours in 143 minutes.Jangoo, who counted four fours off 85 balls in nearly two hours, added 25 with captain Jahmar Hamilton (7) before left-arm spinner Patrick Harty sliced through the innings with four for 41, to put Scorpions in command.last_img read more

Wisconsin coaches talk to media

first_imgAs the University of Wisconsin held its weekly press conference Monday, several head coaches were in attendance to talk about their respective teams.First among them was women’s basketball head coach Lisa Stone, who discussed about her team’s upcoming matchup with Ohio State and the Badgers’ chances of making the NCAA Tournament in March.Wisconsin wrestling head coach Barry Davis followed Stone. Davis talked about his team’s final home dual meets that await this weekend against Northwestern and No. 1 Iowa. Iowa is of particular performance as Davis is an alum.Men’s hockey head coach Mike Eaves followed Davis, discussing Wisconsin’s final home series this weekend against St. Cloud State. The series is crucial for the UW because it is the last time the Badgers face a team above them in the WCHA standings.Following Eaves was women’s swimming head coach Eric Hansen, whose squad is preparing for the Big Ten Championship meet this week. Wisconsin is ranked No. 17 nationally and hopes to win the Big Ten title as a precursor to a strong performance at the NCAA meet, which will come in another month.Last, but certainly not least, men’s basketball head coach Bo Ryan talked to members of the media about a range of topics. Among them were his team’s upcoming matchup with Minnesota, the process of returning for junior forward Jon Leuer and the leadership ability of senior guard Jason Bohannon.On the left side of this page you will find the complete audio files of today’s press conference, separated by sport.last_img read more

Santita Ebangwese abandoned a once promising basketball career to play Division I volleyball

first_imgIn her three years at SU, Ebangwese brings vibrancy to the Orange. Before games, Ebangwese yells, dances and does anything that will loosen the team up while still preparing for the game. The senior’s lightheartedness even plays a role in her in-game demeanor.On Oct. 8, 2017, Syracuse held a 20-19 lead in the second set against Georgia Tech. After Yelin challenged a call, every player stood still and waited for the referee’s ruling except for Ebangwese. The middle blocker jived to the music booming over the loudspeaker as if nothing were at stake.“Whatever sport I play, I have energy, especially on game day,” Ebangwese said. “I’m over the top, it’s just what I do.”Though Ebangwese’s thought back to what her basketball career could’ve been, that’s not on her mind anymore. Her focus is on guiding Syracuse to the NCAA tournament in her final season.“You have to be blind not to see it,” Yelin said. “She is so energetic and positive. She always comes to fight. That’s her personality.” As a freshman on the girls varsity volleyball team at Pittsford Sutherland (New York) High School, Santita Ebangwese watched the season from the sidelines, an outcome she was content with. She was a star on the girls varsity basketball team, appearing in 19 games that year and averaging 7.5 points and 9.1 rebounds per game.But after a successful spring with her club volleyball team, the Rochester native started her sophomore season for the Knights as the third-string middle blocker. This time, she refused to accept her role.“I was on the bench,” Ebangwese said. “At the time I understood why, I understood I needed to get better. It was a humbling experience, and I knew I didn’t want to be on the bench ever again.”By the beginning of her junior year, Ebangwese was a starter on the volleyball team and had received several Division I offers. Facebook Twitter Google+ Commentscenter_img Published on September 4, 2018 at 10:51 pm Contact David: ddschnei@syr.edu Her rapid progress in volleyball put basketball, a sport she could’ve played at the Division I level, behind her. Six years later, Ebangwese enters her senior year coming off a season when she led the Orange in kills (331) and hitting percentage (.374) and was named All-ACC First Team.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I’ve thought about it a lot,” Ebangwese said. “Sometimes I miss basketball.”Growing up in Rochester, Ebangwese did everything she could athletically. She ran track, swam, and played soccer, basketball and volleyball until she was 14. Once Ebangwese reached high school, she realized it was impossible to maintain such a rigorous schedule. She chose the two she believed she had a future in: basketball and volleyball.Kevin Camelo | Digital Design EditorShe opted to attend Sutherland rather than a city of Rochester high school to play on more competitive sports teams and receive a better education, she said, which opened the door for recruiting later on.After riding the bench for the volleyball team and receiving substantial playing time for the basketball team her freshman year, Ebangwese thrived in the spring with VolleyFX. The club was a perfect fit for Ebangwese, she said, as it didn’t restrict her participation with the basketball team, something other clubs typically do for multi-sport athletes.“Those (club) coaches were like, ‘You have talent, you should cultivate it.’ They helped me do that,” Ebangwese said. “They found ways to help me balance both club and school and basketball and volleyball.”With VolleyFX, Ebangwese learned the details of volleyball. Along with enhancing her knowledge of the game, she improved the timing of her jumps, conditioning and her quickness in changing direction.While volleyball and basketball have their similarities, Ebangwese said, it took time to develop a skill set specific to volleyball that pushed her to become a Division I-caliber player.“We played on the same club team, we traveled together all the time,” said Aliah Bowllan, an SU junior who played at Sutherland with Ebangwese. “During club season, especially for volleyball, that’s really your time to get a lot better. For (Santita), it was to get ready for high school. She really got a lot better with their VFX.”Though improving in volleyball, Ebangwese stayed committed to basketball. She played in 20 contests for the Knights varsity team in her second year, averaging 7.0 points and 8.3 rebounds per game. By the end of Ebangwese’s sophomore year, colleges recruited her for basketball and volleyball. She pondered offers from Division II schools that wanted her to play both. But she felt attending a Division I school with a strong program in her preferred line of study — engineering — would better prepare her for a career beyond sports.“(Division II schools) knew I played volleyball so they thought it was more enticing to play both,” Ebangwese said. “I was like, ‘I don’t know,’ because I looked at the schools education-wise and thought, ‘Eh.’”In addition to Syracuse, Ebangwese drew interest from “more than seven” Division-I schools including Iowa, Georgia, Georgia State and Tennessee. After completing her official visits, which spanned from the August to February of her junior year, Ebangwese committed to playing volleyball at SU.Kevin Camelo | Digital Design EditorDespite Ebangwese’s official choice, she had no plans to quit basketball. She posted her best season of her high school career as a junior, averaging a double-double.“It was perfectly okay with us if she played basketball,” SU head coach Leonid Yelin said. “I knew it would be right to give her that advice so she didn’t feel pressured to do something she didn’t have to.”In July before her senior year, Notre Dame and West Virginia offered Ebangwese to play basketball — only basketball — but she declined. Her future was in Syracuse.last_img read more