Casella Waste Systems opens compressed natural gas fueling station for its vehicles

first_imgAs part of its ongoing effort at resource conservation, and to explore and deploy clean, fuel-efficient vehicles, Casella Waste Systems today opened a compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station in Chittenden County, its first facility companywide. Natural gas-powered trucks and vehicles are among the cleanest vehicles available and, with the discovery of new natural gas in North America, natural gas prices have decreased significantly.  In addition they also have significantly lowered tailpipe emissions.‘We are thrilled to cut the ribbon on this facility, and to add three natural gas-powered trucks to our fleet,’ John Casella, chairman and chief executive officer of Casella Waste Systems, said.  ‘Several years ago we began to explore replacing existing diesel trucks with natural gas-powered trucks.  We quickly discovered that the environmental and economic benefits were obvious ‘ these vehicles cut particulate emissions by 95% and carbon monoxide by 75%, they’re quieter than traditional diesel engines and, because of the lower cost of natural gas, they offer potential economic savings as well.’ ‘I congratulate Casella Waste Systems on its leadership in becoming an early adopter of cleaner fleet vehicles,’ said Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin.  ‘We have significant opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Vermont through alternative fuel-powered vehicles in the transportation sector. Casella Waste Systems has made an enormous impact by choosing natural gas.  Moving off foreign oil to cleaner alternatives like natural gas is an excellent step that I hope other businesses will examine closely as they build to replace their fleet vehicles,’ Shumlin said. ‘Casella Waste Systems is a thoughtful company, combining positive business practice with respect for the environment,’ said Don Gilbert, President and CEO of Vermont Gas Systems.  ‘While there are many natural gas vehicles in service around the world and in other states, currently Vermont only has a few.  The strong North American based gas supply and its relatively low price combined with our desire to decrease greenhouse gas emissions create a unique opportunity for Vermont.  Casella’s leadership has demonstrated how Vermont businesses can save money and promote a cleaner environment through utilizing natural gas vehicles in their fleets,’ Gilbert said.Casella’s new facility consists of six fueling stations, allowing vehicles to be refueled overnight.  Currently, Casella deploys three CNG-powered (Compressed Natural Gas) vehicles in Chittenden County and expects to take delivery on three more vehicles by mid-summer 2011, at which time 20 percent of the company’s daily collection routes in the county will be serviced by CNG vehicles.While natural gas vehicle (NGV) technology has been available for years, the strong supply outlook and decline in prices for natural gas in North America has made transitioning to NGV’s more economical. Casella plans to add several more CNG-powered vehicles to its fleet this coming year, and has planned to build 2 additional fueling stations in other communities it serves throughout the northeastern US. About Casella Waste Systems, Inc.Casella Waste Systems, Inc., headquartered in Rutland, Vermont, provides solid waste management services consisting of collection, transfer, disposal, and recycling services in the northeastern United States. For further information, contact Joseph Fusco, vice president, at 802-772-2247, or visit the company’s website at http://www.casella.com(link is external). PHOTO: John Casella, Governor Shumlin, Joanna Underwood from Energy Vision, and Don Gilbert. (Vermont Business Magazine)WILLISTON, VT. (May 13, 2011) ‘last_img read more

Contura CEO: It’s possible Eagle Butte, Belle Ayr coal mines will never reopen

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Gillette News Record:Nearly 600 locked-out Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr coal miners waiting for a call to return to work may not get that call.While Contura Energy Inc. continues to negotiate with the federal government to close its deal to buy the mines from bankrupt Blackjewel LLC, the deal may not be completed before Blackjewel runs out of money and has to liquidate the mines. That was one of the takeaways from Contura’s 2019 second quarter earnings call Wednesday morning.If that happens, Contura, which sold the mines to Blackjewel in 2017 and is still on the hook to reclaim them, would move into full reclamation mode, said Andy Eidson, the company’s chief financial officer.Recognizing that the sale “is wholly dependent on reaching an agreement” over federal leases, Blackjewel is “on a pretty tight clock on day-to-day operating funds,” Eidson said. “It’s not an absolute certainty an agreement will be reached before (Blackjewel has to convert its Chapter 11 bankruptcy to) Chapter 7.”Eidson said if that’s the case, Contura has crunched the numbers and believes it can do the required reclamation at the Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr mines for about $100 million over a period of eight to 10 years. While the company has bonded for about $250 million to do that work, the bond amount is a high-end projection of reclaiming the land that includes things like buying expensive equipment Contura already has.The preferred outcome continues to be reaching an agreement with the federal government and reopening the mines, Eidson said. However, Contura also is prepared for the alternative. Going straight to reclamation is “certainly something we would rather not deal with, but if this is the way we have to deal with it, we believe the net impact to the company would be very manageable going forward.”More: Contura not ‘particularly interested’ in PRB long-term Contura CEO: It’s possible Eagle Butte, Belle Ayr coal mines will never reopenlast_img read more

(Updated 3-6-13, 12:35 p.m.) Creston, Iowa man identified in Monday’s shooting; attorney won’t press charges

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (132) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… Commenting Disabled Further commenting on this page has been disabled by the blog admin. You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +15 Vote up Vote down Southerner · 388 weeks ago Don’t mess with the South Report Reply 0 replies · active 388 weeks ago +8 Vote up Vote down Sam · 388 weeks ago Don’t think about crossing through Sumner Ct and do a crime. Don’t think about coming to Sumner Ct to do a crime. We are on our toes. You blooming idiot. Report Reply 1 reply · active 388 weeks ago +16 Vote up Vote down Live on same road · 388 weeks ago I am just glad the farmer didnt use an assult rifle or we would never hear the end of it. Report Reply 0 replies · active 388 weeks ago +22 Vote up Vote down Kansan · 388 weeks ago Good for the homeowner! He made sure he wasn’t another victim or statistic. We need more people like him! Report Reply 3 replies · active 387 weeks ago +3 Vote up Vote down NoName · 388 weeks ago I am very proud of the Farmer! But don’t try and make everyone who lives in Sumner County out be another Ted Nugent. People EVERYWHERE should be on their toes these days! And Yes I am for the south but gave up that fight when I graduated high school and realized there were better things to do and spend time thinking about. Report Reply 0 replies · active 388 weeks ago +10 Vote up Vote down Just Saying… · 388 weeks ago Kansas was a free state and a part of the north. However, I believe the farmer was justified in what he did to protect himself and others. Just pointing out that fact about Kansas. Report Reply 2 replies · active 388 weeks ago -16 Vote up Vote down Bob · 388 weeks ago He was wanted for drug crimes…which can be anything from drug lord to a little bit of weed in his pocket, what was the farmer scared of? Maybe he didn’t want his stash stolen. lol but seriously if i read this right : (The farmer arrived at that home and found it to be secure and learned no one was home. A check of the outbuildings led the farmer to the suspect and the fatal shot was fired. ) He was trying to hide and the farmer should have called the law NO ONE was home and the man ran from him so I’m sure he wasn’t in danger!! we cant have people shooting people unless someone is in danger….I’m sure this wont be a popular post here in Fox News central Report Reply 11 replies · active 387 weeks ago +9 Vote up Vote down Tired of Crime · 388 weeks ago It’s to bad for the loss of life, but the (I’ll be nice) ‘suspect’ made his own choice. Crime does not pay at any level. If a few more of these kinds of situations were made public nationwide then maybe crime would be less. However since a shotgun was used then this will probably start the liberals on a craze of no assault weapons and shotguns. I am so thankful that the farmer did not use a rolling pin on the suspect. Because then they would be outlawed also. Just think no more homemade pies, bread, etc. “Choot em all Bubba”. Report Reply 0 replies · active 388 weeks ago -19 Vote up Vote down Another Farmer · 388 weeks ago When the farmer said this and then pursued him and then fatalily shot the man he took the law into his own hands. The farmer should have backed off and let the authoritys do their job instead of killing the man. Just before 5 p.m., the farmer who would later fire the fatal shot, saw the man coming up the road near the farmer’s home. He approached the suspect and told him to wait there for authorities. The suspect fled on foot and the farmer attempted to follow him in a vehicle. At that point, the farmer saw that the man was headed to a residence owned by relatives of the farmer. The farmer arrived at that home and found it to be secure and learned no one was home. A check of the outbuildings led the farmer to the suspect and the fatal shot was fired. Kerwin Spencer will not be in office long if he does not press charges. Now Mr ***** is trying to change his story to make sure he cant be charged. Report Reply 9 replies · active 387 weeks ago -9 Vote up Vote down Nonya · 388 weeks ago Let’s just get rid of all law officers and just give everyone a gun that would be swell Report Reply 0 replies · active 388 weeks ago 12345Next » Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow and Shane Farley, Newscow.ne — The Sumner County Sheriff’s Office has identified Joseph Lamasters of Creston, Iowa as the man who was shot and killed in Sumner County, Monday afternoon after he allegedly threatened a farmer and his 17-year-old son.According to Creston Police reports, Lamasters, 41, of 400 N. Walnut St. was charged in a major drug bust which had occurred in Union County, about 70 miles southwest of Des Moines, Iowa on March 2, 2012. He was one of 13 arrested in a narcotic investigation brought on by five Iowa drug agencies. He was arrested for delivery of methamphetamine, failure to affix a valid Iowa drug stamp tax and possession of methamphetamine, according to a Creston (Iowa) News Advertiser report.It was unknown why Lamasters was in Kansas Monday that resulted in his death when a Sumner County farmer shot and killed Lamasters following an incident Monday that began on the Kansas Turnpike.Around 5:30 p.m., Monday an unidentified farmer confronted the suspect, who was hiding in an outbuilding at a residence near the 800 block of E. 140th St. South, north of South Haven.The farmer was armed with a shotgun.“The suspect was in the barn and basically attacked the farmer, cussed at him and said I’m going to kill you,” sheriff Darren Chambers said to Newscow.net on Monday. “The farmer, with his son there as a witness, felt in fear of his life and used deadly force to protect himself.”Sumner County Attorney Kerwin Spencer told Sumner Newscow Tuesday morning his office will not be making charges at this time on an incident which occurred late Monday afternoon involving a Sumner County farmer.“The Sheriff contacted me by phone at 6 to 6:15 (Monday) evening and invited me to come out to the scene,” Spencer said. “After briefing me on the situation, I didn’t feel it was necessary for me to go to the scene. I only go to the scene if I feel charges need to be filed.”The suspect had been the subject of an extensive search earlier in the day when he failed to pay his toll on the Kansas Turnpike and authorities learned he was wanted.Chambers told KSN-TV, that authorities began searching for Lamasters around noon Monday when he left his ID at the south terminal of the Kansas Turnpike. Troopers said he was a lane runner which means someone not paying his turnpike fee.He was not armed at the time of the incident, Chambers said.His vehicle, which later was determined to be stolen, was recovered along the turnpike. Chambers thinks that the man may have run out of gas.Authorities assumed the man fled and launched a search, which included air support from highway patrol aircraft.Landowners in the area were alerted by authorities, who went door to door with information about the suspect, Chambers said. An ID the suspect left behind, led to the discovery he was wanted on drug charges in Iowa and had been known to carry weapons with him in the past – thus creating the potential he was armed and dangerous.Authorities suspended their search around 3 p.m. Monday when they couldn’t locate the suspect.“A lot of times these people will wait until it’s dark, steal a car and we’ll find it a couple days later in Texas,” Chambers said. “This guy didn’t wait and he got spotted.”Just before 5 p.m., the farmer, who had been out burning off hedgerow, noticed the suspicious man.The man who fired off the fatal shot told authorities, that he saw the man coming up the road near the farmer’s home. He approached the suspect and told him to wait there for authorities.The suspect fled on foot and the farmer attempted to follow him in a vehicle. At that point, the farmer saw that the man was headed to a residence owned by relatives of the farmer.The farmer arrived at that home and found it to be secure and learned no one was home. A check of the outbuildings led the farmer to the suspect and the fatal shot was fired.The body of Lamasters was removed from the rural property under the direction of the county coroner and underwent an autopsy Tuesday in Wichita.Authorities were en route to the scene at the time the shooting occurred.The Sheriff and Attorney then conferred with one another and determined no charges will be filed.last_img read more

Wellington gets one inch of rain over past 24 hours

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Sumner Newscow report — Wellington received one inch of rain over the past 24 hours. Wellington now has 4.2 inches of rain in the last 48 hours. Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more