As I see the NFL playoff games this weekend here

first_img As I see the NFL playoff games this weekend, here’s the one player I think will be the fulcrum to determine the outcome of the game. Tweet me yours @doug987fm. Comments   Share   GAME 1Kansas City at New EnglandSaturday – 2:35 kickoffEric BerryIn order for the Patriots to win, Tom Brady has to get rid of the ball fast. If Justin Houston and Tamba Hali can be what they used to be when both were healthy, Brady will be looking for short throws to Rob Gronkowski, Julian Edelman and Danny Amendola.  Eric Berry has the chance to come up huge or be torched. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning yells to his team during the second half in an NFL football game against the San Diego Chargers, Sunday, Jan. 3, 2016, in Denver. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey) For the first time in Manning’s career, he must not lose the game. If Manning tries to win the game for the Broncos, Pittsburgh is in the AFC Championship Game. We all love a fairy tale. Manning has been great for the NFL and he’s one of the legends of the game as a player and as a person. He deserves to go out on a white horse (Bronco) and ride into another version of “Manning versus Brady.” There’s just one catch. He can’t physically do what his mind is telling him to do. Denver has a great chance to host the AFC Championship Game as long as Manning plays more like Trent Dilfer and less like Ryan Leaf. GAME 3Seattle at CarolinaSunday – 11:05 kickoffLuke KuechlyEither Kuechly is the best overall LB in the league or there’s a short list of players ahead of him. He can do so many things well but everything he has will be tested against the Seattle offense. The teams have met once this year, but Seattle wasn’t clicking like they are now so that game means very little.If Kuechly stays in to spy Russell Wilson, can he still take away the Seattle crossing routes?  If Kuechly is preoccupied with Wilson’s boots, waggles and read-options, he can’t be as effective as when he simply reads the eyes of the classic drop back passer. There’s going to be so much attention paid to Cam Newton versus the Legion of Boom, and rightly so.  However, if Kuechly has a bad game, Newton won’t be able to cover it up against Seattle’s defense.GAME 4Pittsburgh at DenverSunday – 2:40 kickoffPeyton ManningThis is the easiest one of the four games to narrow it down to one player. What does this man have left?With all the rest, he did look good in the last game of the season.  A Week 17 game can’t erase the 2015 season, though. Manning has contributed very little to the success of the Denver Broncos this year. He wasn’t even a game manager during most of the games. The Denver defense snatched victory from Manning’s jaws of defeat on multiple occasions.center_img Berry must decide when to come to help against the run and diagnose the play fake. Berry can’t let anyone deep down the field but he also must control the dink and dunk that moves the chains. If he plays well, the Chiefs have a chance for their first AFC Championship game appearance since losing to Jim Kelly and the K-Gun in Buffalo two decades ago.GAME 2Green Bay at ArizonaSaturday – 6:15 kickoffEddie LacyThe Cardinals have too many offensive weapons for Green Bay’s defense to completely shut down. This might not be an offensively explosive game, but it certainly won’t be a replay of Vikings/Seahawks. The Packers will need to score to keep up with Arizona’s offense.The play-action pass will be huge for Green Bay and the only way it works is if Lacy runs like he did in the last three quarters of the Packers’ win in Washington.  Lacy can be a stud but he’s been hit-or-miss (mostly miss) for stretches this year. If it’s an arm’s race, I’m taking Carson Palmer. I’m not claiming Carson’s had a better career than Aaron Rodgers, but I’ll take the Cardinals’ offense as a whole every day in 2015.  The Packers can’t win this game without Lacy being a major threat. Top Stories The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

Afendoulis opens Lansing office announces contact information

first_img06Jan Afendoulis opens Lansing office, announces contact information Categories: Afendoulis News State Rep. Chris Afendoulis announced the opening of his Lansing office, along with important contact information for residents to reach out to him.Afendoulis will continue to utilize former Rep. MacGregor’s toll free phone number at 1-855-347-8073 to ensure a smooth transition for residents in the 73rd District. He can also be reached at his Lansing office at (517) 373-0218, via email at ChrisAfendoulis@house.mi.gov, and by mail at P.O. Box 30014, Lansing, MI 48909-7514.“It is important to me that the hard-working taxpayers who sent me to Lansing know I’m here to serve them,” said Afendoulis, R-Grand Rapids Township. “I encourage people to reach out to my office with their thoughts and concerns so that my staff and I can be of assistance at any time.”Legislative staffers Ben Greene and Trevor TenBrink will join Afendoulis in his Lansing office. Greene was previously employed by Rep. MacGregor and has served in the House since 2012. TenBrink is a graduate of Grand Valley State University and has experience interning in U.S. Rep. Bill Huizenga’s office.Rep. Afendoulis’ office is located at 124 N. Capitol Ave., Room 1092, Lansing, MI 48933. The office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.###last_img read more

The German audiovisual advertising market should s

first_imgThe German audiovisual advertising market should see growth of between 3% to 4% this year, taking total sales to €5.7 billion, with TV advertising growing by between 2% and 3% to €4.5 billion, according to figures compiled by the country’s commercial broadcasters’ association, the VPRT.The TV forecast is on the low side relative to the 3% growth achieved last year. However, the market share of the overall advertising market held by TV is set to exceed 30% for the first time, with audiovisual advertising in general accounting for 38% of all advertising, up from 36% last year.Net revenue generated by in-stream video advertising is set to grow by between 25% and 30%, taking its total to €400 million. Overall, says the VPRT, additional investment in TV and video advertising will total about €200 million, with revenues rising by between 4% and 5% to just under €5 billion.Radio advertising is expected to grow at a faster rate than in 2015, rising by between 1% and 2% to over €750 million, while in-stream audio advertising will rise by between 40% and 50% to around €20 million.Claus Grewenig, managing director of VPRT, said: “The figures impressively underscore the relevance of the radio and television industry, also as an economic factor. At the same time, the industry´s overall framework and its development potential are the key concerns of VPRT´s member companies. In view of the concrete results expected from the Federal and State Governments´ Committee on media convergence as well as the discussion on maintaining the freedom to advertise, we expect the political debate to focus on these concerns in 2016.”Frank Giersberg, member of the board of directors and responsible for market and business development at VPRT, said: “High reach is becoming more and more valuable, which is why the industry is boosting its investment in radio and TV. At the same time, the media are investing more than ever before in new content, innovative products and advertising technology. This trend is expected to continue, so that the sector´s overall significance for the German economy will increase even further.”last_img read more

Imagine as Christopher Buckley son of William F

first_imgImagine, as Christopher Buckley (son of William F.) did in his clever book, Boomsday, a plan to make the government solvent by offering incentives for people to kill themselves at age 70 and younger. Instead of calling it suicide, it would euphemistically be known as “Voluntary Transitioning.” Now we have Ezekiel Emanuel, Ari and Rahm’s brother, making quite a splash with his article “Why I Hope to Die at 75” in the Atlantic. While he doesn’t plan on suicide, he will stop receiving medical treatment. He says people deteriorate, and are less productive and creative. So why stay around so long? The former White House aid’s article makes Dr. Elizabeth Lee Vliet’s piece on Casey Research last December all the more interesting. She pointed out that Mr. Emanuel has written plenty about “The Complete Lives System” which: makes crystal clear that physicians must not focus on the individual patient. Instead, medical care should be allocated based on the patient’s usefulness to the “collective good.” If you’re too old, or too young, or your ailment is too complicated, society is better off letting you die rather than paying a doctor to heal you. One tenet of the Complete Lives system is that medical care for people under age 15 and over age 45 should be attenuated. “Attenuate” means to ration. Emanuel believes that the very young and the elderly are less valuable to society than those in the middle of the age curve. Mr. Emanuel is likely trying to start a trend and maybe even plant the idea for legislation to stop caring for people at 75—all for the good of the country, of course. Besides ghoulish, it’s a bit ironic, given the unwillingness of Americans to grow up. It’s telling that Obamacare covers children up to 26, as if the mid-20s is the new teenager. There was no such thing as a teenager before 1941; there were children and there were adults, explains Diana West in her book The Death of the Grown-Up. Now, turning 13 brings on the wonderful, entitled world of being a teen instead of taking a small step toward adulthood, and according to West “due to the permanent hold our culture has placed on the maturation process, that’s where they’re likely to find most adults.” For instance, it turns out more adults watch the Cartoon Network than CNN. And while CNN is a low bar, remembering that my old boss, the CEO of a bank, would constantly watch SpongeBob SquarePants, I can believe this. Ms. West writes that the previous generation was “one not yet under the influence of a youth culture of licentious boys (sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll) and petulant girls (women’s lib), shaped [by] that most basic human instinct—survival. Elevated by a maturing belief in duty, honor, loyalty, and forbearance, the instinct to survive wasn’t just a self-concern; it was, it turned out, the saving grace of civilization.” So what’s happened? Why the societal breakdown? We’ve had Republicans and we’ve had Democrats in charge. It doesn’t matter. It’s inflation and democracy. Both shorten people’s time horizons. As a nation, we live for the moment because our money is constantly degraded and our politicians steal from us continuously. In his masterful examination of the Thomas Mann short story Disorder and Early Sorrow, professor Paul Cantor observes, “Mann is as acute in portraying the psychological effects of inflation as he is in portraying the economic, social and political effects.” Mann shows “inflation fundamentally changes the way people think, forcing them to live for the moment.” With everyone’s time horizons shortened during the Weimar hyperinflation, hard work and prudent investing are believed foolish. In Death and Early Sorrow, the older generation lost its authority and youth dominated. The children acted like adults and the adults acted like children. “The young are more adaptable to changing conditions, while the old are set in their ways,” writes Cantor, “Hence the young cope better with inflation.” Mann saw inflation change the dynamic between generations in society. With “the young [having] a huge advantage over the old,” Cantor explains. “Not having experienced economic stability, the youth of Germany are more able to go with the inflationary flow.” Mann’s principal character, Professor Cornelius, has a servant, young Xaver, who is the perfect inflationary child. Xaver, Mann described, “utterly lacks a sense of duty and can as little be trained to the performance of the daily round and common task as some kinds of dog can be taught to jump over a stick.” Xaver has no feeling for the past and lacks the discipline so prized in Germany. Cantor points out that the elderly “become increasingly irrelevant” in an inflationary environment. It’s well known that inflation especially punishes those on fixed incomes. “Mann fills in our sense of the psychological disruptions that accompany the economic ravages of inflation,” writes Cantor. “More than any other factor, inflation discredits the authority of the older generation and turns power over to youth.” With prices soaring, youthful vices look like wisdom; the conservatism and prudence of the elderly are made to look silly. In his epic Democracy: The God That Failed, Hans-Hermann Hoppe explained that democracy increases societal time preference and with democratic rule “contrary to conventional wisdom, the decivilizing forces inherent in any form of government are systematically strengthened.” The private ownership of government (monarchy) is much more long-term oriented. Rulers may pass on a nation’s wealth to their heirs. In a democracy, politicians can only use government resources. A president has every incentive to maximize current income at the expense of capital value. A president being a temporary caretaker, explains Hoppe, “will use up as much of the government resources as quickly as possible, for what he does not consume now, he may never be able to consume.” And since in a democracy anyone can be president or in government, “public resistance against government power is systematically weakened,” Hoppe writes. “While expropriation and taxation before may have appeared clearly oppressive and evil to the public, they seem much less so, mankind being what it is, once anyone may freely enter the ranks of those who are at the receiving end.” Ever oppressive government and increased taxation make saving for the future look futile. One might as well live for today if what you save will only be confiscated by government. As democracy dictates that the haves take care of the have-nots, “there will be less productive activity, self-reliance and future-orientation, and more consumption, parasitism, dependency and shortsightedness,” Professor Hoppe writes. What democracy and government have done is to retard the natural tendency of humanity to build an expanding stock of capital and durable consumer goods. Man, instead of becoming increasingly more farsighted and providing for ever more distant goals, is tending toward decivilization. As Hoppe describes, “formerly provident providers will be turned into drunks or daydreamers, adults into children, civilized men into barbarians, and producers into criminals.” When someone so powerful as Emanuel, leading by example, advocates for the elderly to get out of the way, society has indeed devolved. Too much money and too much government have turned civilized people into barbaric children.last_img read more

first_img – The Attack America Never Saw Coming Another surprise attack against the U.S. dollar is coming. And soon, too. This attack won’t be from China. Instead, this one will hurt the worst — coming from a sworn “ally” of Americans. Click here to view this short, 60-second message on how to prepare for the next “surprise” currency move. Learn about the realities of identity theft and defend yourself accordingly. Have some or all of your start-over funds hidden. Growing to Fear Black Swans I knew little about risk theory when, in my early 30s, I decided to become wealthy. But even then, I understood that financial predictions rarely seemed to come true, even when they were convincingly argued. So, rather than trying to become an expert at economics or the financial markets, I made a practical plan that I hoped would allow me to create wealth without foresight. I see now that my plan was aimed at becoming antifragile. I bought safe bonds and index funds and real estate. I eventually bought gold, too, but not as a means to make money (which happened) but as a store of wealth and a hedge against inflation. I collected art for the same reason. I figured that the value of my art might go up while other assets were going down. And all the while, I kept investing in small businesses that I understood and could control as a key shareholder. This gave me not only the chance of equity growth but also a steady flow of current income. My plan, in other words, was about what I knew to be happening at the moment than what I thought would happen in the future. I bought gold because I had been reading Bill Bonner. This was back when gold was trading at about $450 per ounce. Without gold in my portfolio, I felt fragile. So I bought gold coins, not to profit from a price surge, but to protect myself. Likewise, I got out of the rental real estate market when prices were getting too high. Everyone was sure prices would keep rising. I wasn’t sure. But if they did crash—as some writers were predicting—I wanted to be safe. So I got out of the market around 2006. Buying gold cost me money. I saw it as an insurance premium…and a cheap one at that. Getting out of the real estate market felt like I was giving up future profits. But I considered that, too, a sort of premium—to protect the profits I’d already made from the properties I owned. Using Taleb’s terms, buying gold and selling real estate was a move to make myself less fragile. The Best Ways to Achieve Financial Antifragility Diversify your assets into at least four and at best six of the following categories: cash, bonds, stocks, gold, options, and rental real estate. If you don’t own a business, start or invest in one. Make sure it is a business that you understand and over which you can have some control. — Invest in quality, dividend-paying stocks. I would define these as antifragile because of the long-term approach, the policy of buying more stock during downturns, and the fact that these stocks rise quickly after drops. Don’t give up your active income. If you don’t have a job now, get one, even if the income is small. Editor’s Note: There are some things in life you can’t predict… In today’s Weekend Edition, Palm Beach Research Group founder Mark Ford argues that no one can know for sure when the next economic disaster will happen. Instead of trying to predict the unpredictable, Mark recommends ten steps you can take to make your finances “antifragile”… How to Survive and Profit From Black Swan Events By Mark Morgan Ford Several years ago Nassim Taleb, author of The Black Swan, came out with a bestselling book called Antifragile. You may have read it. If not, I recommend it. It’s one of those rare books that presents the reader with a feast of delectable ideas. I find myself savoring every page—as much as I might enjoy a bite at a dinner of prime rib, garlic mashed potatoes, and sautéed spinach. Useful facts: Antifragile can be seen as a sequel to The Black Swan, which can be seen as a sequel to Fooled by Randomness. Taleb’s argument is that (a) people underestimate how much randomness there is in life (Fooled by Randomness), (b) the most important events are often unpredictable (The Black Swan), and (c) it is possible to not just protect yourself from such events but also to benefit from them by being antifragile. If I hadn’t read Taleb, I’m sure I would have resisted his ideas. I don’t like the idea that you can’t predict important events. I’d prefer to think that if you had enough data and enough computer power, you could. But Taleb is a nimble thinker and a seductive writer. He loves to poke fun at conventional wisdom—whether it is on the subject of health (cholesterol is bad), economics (the Fed can manage the economy), or traffic regulations (more streetlights mean more safety). In Antifragile, he picks up on the “Black Swan” idea. He argues that there are some things in life we can predict and others that we can’t. But what we can do, Taleb asserts, is determine whether something might be destroyed by an unpredictable event. A glass vase, for example, is likely to be destroyed in an earthquake. A stuffed bear is more likely to survive. So rather than spending time trying to predict the unpredictable, we should try to understand whether our practices, programs, and possessions could be destroyed by Black Swans. And if they can, we should work to change that. One thing we can do is find ways to make our practices, programs and possessions more robust: more likely to survive catastrophic events. An even better thing we can do—and this is the core message of Antifragile—is find ways to profit from Black Swans. Robustness, Taleb says, is the quality of being able to endure ruinous events. A very healthy person, for example, is more likely to survive pneumonia than someone who is sickly. His thesis is that when it comes to the economy (among other things), we should do things that make us antifragile to economic disaster. This is more helpful than trying to predict catastrophes. I’m sure you are thinking that this is just common sense. But as Taleb points out in Antifragile, this is the opposite of what the Fed and many financial experts do. Some financial writers, for example, spend their careers trying to predict how certain political and economic events might forecast the ups and downs of the market. Others, like technical analysts, make market predictions based on patterns they have observed in the past. As a wealth builder, you have a choice. You can adhere to the idea that markets can be timed and search out the best models for predicting them…or accept Taleb’s thesis and become an antifragile investor. How to Beat Wall St. 96.2% of the Time Over the last 8 years, a British ex-banker has been conducting one of the world’s largest investment “experiments.” In its initial testing, 84% of people said this simple strategy would put an extra $5-25k (per year) in their pocket. And now, over the last 4 years this investment strategy has provided a documented 96.2% win rate. Once banned in the UK for 127 straight years, this technique is now completely legal in the UK and America… Click here to find out more… Editor’s Note: Mark’s business partner Tom Dyson is hosting a free training series on “antifragile” income investing this week. Tom’s income strategy works whether markets are going up, down, or sideways. Developed over eight years of testing, it’s a virtual “can’t miss” strategy that has shown to be successful 96.2% of the time. To register for Tom’s free training series, go here now… Create a “start-over” fund that is equal to at least six months’ income. Also, have a “start-over” plan. It must be enough to cover your projected costs of starting over. Get insurance—but only what you really need—to protect your health, your house, and all of your other valuable possessions. Develop your cash-producing assets (options, performance stocks, bonds, and rental real estate) so that, in time, each one will give you ample yearly income. Get privacy guards for all of your Internet activities. Recommended Linkslast_img read more

Disabled young people have told MPs how they have

first_imgDisabled young people have told MPs how they have been “cheated” by the government’s new system for supporting pupils and students through school and college.MPs on the Commons educationcommittee heard howdisabled pupils were being denied a voice in drawing up their education, healthand care plans (EHCPs), and how they were not receiving what had been promisedin those plans.Thecommittee also heard that EHCPs were too focused on education, rather thanbeing “life focused”.Thecommittee heard from seven disabled young people on Tuesday as part of itsinquiry into the impact of the special educational needs and disabilities(SEND) reforms introduced by the government through its Children and FamiliesAct 2014*.Three of them – Jordan, Ben and Eva (pictured, centre, left and right) – were part of the RIP: STARS research team, a project led by disabled young people and researchers at Coventry University, which also included support from The Alliance for Inclusive Education, and looked at the quality of EHCPs and whether they met disabled children and young people’s rights.Jordan saidsome of their findings had been “stunning”, and that he and many other disabledyoung people “feel we were cheated out of the education system and treatedpoorly by them”.He said theymade the “atrocious” discovery that disabled children “weren’t actually beinginvolved in the process of their EHCPs”, with the main discussions taking place“without talking to the child themselves”.He saidplans were “either being delayed, mistaken, poorly done and they are notmeeting the needs of the child”, and he called for something to be done toensure that plans “are being carried out correctly by staff” and “not justignored and forgotten”.Eva, anothermember of RIP: STARS, said: “We found out that what was written in the plan wasnot being followed through, so many children aren’t receiving the support andthe correct education that they need and they are missing out on theireducation and childhood.”She said theplans were not preparing disabled children and young people for independenceand adulthood.Eva said theplans should use the language of the social model of disability “so childrenare not defined by labels and they are not seen as a problem”. She added:“Disabled children have a right to mainstream education, so they should achievesupport to achieve this and be in mainstream education if they choose to doso.”Ben, a thirddisabled young person from RIP: STARS, said EHCPs were “too educational focusedand not life focused, so children are not receiving the support they need inother important areas such as developing independence, having choice andcontrol, achieving aspirations, life goals, friends, access in the community.”He said itwas not right that disabled pupils who do not fit in with the “norms and rolesand rules of education” were often “shipped off, excluded, offloaded, or hiddenin other places” and “forgotten about”.Francesca,one of two deaf pupils on the National Deaf Children’s Society’s (NDCS) young people’s advisory boardwho gave evidence, told the committee that a lack of support at school meantshe missed out on social situations and on learning “how to be confident andempowered”.She said shehad even been encouraged to use a separate “SEND room” at lunch, which alsomade it harder to build friendships with non-disabled pupils.She said:“It’s showing to the other students that these people need to be kept separate,which I feel is the wrong attitude completely. “It shouldbe about inclusivity and empowering those people.”Francescasaid that meetings about EHCPs sometimes happened without the disabled youngperson being present.She said:“It’s really frustrating because you feel you can make your own decisionsbecause it is your own support.”Anothermember of the NDCS advisory board, Ella, said she was “really struggling” tosecure the support she needed through the EHCP process, with the local councilcurrently refusing to provide her with a plan because it did not think she wasdeaf enough. As a result,she said, her grades were “far below what they should be”.And she saidthe only people the council would listen to were her parents, and not her.Simran, whois studying accountancy and management at Queen Mary University of London and waswith the charity my AFK, said: “As a disabled woman, I have to work harder thaneveryone else to achieve anything.“I thinkit’s a great shame that young people with SEND are left unsupported and theirachievements are unappreciated. “I’m a 21-year-oldstudying accountancy and I want to be an accountant, I want to work, I want tocontribute to the economy and society, but I feel like there’s not very manyopportunities for me to do so.”Kashifa, whois studying at college and was also with my AFK, said she had received “a lotmore support” when she was at school.She said:“Even though we had meetings about me going to college, I’m not sure theyreally understood my needs when I got there. “I thinkpeople make a judgement about what you’re capable of based on your appearance. “I knowpeople mean well and they know you get anxious in certain situations, and theywant to try to protect you, but this just means you won’t be able to tryanything because people think you won’t be able to cope, so the opportunitiesstop.”She added:“I don’t need people to tell me I need to be realistic, either. “I want towork things out for myself and then be able to make the choice. “I don’tneed to be protected all the time, I just need the chance to try differentthings and then I can decide.”*Under government reforms which came into effect in September 2014, local authorities in England had until April 2018 to move all disabled children and young people eligible for support from SEN statements to new EHCPs. The plans last from birth to the age of 25 and set out all the support they should receive across education, health and social care.A note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

New York City Caves on Plan to Cap Uber Drivers

first_imgRegulations Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Next Article New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, under pressure from business groups, citizens and high-profile celebrities and entrepreneurs, has backed off of a plan that would have limited the number of cars Uber could manage in the city.Under an agreement, first reported by The New York Times, New York will instead conduct a four-month study on the effect of Uber and other non-yellow-cab companies on the city’s traffic and environment. A city council bill to impose a cap on the number of Uber cars will be scrapped for now.”We’re pleased to have reached an agreement with Mayor de Blasio’s administration and the City Council to collaborate on a joint transportation study and to work together on ways to continue expanding economic opportunity, mobility and transportation access in the city,” said Josh Mohrer, general manager of Uber NYC, in a statement. “We are pleased new drivers will continue to be free to join the for-hire industry and partner with Uber.”New York wanted what some saw as onerous regulations, capping Uber’s growth, as well as the prospects for rivals like Lyft. Under the proposed plan that has been shelved, Uber would have been required to stay within the city’s limits, which would allow car bases larger than 500 vehicles to increase by only 1 percent each year.Related: What Uber Has Learned About Expansion, Hurdles and Growing PainsDe Blasio had said curbing Uber was necessary for environmental issues. But actual riders balked, saying New York’s yellow (and green) cabs were notoriously unavailable and lacked the convenience of Uber, which has arguably the best ride-sharing and ride-hailing app. De Blasio’s plan was universally unpopular. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a fellow Democrat, was against it. Several celebrities pressured de Blasio, who has earned distrust from the New York entrepreneurial community for what some perceive as an anti-business stance and pro-regulation stance by his administration. Ashton Kutcher, an Uber investor, has been among the loudest critics, but others, like actor Neil Patrick Harris and supermodel Kate Upton have also weighed in.It even became a civil rights issue, as some black residents said Uber solved the problem of cab drivers intentionally avoiding picking up black passengers.Uber has become the symbol of innovation and disruption in an industry, changing the way many people travel in major cities around the world. But that has clashed with entrenched and heavily regulated industries like taxis, who pay cities high fees for licenses to operate. This has caused Uber and its supporters to claim cities are engaging in regulatory capture, where governments protect the special interests of the groups over which they have the most regulation, at the expense of more innovative approaches to solve problems.Related: Chipotle Raises Prices in San Francisco After Minimum Wage Hike Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Enroll Now for $5 Editor-at-Large Guest Writer Image credit: Shutterstock | Enhanced by Entrepreneurcenter_img July 22, 2015 –shares 3 min read Add to Queue Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand New York City Caves on Plan to Cap Uber Drivers Ray Hennesseylast_img read more

Canada Goose just reported its first revenue miss since it went public

first_img Email Share this storyCanada Goose just reported its first revenue miss since it went public — and the stock is plunging Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Recommended For YouBank of Canada expected to part ways with central bankers around the world todayJapan to lead development of SWIFT network for cryptocurrency -sourceU.S. Senator Schumer asks FBI, FTC to probe Russia’s FaceApp over security concernsChina’s cross-border capital flows will remain basically stable in H2-regulatorNickel strikes 1-yr highs as rally picks up speed Canada Goose Holdings Inc. reported quarterly revenue that missed analysts’ estimates, reigniting concerns that the luxury parka maker’s meteoric growth era is ending. Shares plunged in early New York trading.The company reported fourth-quarter revenue of $156.2 million, below analysts’ average estimate of $158.9 million. That’s the first revenue miss since Canada Goose went public in 2017. While adjusted profit beat expectations, the rare revenue miss may raise concerns about the demand for its products. May 29, 20199:09 AM EDT Filed under News Retail & Marketing Comment Facebook Concerns that the luxury parka maker’s meteoric growth era is ending.Christinne Muschi/Bloomberg Canada Goose just reported its first revenue miss since it went public — and the stock is plunging Is the luxury parka maker’s meteoric growth era ending? Bloomberg News Join the conversation → More Sandrine Rastello 3 Comments Reddit Twitter Canada Goose also said that revenue would rise at least 20 per cent this fiscal year — less than analysts’ 26 per cent forecasts — and predicted eight new stores by the end of the winter selling season. Adjusted net income per share will rise at least 25 per cent, also short of the 29 per cent growth forecast from analysts.Key InsightsFourth-quarter gross margins of 66 per cent beat analysts’ expectations, easing concerns that arose in February, when the impact of Ontario’s minimum wage increase took investors by surprise and sent the stock lower. Canada Goose also updated longer-term guidance. It now expects margins before interest and taxes to grow by 100 basis point between 2019 and 2022 and average revenue growth of 20 per cent.Related Stories:Micron revenue beats, sees signs of improving demandSchlumberger Announces Second-Quarter 2019 ResultsWalgreens third-quarter profit falls 23.6%Market ReactionCanada Goose U.S. shares dropped 14 per cent in premarket trading in New York. While they’re up 12 per cent this year through Tuesday’s close, that’s still about 27 per cent below levels preceding news of the arrest of Huawei Technologies Co.’s finance chief in Vancouver, which sparked a diplomatic row between Canada and China.Bloomberg.com last_img read more

Dating app Grindr faces fury for sharing HIV data Update

Grindr founder and CEO Joel Simkhai attends an event at Milk Studios in Hollywood, California, in October 2015 ‘Key role’ of appsApproximately 1.1 million people in the United States live with HIV, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—among them an estimated 166,000 people unaware of their status. The CDC recommends that everyone ages 13 to 64 get routine annual HIV testing, adding that sexually active gay and bisexual men could benefit from more frequent tests. In 24 US states people aware that they are HIV positive are legally mandated to tell partners, according to the health agency.AIDES, a French HIV-advocacy organization, called for boycotting Grindr in light of the news—but emphasized that sharing HIV status on a dating app before meeting can “allow HIV-positive people to avoid a possible rejection when they announce it verbally,” helping to “normalize the perception and image of HIV-positive people.”Dan Wohlfeiler, a public health expert who directs the organization Building Healthy Online Communities, said open conversations about HIV are vital—and “apps play a key role in helping those conversations happen.””We also hope that apps help users make informed decisions as to how their data are being kept safe.”Natasha Babazadeh, a law fellow at the Electronic Privacy Information Center, emphasized that Grindr must be transparent about how it is using the data or risk losing consumer trust.”Just as users have begun deleting their Facebook accounts after the Cambridge Analytica controversy, dating app users will similarly delete or extensively restrict their use of such apps,” she said in a statement to AFP. “If corporations fail to protect their users’ data they will face the ramifications, legally, financially and socially.”For his part, Danny said he “will think twice before using Grindr again.””There are plenty of ones that gay men can use that aren’t sharing our HIV status,” he said. “These are the ones I’d turn to first.” Experts had greeted with enthusiasm efforts from the self-proclaimed world’s largest gay dating app to promote regular HIV testing and status disclosure—but the effort backfired badly with the revelation that Grindr was sharing the data, prompting calls for a boycott. Explore further Citation: Dating app Grindr faces fury for sharing HIV data (Update) (2018, April 3) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-gay-dating-app-grindr-hiv.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Grindr, the social networking app, can be an effective way to distribute HIV home-testing kits, study finds © 2018 AFP The West Hollywood, California-based dating app, which claims 3.6 million daily active users globally, confirmed Monday it had been sharing users’ personal data—including HIV status—with third party software vendors.The revelation dovetails with a furor over lax personal data protection at Facebook.The social media giant has come under withering scrutiny since it became known that a British consulting firm, Cambridge Analytica, harvested tens of millions of its users’ personal data to create voter profiles for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.Grindr chief technology officer Scott Chen sought to distance the dating app’s public relations mishap from the Facebook scandal, calling the sharing no more than “industry standard practice.” He said Apptimize and Localytics, the companies that used Grindr’s data, were simply tasked with software optimization and “under strict contractual terms that provide for the highest level of confidentiality, data security, and user privacy.”But a wave of advocacy organizations and users say the revelations are a serious violation of trust and privacy—with some worrying the news could undercut recommendations from HIV prevention experts to regularly get tested and disclose HIV status with potential sexual partners.One Grindr user who identified himself as Danny said he originally thought the dating app’s option to disclose HIV status was “great,” also lauding frequent reminders on the app to get tested.”As an HIV negative man, I still had lingering anti-HIV sentiments, but with these blatant disclosures, I was forced to learn,” he told AFP. “I really thought that Grindr cared about the gay community, and was forcing us to have an important dialogue about our health and safety.”He called Grindr’s sharing of the data “a slap in the face.””It’s sad, because I think that it did drive important conversations within our community.”The AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) echoed that sentiment, calling Grindr’s data-sharing “an egregious breach of confidentiality laws,” demanding it “immediately cease and desist the reckless practice.””It is extremely unfortunate that those men who have been courageous enough to share their HIV status, be it positive or negative, on their Grindr profiles, may have now had that most personal data indiscriminately shared by Grindr,” said Michael Weinstein, the AHF president. read more

Tiny Fighting Worms Make One of the Loudest Sounds in the Ocean

first_img The 10 Strangest Animal Discoveries Strange Love: 10 Animals with Truly Weird Courtship Rituals Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoBeverly Hills MDTop Plastic Surgeon: “You Can Fill In Wrinkles At Home” (Here’s How)Beverly Hills MDUndoInfinityKloudPrevent A Data Disaster. This Smart USB Keeps Your Files Safe.InfinityKloudUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndo 13 Extremely Weird Animal Feet Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65945-tiny-worms-emit-loud-noise.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball01:09Robots to the Rescue02:27Robotic Arms关闭 Tiny, feisty worms that live off the coast of Japan fight by headbutting each other — and they aren’t quiet about it. During these feuds, the worms emit one of the loudest sounds in the ocean, according to a new study. The source of the underwater hullabaloo is a nearly transparent segmented worm called the Leocratides kimuraorum, which lives inside sponges 279 to 554 feet (85 to 169 meters) deep off the coast of Japan. [The 12 Weirdest Animal Discoveries]Advertisement These wigglies are just a tad more than an inch (29 millimeters) long and have lengthy tentacles and a big mouth (literally). These seemingly quiet creatures revealed their true nature under the spotlight in the lab. A group of researchers used an instrument called a hydrophone to record 15 pops that were emitted from three kimuraorums as they were fighting. In a marine feud researchers dub “mouth-fighting,” the worms approached each other headfirst with their mouths open. During such encounters, the worms’ pharynx muscles expand rapidly, creating a cavitation bubble that collapses and produces a loud “pop” while the worms launch into each other. The researchers found that these pops can reach 157 decibels in the water (which is a different measurement than decibels in the air). From right next to the water tank, the pops sounded like humans snapping their fingers, lead author Goto Ryutaro, an assitant professor at Kyoto University told Live Science. “Though they probably sound louder if you hear them in the water.” The worms are as loud as snapping shrimps, which are one of the biggest noisemakers in the ocean, the authors wrote. What’s more, they found that these worms did not make any noise when simply disturbed, they only did so when they were fighting. They “may use mouth-fighting to defend territory or living chambers from other worms,” the authors wrote July 8 in the journal Current Biology. “A loud pop may be a byproduct of the rapid mouth attack, but it may also aid intraspecific communication.” A loud noise could somehow determine the victor of the fight or even reveal the whereabouts of nearby worms, they wrote.last_img read more

Kamala Harris Makes Case Against Trump at Brooklyn Fundraiser

first_imgThe line to enter a fundraiser for U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris stretched around a sweltering block in Williamsburg last Wednesday night, as the former California prosecutor became the latest Democratic presidential hopeful to expand her beachhead in New York. The crowd included a few players in state politics, like state Sen. Kevin Parker, a Democrat from Brooklyn, and Emily Giske, a lobbyist and vice chair of the Democratic State Committee. A Harris aide said more than 1,000 people packed Brooklyn Bowl for drinks, dancing and…last_img