Legislators Join Gov. Wolf in Call for Masking

first_img July 07, 2020 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Legislators Join Gov. Wolf in Call for Maskingcenter_img Press Release,  Public Health State and federal officials joined Governor Tom Wolf in reminding Pennsylvanians to wear a mask to reduce the likelihood of spreading COVID-19.“As we increasingly resume public activities in our commonwealth, we need to remain vigilant about taking precautions, especially wearing a mask that covers our noses and mouths while around other people,” said Gov. Wolf. “This is an easy, yet important action that has been shown by research to reduce the spread of COVID-19.”The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advised people to wear a cloth mask to help slow the spread of COVID-19. The CDC’s website offers directions for easy-to-make masks, with patterns for sew and no-sew masks made from everyday household materials.“Public health experts continue to recommend mask-wearing in public, and ongoing research continues to support that recommendation,” said U.S. Sen. Bob Casey. “When you wear a mask, you are sending a clear message to others in your community that you care about them and their well-being as much as your own. I know that if we each do our part, we will beat this virus and be able to start safely rebuilding together.”“Since late March, I have been making the case for Pennsylvanians to wear masks when they venture out,” said U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey. “As the commonwealth continues to re-open, mask wearing has taken on increased significance, as studies continue to affirm that masks helps slow the spread of the coronavirus. Put simply, wearing a mask is an important step that we, as Pennsylvanians, can take to protect one another – as my mask protects you, and your mask protects me.”“The simple act of wearing a mask is how we protect everyone’s health and the fastest course to restoring our economy,” said state Sen. Pam Iovino. “Wearing a mask demonstrates concern for the welfare of all of us and how we get through this crisis together.”“Wearing a mask is vital to protect the health and safety of our community,” said state Rep. Melissa Shusterman. “As our state moves back to the green phase, it is the most important step we can take to preserve the progress we’ve made as a state through this crisis. As Pennsylvanians, we all need to participate in wearing masks to care for our neighbors, and so that our economy and state can continue to make a strong recovery.”Sec. of Health Dr. Rachel Levine signed an order mandating mask-wearing on July 1. It remains in effect. Frequently Asked Questions about the mask-wearing order can be found here.Ver esta página en español.last_img read more

Otto Energy declines Byron’s proposal for Gulf of Mexico well drilling

first_imgAustralia-based oil and gas company Otto Energy has decided that it will not be participating in the drilling of Byron Energy’s SM 71 F4 well in the Gulf of Mexico.SM 71 F platform; Source: ByronIn late August, Byron proposed the SM 71 F4 well, a D5 Sand extension well designated the Sausage prospect, to its 50-50 partner Otto Energy.Under the terms of the SM 71 offshore operating agreement, Otto had until September 30 to respond. Byron was notified that Otto elected not to participate in the drilling of the well.According to the company, the well was assigned a gross 1.26 million barrels of oil and 0.75 bcf of gas. Under the SM 71 operating agreement, Byron has 120 days to spud the SM 71 F4 well.Byron said that it also submitted an authority for expenditure to Otto for a compressor upgrade to the jointly owned SM 71 F platform.Otto approved the compressor upgrade to minimize production downtime while drilling. The two companies agreed the SM 71 F4 well would not be drilled until after the new compressor was.The compressor is expected to be installed in late November or early December this year while Byron expects to spud the SM 71 F4 well in January of 2020 with completion operations to follow immediately if the well is successful. Since Otto refused to participate in the well drilling, Byron will take up 100 percent of the drilling expenses.It is worth noting that the SM 71 F4 well is fully permitted and ready to drill and it is anticipated that the Enterprise 263 rig will be used for the drilling.Also, during the 30-day election period, Byron and Otto discussed the SM 71 F5 well. Byron will submit the SM 71 F5 authority for expenditure and proposal in due course.The company added that if the next well was not successful, the well would be left in a manner that it could be used for future wells such as the SM 71 F5 well by side-tracking below surface casing.Maynard V. Smith, Byron CEO, said: “The SM 71 F4 well is an attractive target from both a reserve and risk standpoint and we look forward to drilling it early next year.“Our seismic data does a very good job of delineating the Sausage prospect and if successful, will increase D5 Sand reserves.“We are disappointed that Otto will not be a part of this well, but this is the right time to drill and bring on new production in the life cycle of the SM 71 platform and project.”Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

Santita Ebangwese abandoned a once promising basketball career to play Division I volleyball

first_imgIn her three years at SU, Ebangwese brings vibrancy to the Orange. Before games, Ebangwese yells, dances and does anything that will loosen the team up while still preparing for the game. The senior’s lightheartedness even plays a role in her in-game demeanor.On Oct. 8, 2017, Syracuse held a 20-19 lead in the second set against Georgia Tech. After Yelin challenged a call, every player stood still and waited for the referee’s ruling except for Ebangwese. The middle blocker jived to the music booming over the loudspeaker as if nothing were at stake.“Whatever sport I play, I have energy, especially on game day,” Ebangwese said. “I’m over the top, it’s just what I do.”Though Ebangwese’s thought back to what her basketball career could’ve been, that’s not on her mind anymore. Her focus is on guiding Syracuse to the NCAA tournament in her final season.“You have to be blind not to see it,” Yelin said. “She is so energetic and positive. She always comes to fight. That’s her personality.” As a freshman on the girls varsity volleyball team at Pittsford Sutherland (New York) High School, Santita Ebangwese watched the season from the sidelines, an outcome she was content with. She was a star on the girls varsity basketball team, appearing in 19 games that year and averaging 7.5 points and 9.1 rebounds per game.But after a successful spring with her club volleyball team, the Rochester native started her sophomore season for the Knights as the third-string middle blocker. This time, she refused to accept her role.“I was on the bench,” Ebangwese said. “At the time I understood why, I understood I needed to get better. It was a humbling experience, and I knew I didn’t want to be on the bench ever again.”By the beginning of her junior year, Ebangwese was a starter on the volleyball team and had received several Division I offers. Facebook Twitter Google+ Commentscenter_img Published on September 4, 2018 at 10:51 pm Contact David: ddschnei@syr.edu Her rapid progress in volleyball put basketball, a sport she could’ve played at the Division I level, behind her. Six years later, Ebangwese enters her senior year coming off a season when she led the Orange in kills (331) and hitting percentage (.374) and was named All-ACC First Team.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I’ve thought about it a lot,” Ebangwese said. “Sometimes I miss basketball.”Growing up in Rochester, Ebangwese did everything she could athletically. She ran track, swam, and played soccer, basketball and volleyball until she was 14. Once Ebangwese reached high school, she realized it was impossible to maintain such a rigorous schedule. She chose the two she believed she had a future in: basketball and volleyball.Kevin Camelo | Digital Design EditorShe opted to attend Sutherland rather than a city of Rochester high school to play on more competitive sports teams and receive a better education, she said, which opened the door for recruiting later on.After riding the bench for the volleyball team and receiving substantial playing time for the basketball team her freshman year, Ebangwese thrived in the spring with VolleyFX. The club was a perfect fit for Ebangwese, she said, as it didn’t restrict her participation with the basketball team, something other clubs typically do for multi-sport athletes.“Those (club) coaches were like, ‘You have talent, you should cultivate it.’ They helped me do that,” Ebangwese said. “They found ways to help me balance both club and school and basketball and volleyball.”With VolleyFX, Ebangwese learned the details of volleyball. Along with enhancing her knowledge of the game, she improved the timing of her jumps, conditioning and her quickness in changing direction.While volleyball and basketball have their similarities, Ebangwese said, it took time to develop a skill set specific to volleyball that pushed her to become a Division I-caliber player.“We played on the same club team, we traveled together all the time,” said Aliah Bowllan, an SU junior who played at Sutherland with Ebangwese. “During club season, especially for volleyball, that’s really your time to get a lot better. For (Santita), it was to get ready for high school. She really got a lot better with their VFX.”Though improving in volleyball, Ebangwese stayed committed to basketball. She played in 20 contests for the Knights varsity team in her second year, averaging 7.0 points and 8.3 rebounds per game. By the end of Ebangwese’s sophomore year, colleges recruited her for basketball and volleyball. She pondered offers from Division II schools that wanted her to play both. But she felt attending a Division I school with a strong program in her preferred line of study — engineering — would better prepare her for a career beyond sports.“(Division II schools) knew I played volleyball so they thought it was more enticing to play both,” Ebangwese said. “I was like, ‘I don’t know,’ because I looked at the schools education-wise and thought, ‘Eh.’”In addition to Syracuse, Ebangwese drew interest from “more than seven” Division-I schools including Iowa, Georgia, Georgia State and Tennessee. After completing her official visits, which spanned from the August to February of her junior year, Ebangwese committed to playing volleyball at SU.Kevin Camelo | Digital Design EditorDespite Ebangwese’s official choice, she had no plans to quit basketball. She posted her best season of her high school career as a junior, averaging a double-double.“It was perfectly okay with us if she played basketball,” SU head coach Leonid Yelin said. “I knew it would be right to give her that advice so she didn’t feel pressured to do something she didn’t have to.”In July before her senior year, Notre Dame and West Virginia offered Ebangwese to play basketball — only basketball — but she declined. Her future was in Syracuse.last_img read more