Salvadoran Army Brings Healthcare Services to Disabled Veterans

first_img“I am filled with happiness because, thanks to the Armed Forces, I now have a new pair of crutches so I can walk better; they repaired my prosthesis; and they gave me the medicine I need for the pain in my leg,” Linares said. “My companions and I are grateful.” Infantry Colonel Sifrido Rivas Peña, the DM-9 commander for the department of La Paz, believes that the healthcare services and equipment provided during the medical outreach days are very valuable because they can also deliver wheelchairs to disabled veterans so they can be more independent. The Armed Forces Social Welfare Institute and the Wounded and Disabled Combat Veterans Fund contribute to these efforts by updating the database of those wounded or disabled during the armed conflict. This information is useful for creating new projects to benefit the program clients. Comprehensive support for veterans and their families UCADFA also helps Military personnel by promoting the inherent rights and liberties of persons with disabilities. The organization promotes the full participation of disabled people in Salvadoran society. Among those who obtained family healthcare was Norma Martínez, 45, the wife of a combat-wounded veteran; she brought her 7- and 12-year-old children so they could receive basic dental care. But he wept with joy at receiving free medical treatment during a comprehensive medical outreach day on April 7 at the facilities of the General Tomás Regalado 1st Infantry Brigade of the Salvadoran Armed Forces (FAES) in the department of Santa Ana. Linares and Velasco were among about 500 injured or disabled people who received medical treatment from specialists with the Ministry of Health’s Comprehensive Basic Healthcare System (SIBASI), who provide continuing humanitarian support to the Armed Forces. Comprehensive support for veterans and their families By Dialogo May 01, 2015 Healthcare services and equipment such as wheelchairs help injured veterans become and remain independent. UCADFA will develop more medical campaigns, Col. Pérez said, with the goal of bringing healthcare services to where the disabled persons live, to promote a healthy lifestyle, and to improve the quality of life for them and their families. Linares and Velasco were among about 500 injured or disabled people who received medical treatment from specialists with the Ministry of Health’s Comprehensive Basic Healthcare System (SIBASI), who provide continuing humanitarian support to the Armed Forces. The family members also received treatment from ophthalmologists, dentists, pediatricians, and psychologists. A team of specialists in viral diseases formed working groups to show people obtaining services the best hygienic practices and how to maintain a healthy environment at home. “We provide support for these Armed Forces activities because we can bring them healthcare services directly, be it general medicine or dentistry, or specialized care for the disabled,” said Dr. Juan Héctor Jubis, a SIBASI representative. “As an institution, we always support them.” “We bring healthcare services to the entire family of disabled persons or wounded veterans, because we know that many of them have mobility problems and their families are in no position to transport them,” Col. Pérez said. More independence for veterans The Armed Forces Social Welfare Institute and the Wounded and Disabled Combat Veterans Fund contribute to these efforts by updating the database of those wounded or disabled during the armed conflict. This information is useful for creating new projects to benefit the program clients. “I’m happy, because my children had a dental cleaning and they filled some molars that had cavities. Our family has limited income, and we could not have paid for the treatment or medications. We are grateful to the Armed Forces for this humanitarian gesture,” Martínez said at the end of the appointment. Veteran José Velasco, 51, is among the former Soldiers filled with gratitude. “I am completely indebted to the Armed Forces for bringing us everything we needed to receive treatment,” he said. “My children received the vaccinations and vitamins they needed. We defended the country and, even though we were wounded, we are proud to belong to these Armed Forces.” “What we are trying to do is help these men who, at the time, defended their country even though it cost them their very lives,” said Col. Rivas. “Therefore, we must not abandon them. On the contrary, the Armed Forces gives them every assistance they can.” Roberto Linares, a 54-year-old veteran of the Salvadoran Armed Forces who lost one of his legs from a gunshot wound that became infected during the armed conflict of the 1980s, used to walk with difficulty because his prosthesis was damaged. But he wept with joy at receiving free medical treatment during a comprehensive medical outreach day on April 7 at the facilities of the General Tomás Regalado 1st Infantry Brigade of the Salvadoran Armed Forces (FAES) in the department of Santa Ana. Infantry Colonel Sifrido Rivas Peña, the DM-9 commander for the department of La Paz, believes that the healthcare services and equipment provided during the medical outreach days are very valuable because they can also deliver wheelchairs to disabled veterans so they can be more independent. UCADFA will develop more medical campaigns, Col. Pérez said, with the goal of bringing healthcare services to where the disabled persons live, to promote a healthy lifestyle, and to improve the quality of life for them and their families. The Armed Forces Professional Rehabilitation Center (CERPROFA) also provides support to wounded veterans by repairing prostheses and delivering bandages, canes, crutches, walkers, and other items. The family members also received treatment from ophthalmologists, dentists, pediatricians, and psychologists. A team of specialists in viral diseases formed working groups to show people obtaining services the best hygienic practices and how to maintain a healthy environment at home. “I’m happy, because my children had a dental cleaning and they filled some molars that had cavities. Our family has limited income, and we could not have paid for the treatment or medications. We are grateful to the Armed Forces for this humanitarian gesture,” Martínez said at the end of the appointment. That support was evident during a day of outreach, in which medical professionals treated combat-wounded veterans and also provided healthcare to family members of the injured Soldiers. Treating families is one of the Salvadoran Armed Forces’ priorities, said Colonel Luis Pérez Carbajal, Chief of the Coordination and Disabled Support Unit of the Armed Forces (UCADFA). Among those who obtained family healthcare was Norma Martínez, 45, the wife of a combat-wounded veteran; she brought her 7- and 12-year-old children so they could receive basic dental care. That support was evident during a day of outreach, in which medical professionals treated combat-wounded veterans and also provided healthcare to family members of the injured Soldiers. Treating families is one of the Salvadoran Armed Forces’ priorities, said Colonel Luis Pérez Carbajal, Chief of the Coordination and Disabled Support Unit of the Armed Forces (UCADFA). UCADFA also helps Military personnel by promoting the inherent rights and liberties of persons with disabilities. The organization promotes the full participation of disabled people in Salvadoran society. The Armed Forces Professional Rehabilitation Center (CERPROFA) also provides support to wounded veterans by repairing prostheses and delivering bandages, canes, crutches, walkers, and other items. Roberto Linares, a 54-year-old veteran of the Salvadoran Armed Forces who lost one of his legs from a gunshot wound that became infected during the armed conflict of the 1980s, used to walk with difficulty because his prosthesis was damaged. More independence for veterans Healthcare services and equipment such as wheelchairs help injured veterans become and remain independent. Veteran José Velasco, 51, is among the former Soldiers filled with gratitude. “I am completely indebted to the Armed Forces for bringing us everything we needed to receive treatment,” he said. “My children received the vaccinations and vitamins they needed. We defended the country and, even though we were wounded, we are proud to belong to these Armed Forces.” “What we are trying to do is help these men who, at the time, defended their country even though it cost them their very lives,” said Col. Rivas. “Therefore, we must not abandon them. On the contrary, the Armed Forces gives them every assistance they can.” “I am filled with happiness because, thanks to the Armed Forces, I now have a new pair of crutches so I can walk better; they repaired my prosthesis; and they gave me the medicine I need for the pain in my leg,” Linares said. “My companions and I are grateful.” “We provide support for these Armed Forces activities because we can bring them healthcare services directly, be it general medicine or dentistry, or specialized care for the disabled,” said Dr. Juan Héctor Jubis, a SIBASI representative. “As an institution, we always support them.” “We bring healthcare services to the entire family of disabled persons or wounded veterans, because we know that many of them have mobility problems and their families are in no position to transport them,” Col. Pérez said. last_img read more

Four Corners: Long Island Barbers

first_imgTHE BLESSED BARBERThe voices of SportsCenter mix with the whirring of buzzers at Rockabilly Barbers North in Huntington where, for eight years, Katie Pope, 30, has used children, teens and middle-aged men as her personal canvas, trimming beards, cutting hair and mastering her craft. Sporting a festive fedora and holiday-themed earrings during an interview, Pope (“like the guy with the hat,” she says) got her start after offering a free haircut to a homeless man who sneaked two $1 coins onto her workstation and mysteriously disappeared. The coins, tucked away in a jewelry box, serve as a heartwarming reminder of generosity from a man who didn’t have “a penny to his name,” she says. For her, cutting hair can be cathartic. She takes joy in lifting a person’s spirit with clippers and a razor—baptizing them with powder and rubbing alcohol. “I have a great feeling knowing he left the barber shop feeling better about himself,” she says of the homeless man.188 New York Ave., Huntington. 631-673-1750. www.rockabillybarbers.com[soundcloud url=”http://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/71726597″ params=”” width=” 100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]HIS FATHER’S SONIt’s a few minutes before 8:30 a.m. and Joseph Mazzeo is already in his Sea Cliff barber shop soaking in 19th Century classical music as a cold wind climbs over the hills of the idyllic North Shore village. Mazzeo took over his father’s shop after he passed away in 1980 and transformed the place into an antique barber shop with modest charm. His father’s death instilled in him respect for the fragility and fleeting preciousness of life, so he decided to cut his own work week to four days. “You only have so many heartbeats,” he says. Now 70, Mazzeo works—and lives—at his own pace, collecting items given by customers and friends and proudly hanging them on the wall. Mazzeo treats all his patrons the same, and that includes Academy Award-winning actress Natalie Portman, who wandered in one day in search of a mohawk. He came close to selling his small shop seven years ago, but decided to hold on. “It didn’t work out,” he says of the sale, “and I’m happy.”272 Sea Cliff Ave., Sea Cliff. 516-676-9770.[soundcloud url=”http://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/71985234″ params=”” width=” 100%” iframe=”true” /] HAIRCUTS FOR HEROESZoia Wilhelm admits that her thick Ukrainian accent has hindered her along the way since she landed in New York two decades ago. But that’s okay—the 52-year-old Glen Head resident lets her hands to the talking. For three days a week Wilhelm blissfully occupies the barber shop at the Northport Veterans Affairs Medical Center, treating her hero patients from several wars to warm shaves and well-earned haircuts. “Life is so beautiful,” she says. Wilhelm is proud of her work and believes a higher power has played a role in shaping her own life. “I believe in God, and I think it’s maybe my path here to help people,” she says. Despite the misfortunes these brave American soldiers may have weathered, she says they are thankful for all she does. Her job isn’t about the money, she says, her customer’s appreciation is her reward. “I work to make people feel better. I love to do this.”79 Middleville Rd., Northport. 631-261-4440. www.northport.va.gov. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York center_img THE STYLE ARTISTIt was a simple, yet easily answerable question posed 14 years ago to James Kiley: Would he want to flip burgers at McDonald’s or learn to style hair at a salon? The Wantagh resident considers himself an artist (even though he jokingly says he can’t draw a stick figure), and jumped on the opportunity. Now 29 and a hair stylist at Beautiful People Salon in Merrick, Kiley’s living his dream. For him, styling hair is very much an art—a client will come to him with an idea, he’ll consult, and then stylist and customer will find a happy medium. Kiley cares deeply about his work. “My biggest concern for any client I have is the integrity of the hair and making sure I don’t damage or ‘F’ it up,” he says. Judging by the amount of clients he shapes per day (15 when it’s busy), he’s doing all right. “I grew up in the field,” he says. “At 15 I ended up with a career.”145 Merrick Avenue North, Merrick. 516-341-0276.[soundcloud url=”http://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/71715645%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-h2R5l” params=”” width=” 100%” iframe=”true” /]last_img read more

Tommy DeVito’s shaky debut, other fast reactions to Syracuse’s 55-42 win at Western Michigan

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on August 31, 2018 at 10:19 pm Contact Andrew: aegraham@syr.edu | @A_E_Graham Short a quarterSyracuse looked poised to dominate the second half like it had the first. A third-quarter defensive meltdown bled a 27-point lead to six. The main victims were the secondary. After a half of inconsistent play but little duress, Western Michigan quarterback Jon Wassink started to develop a rhythm with No. 1 Broncos’ receiver D’Wayne Eskridge. Repeatedly, Eskridge outran SU corner Scoop Bradshaw and the safeties trying to help. Twice, he found the end zone.All told, Eskridge finished with eight catches for 240 yards and the two scores. After a long completion that Bradshaw managed to save the touchdown on, freshman Trill Williams replaced him as cornerback.And as WMU started to take control through the air, LeVante Bellamy started running wild. Still, with Dungey back in and a calmer fourth quarter, SU did just enough to prevail. KALAMAZOO, Mich. — The score at halftime — 34-7 — reflected the pummeling inflicted on the field. Syracuse dominated Western Michigan up front and in the run game. Starting quarterback Eric Dungey only needed to complete four passes to keep the offense well on track to earn more than 300 yards. Shortly before halftime, the lead grew to 27 and the heralded redshirt freshman Tommy DeVito took the reins.While DeVito was in, through really no fault of his own, Syracuse unraveled. An offense that opened the game with 17 points in less than seven minutes couldn’t score and the defense wilted, allowing three-straight touchdown drives in one minute or less in a single span.Eventually, Dungey came back in, and the defense recovered and the Orange escaped Waldo Stadium with a 55-42 win. Dominating the trenchesAdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse’s immediate success on Friday stemmed from the offensive line. Throughout training camp, coaches and players kept mentioning the experience of the group. Returning were Airon Servais, Cody Conway and Evan Adams. Aaron Roberts, the starting left guard on Friday, returned from an injury that cost him the 2017 season. Graduate transfer Koda Martin started previously at Texas A&M.And in the early portions of the opener, the pedigree showed. In the first half, Syracuse had seven rushes of 11 yards or more. Dungey clocked a 49-yard gash on 3rd-and-7 from his own 20 in the second quarter, SU’s longest run of the day.All told, the Orange finished with 334 rushing yards and five touchdowns on the ground.When SU did find a need to pass, the offensive line held up well. After giving up 32 sacks for 168 yards a season ago, the Orange’s big men only surrendered two on Friday for 11 yards. Both came when DeVito was in the game, and after the redshirt freshman quarterback had a chance to make his reads and scramble.Tommy DeVitoAlmost a year and a half since committing to Syracuse, Tommy DeVito finally made his debut for the Orange.Inheriting a 34-7 lead with minutes remaining in the first half, it seemed DeVito would get his looks, Syracuse would cruise to victory, and that would be that.But when DeVito came in, the offense struggled. Syracuse didn’t score during DeVito’s five drives and rarely moved the chains, save for when DeVito took a page out of Dungey’s book at takeoff.When he dropped back, DeVito looked good in the pocket, standing tall and making his reads, though occasionally taking too long and allowing for those aforementioned sacks. When he did get a chance to throw, DeVito looked confident but was often inaccurate.He sent a sideline out to Jamal Custis low and away for an incompletion. He airmailed Devin Butler multiple times on deep balls. On one of his final throws, DeVito and Butler looked to have miscommunicated and the route did not match the throw. But DeVito had bright spots, between the plays he made with his legs and a couple intermediate completions. His best pass was a wheel route to Dontae Strickland up the seam for 22 yards. Had Strickland not fell victim to a shoestring tackle, he had nothing but green grass.Eventually, Western Michigan closed the gap enough for Dungey to re-enter and put the game to rest. The redshirt freshman finished 4-for-9 for 42 yards. Commentslast_img read more