The high cost of ‘true’ diversity

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Jonathan D. FitzgeraldPosted Jul 31, 2012 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest August 8, 2012 at 3:46 am Interesting article, however, if we are talking about diversity, the voices in our church should represent all voices, even the ones we disagree with, and in some congregations I don’t see that, you are excluded if you don’t have a liberal posture, so that means that within that group there is a homogeneous dominant culture that doesn’t welcome all voices and the signs outsides of our churches are a lie (Everyone is welcome). On the other hand, our churches still have a lack of diversity in the membership, you will find mostly white Caucasian individuals (and I love dearly everyone in my congregation), but the Episcopal Church is still mostly a white church, there is only a handful of Latino churches that sometimes are seen as the weird group because they are more conservative than the rest of the church. We have a long way to go to live true diversity, respecting the lives and views of everyone, and including all ethnicities in the membership and in the clergy. Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Margaret Smist says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN August 1, 2012 at 8:34 pm Thank you ! Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Martin Garcia says: [Episcopal News Service] With the Summer Olympics underway, we’ll be hearing and reading a steady stream of stories extolling diversity. Beginning with the opening ceremony, in which athletes from each country parade around a track before taking their positions alongside fellow competitors, the games provide a visual metaphor for the way many Americans think of diversity. We dress up in costumes, act impressed by our differences and surprised by our similarities: we stand next to each other for a while — always smiling and waving — and then we go home.Those of us in the Episcopal Church, however, know that the reality is never so tidy. Diversity is difficult. It calls for acknowledging — and learning to live with — our differences. This can be messy and uncomfortable; disagreements and divisions occur regularly and we are perpetually at risk of falling apart altogether.This issue of diversity is one of the reasons that, as Ross Douthat of The New York Times recently pointed out, typically homogeneous evangelical megachurches often thrive while mainline denominations, many of which, like the Episcopal Church, have taken up the charge of diversity and inclusiveness, have seen their attendance numbers steadily decline. While no one disputes the numbers, not a lot of people seem to question whether attendance should be used as a measurement of a church’s vitality, as Douthat suggests.It should not. The Christian message is inherently countercultural. While the Gospel provides respite for people who struggle and suffer, it also challenges the status quo. The Episcopal Church, in particular, has become famous (and in some places infamous) for ruffling feathers as it strives to wider open its doors — from its active role in the struggle for civil rights in the 1960s, to its decision to ordain women in the 1970s and more recently its acceptance of LGBT persons, the church’s efforts to embody Jesus’ model of radical inclusion have each been met with resistance and strain. Over time, as these efforts have led to desertions and divisions, they have also resulted in the increasing diversity of the Episcopal Church, making it a place where those who have been denied access elsewhere are welcomed.The process of opening hearts and minds is difficult, but challenging the status quo has always been a fundamental facet of true Christianity. And, at times throughout church history, persecution and death, not sparsely populated pews, has been the consequence.I don’t worry about declining church attendance; in fact, in the parishes I’ve been a part of, I haven’t seen it. But where it is happening, let’s not assume it’s the result of failure, let alone of an attempt by the church to merely “adapt itself to contemporary liberal values,” as Douthat suggests. Rather, attribute the Episcopal Church’s declining attendance to the fact that true diversity, the kind that welcomes differences and looks for sparks of the divine in others, can feel uncomfortable at best and undesirable at worst.While for three weeks every couple of years the Olympic Games model a kind of glossy-sheen diversity, wars still rage over what seem to be irreconcilable differences that threaten to permanently rend humanity. And yet, in the midst of this strife, many find the Episcopal Church to be that rare place wherein a common faith compels us to learn to live with our differences, to become, if not at ease then at least at peace with the grey, and to model a kind of counter-cultural diversity that we believe will find its completion in Kingdom Come.— Jonathan D. Fitzgerald is a college educator and editor at Patrolmag.com. His work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Christianity Today, Religion Dispatches,The Huffington Post, Killing the Buddha, and Sojourners. He is a member of St. James’s Episcopal Church in Cambridge, Massachusetts. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA August 20, 2012 at 1:49 pm Surely Jesus would befriend homosexual people (cf. Matthew 9:10; Luke 7:34) and treat them with kindness and respect, without approving of their homosexual behavior; Jesus came preaching repentance from sin, not acceptance of sin (Matthew 4:17; Mark 1:15; Luke 5:32), and He was still calling for repentance after his ascension into heaven (Revelation 2, 3). Jesus did not come to save us in our sins, but to save us from our sins. Jesus said to the woman caught in the heterosexual sin called ”adultery”, “Go now and leave your life of sin.” (John 8:11). Jesus gave up His own life to pay the price for homosexual sins; that’s how much He hates homosexual sins and loves homosexual people (Romans 5:8). More at http://rethinkingtheology.com/category/homosexuality/ James Aist says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (3) Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The high cost of ‘true’ diversity Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed.last_img read more

Reimagining task force hears from the church

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (8) October 3, 2014 at 6:41 pm I’m not so sure, Christopher Epting! Being included in a churchwide discussion is a first, in my own experience; I thank TREC for doing that, first on their website and now with this gathering. It’s the first time anybody’s ever asked for my input on such matters.For me, these things by themselves are “re-imaginings.” (I think it might be a good idea to have discussions like this one more often, in fact; perhaps to hear more about the “re-imaginings in creative parishes and dioceses” you mention? To share ideas and learn more about one another? To talk with and listen to other members of the Anglican Communion?) Turning the battleship around is only one aspect this this, I’d say. Many thanks again to TREC for your willingness to include us, and for listening. Barbara Snyder says: Sister Mary Winifred says: Submit a Job Listing Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET (the Rev’d Dr.) Elizabeth Kaeton says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments are closed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS General Convention 2015, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR October 6, 2014 at 9:31 am One canonical change that is long past due is to redesign General Convention. Every 3 years is not only expensive, but also very counterproductive to progress, albeit some may disagree. The timing may have been appropriate in a bygone age but it is now excessive. The premise to meet so often is flawed in that the entire Church gears up to do everything from critique, lard onto structures already questionably necessary, and to meddle with faith and practice with demands from pressure groups such as Integrity. The self-imposed obligation by delegates to be profound, prophetic, and radical often brings increased tension to a Church that has decreased in membership by a further 6% in 2013. At this juncture do we really need to test the good will of the pews even further by pronouncements that have often shown them the exit doors? Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN October 13, 2014 at 11:00 am Doug is exactly right. Groups with a special agenda always try to capture the process. I felt totally misled when the Liturgy was “reformed” Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs October 4, 2014 at 11:41 am Remember, change takes time, lots of time, and we need to remember that we need to change things for the better. I’ve been a life long Episcopalian and I know its hard to change anything. Remember when we went through all trial phases of the Prayer Book. Its hard work and sometimes not appreciated, but keep up the good work. God’s Peace, M Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Doug Desper says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Earl Curtis says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Martha I. Richards says: March 21, 2015 at 6:36 pm Let us not blame it all on the gays (Integrity) or women priests. We knew a significant amount of people would leave if we did what was just, right, and fair. The extreme right of our church just went berserk and left with people, money and church buildings/property. I do feel that now that we no longer have such extreme right churches with us, we should seek reconciliation with justice. October 4, 2014 at 10:05 am Thank you, Bishop Christopher. I hope that the 40% of the elected deputies who are new to GC will understand that the resolutions coming from TREC are designed to jolt us into crucial conversations we need to have about how we are as ‘church’. I pray we don’t act precipitously. That takes real courage. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab General Convention, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL October 4, 2014 at 7:56 am Please — get editorial help with grammar! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Structure, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Reimagining task force hears from the church Group begins last face-to-face meeting before proposing structural changes Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC The Rev. Victoria Heard, canon for church planting in the Diocese of Dallas, asks a question Oct. 2 during the church-wide gathering of the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church at Washington National Cathedral. TREC member Victor Feliberty-Ruberte, of Puerto Rico, managed the floor microphone. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] After spending the evening of Oct. 2 answering questions and taking comments about its work, the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church is refining its recommendations to General Convention on structural changes to the church.TREC’s last face-to-face meeting before its report to General Convention is due began with the 2.5-hour gathering Oct. 2. The event was webcast live from Washington National Cathedral. It is also due to be available on demand for later viewing here and here. The agenda included 10-minute presentations from some TREC members each followed by 15-minute question-and-comment periods. A 40-minute question-and-comment period rounded out the meeting. Questions, concerns and comments were taken from the audience in the cathedral as well as from people sending in questions via e-mail and Twitter.The task force recently released a letter to the church outlining what it called “our thinking and emerging recommendations” on structural changes it will make to the 2015 meeting of General Convention. It said in that letter that its final report, due to be made public at the end of November, would “illustrate how these recommended changes would help The Episcopal Church to more effectively and efficiently address critical and urgent agenda items, with the flexibility to innovate and experiment more rapidly and to adopt bold courses of action where necessary.”It was not clear from comments made during the Oct. 2 gathering if the proposals included in that Sept. 4 letter will remain as they are, whether others will be added or just how sweeping a scope the final report’s recommendation will have.Diocese of North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry leads off the Oct. 2 church-wide gathering of the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church at Washington National Cathedral with a commentary on the biblical perspective on TREC’s work. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“I think for most of us, we understand that what TREC is doing is a beginning; it’s not the final product; that we are in the midst of a great transformation culturally and as a church in terms of doing the mission of Jesus in this particular mission moment,” North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry, a TREC member. “At a basic level our hope is that whatever we recommend will be in a preliminary way and the convention will wrestle with it … and we will do something that will move this movement forward.”On the other hand, the Rev. Dwight Zscheile, TREC member from Minnesota, answered a question about why the task force had not called for dramatic changes such as combining the House of Deputies and the House of Bishops or eliminating all church-wide staff by saying: “The challenge for any group, given this very large task and very short amount of time is we’ve had a lot of big, dreaming conversations and quite radical ideas and we’re still hoping to be bold.”“And we’ve also heard from a lot of you: “don’t blow things up … there’s things that are working.’ So that’s part of the discernment for us and part of the challenge … We see this as an opening up of the structures, you know, there may be ongoing reform, not just once every generation,” he added.Katy George, who convenes TREC along with the Rev. Craig Loya, told the Oct. 2 gathering that the group sees its effort as an important way to help the church work for “renewal, revival, discipleship” but she added what she called a disclaimer.“Structural reform is neither necessary nor sufficient for our church to fully live into the opportunities for discipleship that we have or to fully address the issues that we have … but, boy, it would be helpful,” she said.George and others said that TREC was considering how to streamline church-wide structures in a way that aided mission work at the local level and that gave those larger structures greater clarity in terms of their responsibilities and accountability.Jonathan Elliot, Diocese of New Jersey’s director of communication, asks members of the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church, what they will recommend about evangelizing young people like himself. Elliot got a round of applause when he announced that he was being baptized Oct. 5. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“I was actually surprised by reactions to our letter concerned about centralization of power because I think what we’re doing is actually clarifying responsibility and creating the platform for us holding our leadership and our church-wide staff accountable for specific things,” especially between meetings of General Convention when the staff and the Executive Council are responsible for carrying out convention’s mandates, she said.TREC member Dennis Sullivan added that TREC is not making any recommendations about centralization of power but rather about “how the checks and balances would be understood and followed.”George also cautioned that the debate about structure “doesn’t get in the way of keeping our church healthy and vital for our children and grandchildren.”She also noted that church-wide structures “while they seem cumbersome and big are only about two percent of our total resources of the church” and thus cutting costs is not a priority of TREC but that “better use of our resources against the things that really matter is a priority.”TREC’s work began after General Convention in July 2012, by way of Resolution C095, which called for a task force “to present the 78th General Convention with a plan for reforming the church’s structures, governance, and administration.”Of the almost 400 resolutions submitted to General Convention in 2012 more than 90 related to structural reform. Most of those resolutions were similar in nature and it was the work of the structure committee at convention to consider the legislation and make its recommendations to the house.The driving force behind those resolutions was a proposal in September 2011 by Bishop Stacy Sauls, the Episcopal Church’s chief operating officer, calling on dioceses to submit versions of a model General Convention resolution he offered asking for a special General Convention in 2014 to begin to make structural changes to the church.Some members of the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church listen Oct. 2 at Washington National Cathedral as co-convener Katy George, on monitor, speaks about the organizational perspective of TREC’s work. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceApplause and cheers erupted July 11, 2012, at General Convention as Resolution C095 sailed unanimously through the House of Bishops. A day earlier, deputies also had passed the resolution unanimously.Resolution C095 called for a “special gathering to receive responses to the proposed recommendations to be brought forward to the 78th General Convention, and shall invite to this gathering from each diocese at least a bishop, a lay deputy, a clerical deputy, and one person under the age of 35.”The Oct. 2 gathering was the only time that the task force met face-to-face with members of the church. TREC’s five meetings to date have been held almost entirely in private and the Oct. 3-4 portion of its final meeting will be closed as well.TREC has also asked for feedback from the church via its website by encouraging church groups and individuals to use its engagement kit. Those 327 responses are available here. The group also released study papers on identity and vision, Episcopal networks, and church-wide governance and administration. Those study papers are here. Each of those papers elicited responses on various social media and on various church observers’ blogs, as did TREC’s September Letter to the Church.TREC’s Facebook page is here and it is here on Twitter with @ReimagineTEC, where the group is using #reimaginetec. Tweets from during the meeting using that hashtag are here. During the meeting, many people tweeted using #TREClive. Those tweets are here.TREC also created its own website here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Rev Donald Heacock says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 3, 2014 Christopher Epting says: October 3, 2014 at 4:20 pm Oh dear friends! These are good people. They are really trying hard. But, turning around a battleship is very slow and very hard work indeed. I don’t think we should get our hopes up for “Re-Imagining The Episcopal Church” on the churchwide level. Fortunately, TEC is being re-imagined every day ‘on the ground’ in creative parishes and dioceses. That’s why Jeff Lee, Bishop of Chicago, describes his job as “lighting fires and giving permission slips!” Don’t be afraid to take risks, beloved. It’s the only way real renewal and reformation has ever taken place. Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

Prior Anders Litzell to oversee new community at Lambeth Palace

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Jeremy Heuslein says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL People Posted Nov 11, 2014 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 November 11, 2014 at 9:17 am Excited to see a fellow Wheatie and St. Barnabas parishioner in this new role! Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (1) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Archbishop of Canterbury, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Swedish Anglican priest the Rev. Anders Litzell will pioneer the Archbishop of Canterbury’s new community for young Christians at Lambeth Palace. Photo: Lambeth Palace[Lambeth Palace press release] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has appointed the Rev. Anders Litzell as prior of the Community of St. Anselm, a radical new Christian community at Lambeth Palace.Litzell, 34, is an Anglican priest from Sweden, who has experience of the Pentecostal and Lutheran traditions as well as three provinces of the Anglican Communion. He will pioneer the Community, which launches in September 2015, and direct its worship and work. He will work as prior under the auspices of the archbishop, who will be Abbot of the Community. Litzell will take up the role on Jan. 5, 2015.The Community will initially consist of 16 people living at Lambeth Palace full-time, and up to 40 people, who live and work in London, joining as non-residential members. The archbishop hopes that the Community will be definitive in shaping future leaders to serve the common good in a variety of fields, as they immerse themselves in a challenging year of rigorous formation through prayer, study, practical service and community life.Litzell was ordained in the Church of England in 2012. He is currently serving at St George’s, Holborn, in the Diocese of London, where his ministry focuses on students and adults in their 20s and 30s. At the same time he is pursuing a doctorate which focuses on the relevance of St. Benedict for contemporary leadership. He trained for ordination at Ridley Hall, Cambridge, U.K., including a sojourn at St. Agnes, Diocese of Natal in South Africa.Litzell grew up in the Swedish Pentecostal Church. During his undergraduate studies at Wheaton College, Illinois, he discovered ‘high church’ Anglicanism through St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, Glen Ellyn – where his journey to ordination began. Back in Sweden he served in the Lutheran church, Sollentuna Parish in Stockholm, while directing the Alpha Sweden office, before moving to London to work with Alpha International.Welby said: “My vision for the Community of St. Anselm is that it be both ancient and postmodern: that young adults be steeped in the rich monastic traditions of the likes of Benedict, Francis and Ignatius, while discovering their striking relevance for the transformation of self and society today. I am delighted at the appointment of Anders Litzell who will help to work this out at Lambeth Palace.”The archbishop’s chaplain, the Rev. Jo Wells, who has pioneered the setting up of the Community, said: “Anders brings an experience and hunger for spiritual formation which is both wide and deep – crossing a variety of continents and traditions. He brings much energy and imagination to the work, a work in which he will participate even as he leads.”Litzell said: “I am hugely excited about taking on this role and, through God’s grace, turning Archbishop Justin’s vision for the community into reality. We pray that the Community will be identified by prayer, by learning, by love of each other and of the poor – all with one intention above all others: to become more like Jesus.”Further information is available here. Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Anglican Communion, Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Prior Anders Litzell to oversee new community at Lambeth Palace In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

Archbishop Justin Welby reflects on Primates Meeting

first_img Submit a Job Listing Neale Adams says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Primates Meeting, Archbishop of Canterbury, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Barbara Smith-Moran says: Primates Meeting 2016 reaction In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 William A. Flint, PhD says: January 22, 2016 at 6:11 pm Maybe in some churches, Mr. Kyondo. But in TEC, scripture is not supreme, but operates along with reason and tradition to inform theology, polity, ethics, etc. Reason’s voice would say that if we err, better to err on the side of compassion, which is the Jesus way. Archbishop Justin Welby reflects on Primates Meeting Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags January 22, 2016 at 3:17 pm It was fruitful meeting in terms of the differences that Anglican communion has been experiencing over the years. TEC should reconsider the stand on their understanding of marriage and should stick on what the holy scripture says about marriage. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls January 22, 2016 at 7:01 pm It seems to me that we are all followers of Christ and we (TEC) have not departed from that. We hold that the Chicago-Lambeth Quadrilateral is the measure of unity and we did not stray from that. We have been true to our understanding of Christianity. I see no justification to say we have rewritten doctrine of our most basic and foundational beliefs. A person’s sexuality, and our understanding of the sacrament of marriage are not the basis for Christian faith and discipleship. This statement, that we have strayed from established doctrine is a ruse. The Anglican Communion in some parts of the world has longed for a way to take punitive action against TEC. I’m saddened that ABC Welby is trotting along with this disingenuous attack on TEC. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab January 21, 2016 at 2:24 pm I suppose the Archbishop and I have different ideas about what “walking together” means. To me it doesn’t mean that when you walk together with me, you can’t talk to me or have any say as to what direction which we shall take–at least not for three years. It seems to me that rather than inviting TEC to walk together with them, the Primates have said, you may walk with us, but only at the rear and several paces back. Posted Jan 21, 2016 January 27, 2016 at 1:20 am As a 22 year old college student, things like these really make me not want to be involved with organized religion in any capacity. And I know I am not alone in saying this. The Archbishop of Canterbury really ought to realize that by sanctioning TEC he is joint the African primates in supporting persecution of LGBTQ in Africa and other places. Perhaps it is time to break away from the AC so that TEC can focus on what is important in this world – making it a better place for ALL. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Primates Meeting 2016, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Jackson Kyondo says: January 21, 2016 at 12:08 pm I do remember a lecture in Church History, where the Professor stated that The Episcopal Church (TEC) after the Revolutionary War which brought us independence from the King and England stated “we shall have no bishops on foreign soil reign over us.” I think for many in TEC that is still the sentiment today. It is truly sad that politics causing so much hurt in the Body of Christ today. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC The Rev. Sylvia Vasquez says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Jeffery Maddox says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA [Lambeth Palace] The Archbishop of Canterbury has written a reflection on the meeting of Anglican Primates in Canterbury last week.Last week the Primates of the Anglican Communion gathered in Canterbury for a week of prayer and discussion. You might well have been following the events in the media. I want to share some thoughts of my own here about what took place last week – which was without doubt one of the most extraordinary weeks I have ever experienced.The first thing to say is that the week was completely rooted in prayer. The Community of St Anselm – the international young Christian community based at Lambeth Palace – took up residence in Canterbury Cathedral and prayed all day every day for the Primates as we talked together. As Primates we joined with all who gathered for Morning Prayer, Eucharist and Evensong in the Cathedral each day. And meanwhile thousands – perhaps millions – of Anglicans and others in the Christian family around the world prayed in churches and posted prayers on social media. I want to thank everyone who prayed last week. We felt it and we appreciated it deeply.***So onto what actually happened last week.As leaders of the family of Anglican churches in a world so racked by violence and fear, we gathered in Canterbury with much to share and discuss – from climate change to religiously motivated violence.A significant part of the week was spent discussing how – or even if – we could remain together as the Anglican Communion in the light of changes made by our brothers and sisters in The Episcopal Church (the historic Anglican Communion church in the USA and some other countries) to their understanding of marriage.It is really worth stressing here that this was not a meeting where we discussed formally our differing views on human sexuality. Personally the fact that people are persecuted for their sexuality is a constant source of deep sadness. As I said in the press conference on the final day of the meeting, I am deeply sorry for the pain that the church has caused LGBTI people in the past – and the present – and for the love that too often we have completely failed to show in many parts of the world, including England. The worst thing about that is that it causes people to doubt that they are loved by God.We have to see that changed. In our communiqué the Primates condemned homophobic prejudice and violence. We resolved to work together to offer pastoral care and loving service irrespective of sexual orientation. And we reaffirmed our rejection of criminal sanctions against same-sex attracted adults. We need to act on those words.But back to the response that we made about how to move forward together in the light of decisions taken by The Episcopal Church (TEC). This was a meeting where we discussed whether or not we could stay together as one family after one member has taken unilateral action – in this case, making a fundamental departure from the faith and teaching on marriage held by the large majority of Anglican Provinces globally. But the question could and undoubtedly will apply in the future to other issues. I should say that Provinces are described as autonomous (they make their own minds up) but interdependent (we are linked as family to one another).It’s no secret to say that before the meeting, the signs were not good. It really was possible that we would reach a decision to walk apart – in effect, to split the Anglican Communion. In the debates that have raged around these issues for several decades now, some have said unity is worthless if achieved at the expense of justice. Others have argued unity is a false prize if it undermines truth.Both of these views misunderstand the nature of the church, which is not an organisation but a body of people committed to each other because they are followers of Jesus Christ. We are put together as family by God, because we are all God’s children.The meeting reached a point on Wednesday where we chose quite simply to decide on this point – do we walk together at a distance, or walk apart? And what happened next went beyond everyone’s expectations. It was Spirit-led. It was a ‘God moment’. As leaders of our Anglican Communion, and more importantly as Christians, we looked at each other across our deep and complex differences – and we recognised those we saw as those with whom we are called to journey in hope towards the truth and love of Jesus Christ. It was our unanimous decision to walk together and to take responsibility for making that work.We remain committed to being together, albeit we asked that TEC, while attending and playing a full part in our meetings and all discussions, will not represent the Anglican Communion to other churches and should not be involved in standing committees for a period of three years. During this time we also asked that they not vote on matters of doctrine or how we organise ourselves.It’s clear in Christian teaching that it’s not for us to divide the body of Christ, which is the church, but also that we must seek to make decisions bearing each other in mind, taking each other seriously, loving one another despite deep differences of view.Because of that, the unity that was so remarkably shown by the Anglican Primates in Canterbury last week is always costly. It is always painful. It feels very fragile. We are a global family of churches in 165 countries, speaking over a thousand languages and living in hundreds of different cultures – how could we not wound each other as we seek to hold together amidst great diversity?There will be wounds for each other, but we must repent of wounding others who are especially vulnerable, whether they are LGBTI people or those menaced by religiously-motivated violence, terrorism and exile. Some, of course, will fall in many categories.But that unity is also joyful and astonishing, renewing and nourishing – because it is unity in love for Jesus Christ, whose single family we are, often argumentative, sometimes cruel (which is deeply wrong) but created by God and belonging to each other irrevocably.***We spent time talking about the desperate situation of so many Christians around the world living with the threat and reality of religiously-motivated violence. The primary fear for many, probably near a majority of Anglicans in the world today – just as it is for our brothers and sisters in other parts of the Christian Church and for other communities entirely – is the violence that confronts them and their families daily.It’s the risk of a Congolese woman getting raped by a militia when she goes out to fetch water. It’s the risk of church congregations in Pakistan being killed by a suicide bomber as they worship on Sunday morning. And it’s a thousand other risks besides. We heard many moving stories from around the world, shared by fellow Primates, and discussed what we can do to challenge that violence.All of us were deeply moved when the devastating effects of climate change were presented in terms of the very existence of peoples, communities and even nations. From rising sea levels, to drought and famine from the increase of unforgiving arid landscapes, the result is life-threatening for many of our brothers and sisters.So there was much darkness to lament and to recommit ourselves to challenging. But there were rays of pure, joyful hope as well. The Primates committed ourselves – all of us, in every part of the Communion – to evangelism. To proclaiming the person and work of Jesus Christ – inviting all to embrace the beauty and joy of the Gospel and to proclaim that to everyone.There will be plenty more to say on this in the coming weeks and months – certainly not just by me, but also by everyone who cares passionately about the Anglican Communion. For now I wanted to share these initial reflections with you, and ask for you to keep praying for our unity as brothers and sisters in Christ. If Christ’s flock can more or less stay together, it’s hope for a world that tears itself apart – a sign of what can happen with the love and mercy of God through Jesus Christ.***You can read the Communiqué by the Anglican Primates here. Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments (6) Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed.last_img read more

Holy Land Institute for the Deaf is a center for…

first_img By Faith Rowold with Jo KadlecekPosted Mar 31, 2016 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Middle East, Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Refugees Migration & Resettlement Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Relief & Development, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Six-year old Ibrahim is concentrating on his fingers. Legs tucked under his chair, he imitates his teacher who is showing the boy how to make words with his hands. As part of his sign language lesson, Ibrahim’s eager brown eyes bounce from teacher to book to hands and back again. He sits beside other children in a classroom filled with colors, pictures and laughter. He cannot hear them, but his enthusiasm and vision are clear.Though Ibrahim is deaf, his hope for a good education is strong here, just a few tents away from where he lives with his family in the Za’atari Refugee Camp near the Syrian border of Jordan. Most days, Ibrahim joins dozens of other children with disabilities for daily instruction at the center run by the Holy Land Institute for the Deaf (HLID) and its network of colleague agencies, which serves as both a bright social spot in the camp and as a school for children who might otherwise be overlooked.Since 2013, the Za’atari Disability Center, with support from Episcopal Relief & Development, has provided a much-needed gathering place for addressing the learning needs of children with disabilities who are also affected by the traumas of war and displacement. Some have visual impairments; others may have hearing or mental disabilities. But all receive caring guidance, instruction and friendship through HLID staff and the center’s 14 volunteers, many of whom are themselves living in the camp and looking to contribute the skills they used as teachers in Syria.It has not been easy. Since civil unrest and military hostilities escalated in Syria five years ago, an estimated 1.4 million people have accepted the hospitality of their neighbors in Jordan, with many ending  up at the Za’atari Camp. Organized by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the camp began as a fenced-off strip of desert for an initial 38,000 Syrians with limited infrastructure and services. Today, it is home to over 170,000 Syrian refugees, making it the fourth largest ‘city’ in Jordan. Dreams, careers and lives are on hold given the troubles back home, and families share tents, kitchens and toilets across the camp in the daily challenges of survival. What was always meant to be a temporary resting spot has become a static and somber place five years into the crisis.“So many families fleeing catastrophe, war and death become uninvited guests in another land, and many children with disabilities become the most vulnerable,” says HLID Director Brother Andrew L. de Carpentier, who launched the Za’atari Disability Center with support from Episcopal Relief & Development and other organizations. “Thank God for the goodness and kindness these guests meet on the way, like Mary and Joseph did in Bethlehem. Thank God that we are able to help them pick up some of the pieces of their lives and look after their children who already struggle with disabilities.”That ‘looking after” resembles a school that might be anywhere: The walls of the center are painted with Smurf characters and an array of bright colors. Building blocks, floor mats, books, tables and toys fill the classrooms. The halls are abuzz with giggles and chatter. Children, teachers and volunteers interact in a constant motion of compassionate learning, turning this makeshift structure into a happy contrast to the camp beyond.But it wasn’t always like this. Low budgets and stretched staffs in the UNHCR and other organizations working in the camp meant refugees with special needs too often were overlooked in the larger efforts. Having made it his life’s work to provide hospitality and care at the HLID, Brother Andrew grew increasingly concerned about the situation.He began to contact agency representatives. What he discovered by October 2012 was that no agencies in the Za’atari Camp offered disability programs. And if those children with hearing or visual impairments as well as physical, cognitive or neurological disabilities received no services or had no facilities, it meant their participation in everyday life and education was all the more complicated. It also meant entire families were being affected.So along with colleagues in the Network, a coalition of Jordanian disability-related organizations that HLID formed in the early 1990s, Brother Andrew and his team went to work, setting up the Za’atari Center.“At first we had caravans in the camp, but rains flooded [people’s tents] and many refugees took shelter in them,” he says. “That was really a blessing in disguise because it meant we had to go from tent to tent passing out leaflets to let them know about our services. We gained trust and built relationships that way, so that now we are known throughout the camp as the center where help is possible.”This help is an extension of the many services HLID has offered for the past 50 years. Whether fitting a child for a hearing aid, teaching sign language, providing instruction for visually impaired students or training and equipping teachers who work with other children with special needs throughout the Middle East and in Afghanistan, HLID has empowered people to engage with their realities through all of their programs, including their refugee outreach services in Za’atari Camp.That’s good news for children like Ibrahim and seven-year old Rami. Rami is hard of hearing, but here in the Za’atari Center he is learning how to speak. Wearing his championship t-shirt, he stares hard at the pictures in the book his teacher points to, and tries to say each “word” out loud: Hammer. Fruit. Sky.The word sky suddenly means more than it might otherwise. It shows how a center in a camp for Syrian refugees has become an opportunity for hope, a place where hospitality is as bright as the desert sun.Watch this video from HLID: https://youtu.be/yy8FoWqOQ3UPhotos courtesy of Holy Land Institute for the Deaf (HLID).Image Captions: Top, Smiling boy. Middle 1, Ibrahim learning sign language. Middle 2, Adults with training certificates. Middle 3, Za’atari Refugee Camp. Middle 4, Boys communicating with sign language. Middle 4, Adult sign language training class. Bottom, Rami learning how to speak. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Israel-Palestine, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Holy Land Institute for the Deaf is a center for hope for disabled children Rector Martinsville, VA Children, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

« One United People » axé sur la réinstallation des réfugiés en…

first_img« One United People » axé sur la réinstallation des réfugiés en prélude aux conférences de l’ONU Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Advocacy Peace & Justice, Episcopal Migration Ministries, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Refugees Migration & Resettlement Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries a organisé un débat intitulé «  One United People: A Dialogue on Refugee Resettlement and Faithful Welcome » en prélude aux deux sommets prévus la semaine prochaine qui traiteront des vastes mouvements de réfugiés et de migrants. Photo : Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service] Sur les 21,3 millions de refugiés dans le monde aujourd’hui, il est probable que seulement 1 % soit réinstallé. C’est une loterie à très faible probabilité.Le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés estime qu’en 2017, 1,19 million de réfugiés devront être réinstallés. La semaine prochaine, au cours d’un sommet historique des chefs d’État et de gouvernement, il sera demandé aux pays d’accueillir ces réfugiés.« En 2015, un peu plus de 100 000 réfugiés ont bénéficié d’une réinstallation », déclare le 14 septembre Karen Koning AbuZayd, conseilllère spéciale auprès de l’ONU. « Ce chiffre peut sembler satisfaisant mais maintenant il nous faut le multiplier par 10. L’écart est considérable. L’ambition est forte ».Karen Koning AbuZayd intervient lors du débat du 14 septembre intitulé « One United People: A Dialogue on Refugee Resettlement and Faithful Welcome » organisé par Episcopal Migration Ministries. Photo : Lynette WilsonKaren AbuZayd, conseillère auprès du Secrétaire général de l’ONU pour le sommet de la semaine prochaine, est intervenue devant plus de 60 personnes – des dirigeants de l’ONU, des professionnels de la réinstallation des réfugiés, d’anciens réfugiés ainsi que des sympathisants et militants – réunis le 14 septembre à l’Episcopal Church Center à New York pour « One United People: A Dialogue on Refugee Resettlement and Faithful Welcome » [Un seul peuple uni : dialogue sur la réinstallation des réfugiés et l’accueil dans la foi], un débat organisé par Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM). La conférence était diffusée par webcast et sera ultérieurement disponible en ligne ici.One United People a précédé deux conférences des Nations Unies programmées pour la semaine prochaine. Le lundi 19 septembre, l’Assemblée générale de l’ONU accueillera la première réunion des chefs d’État et de gouvernement qui traitera des grands mouvements de réfugiés et de migrants, avec pour objectif de rapprocher les pays à travers une approche plus humaine et plus coordonnée.Puis, le mardi 20 septembre, le Président Barack Obama accueillera le Leaders’ Summit on Refugees [Sommet des Dirigeants sur la question des réfugiés], co-organisé avec le Canada, l’Éthiopie, l’Allemagne, la Jordanie, le Mexique et la Suède. Lors du Sommet des Dirigeants, les gouvernements seront appelés à renforcer leurs engagements pour la réinstallation des réfugiés.« La réinstallation ne s’arrête pas lorsque le réfugié arrive dans un nouveau pays. À maints égards, c’est juste le point de départ » explique Karen AbuZayd.Ce sont les communautés de foi, particulièrement aux États-Unis, qui, ajoute-t-elle, mènent à bien le travail de réinstallation.Maher Shakir, au centre, ancien réfugié irakien, partage son expérience lors du panel du 14 septembre sur la réinstallation des réfugiés. Jay Subedi, à gauche, ancien réfugié du Bhutan, et Akram Hussein, à droite, lui aussi venu d’Irak, ont également fait part de leurs expériences. Photo : Lynette WilsonAu cours du débat, les sept membres du panel, (professionnels de la réinstallation, sympathisants et défenseurs des réfugiés et anciens réfugiés) ont fait part de leurs expériences personnelles et professionnelles. Ce que les anciens réfugiés veulent que les gens comprennent, c’est que personne ne part de chez soi sans bonne raison.« Personne ne veut partir de chez soi. La seule raison pour laquelle les gens partent de chez eux c’est parce que leur maison est en feu », affirme Abdul Saboor, ancien réfugié d’Afghanistan qui vit maintenant à Syracuse (État de New York), où il est étudiant et travaille pour InterFaith Works Center for New Americans (le centre interconfessionnel pour les nouveaux américains).Episcopal Migration Ministries, le ministère de l’église pour la réinstallation des réfugiés, collabore avec 30 correspondants dans 26 diocèses qui apportent une aide directe aux nouveaux arrivants. Le ministère propose également aux congrégations des moyens pour participer à la réinstallation des réfugiés dans leur communauté et encourage les Épiscopaliens à rejoindre le réseau Episcopal Public Policy Network et à militer en faveur de politiques qui protègent les droits des réfugiés et des demandeurs d’asile.Toutefois, le nombre de réfugiés n’est pas le seul critère. Dans le monde entier, les guerres et les persécutions ont forcé au total 65,3 millions de personnes hors de chez elles, soit quatre fois plus qu’il y a dix ans, et le record de personnes déplacées depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale.Le sommet intervient non seulement à un moment où le nombre de réfugiés atteint un chiffre record, mais également à une période de discrimination et de violence accrues à l’encontre des immigrés et des migrants. La crise des réfugiés a attisé les mouvements nationalistes à travers l’Europe, où la crainte du terrorisme et la xénophobie secouent la société et conduisent les gouvernements à prendre des mesures restrictives. La même chose est en partie vraie aux États-Unis où des États ont adopté des dispositions législatives visant à interdire les réfugiés dans leur État ou à affaiblir le programme de réinstallation du gouvernement fédéral des États-Unis.Allison Duvall, responsable des relations et de l’engagement de l’église au sein d’EMM, a animé le 14 septembre le panel où des professionnels de la réinstallation, des sympathisants et des défenseurs des réfugiés et d’anciens réfugiés ont partagé leurs expériences personnelles et professionnelles. Photo : Lynette Wilson« Nous sommes rassemblés ici aujourd’hui… en prélude et en soutien aux intentions et objectifs du sommet. Face à cette « crise de solidarité », l’Église épiscopale se mobilise pour répondre à cette crise de notre temps » déclare Allison Duvall, responsable des relations et de l’engagement de l’église au sein d’EMM. «Nous sommes solidaires des objectifs du sommet, des nations du monde qui accueillent des réfugiés, de celles qui promulguent ou développent leurs programmes de réinstallation, grâce à des communautés qui souhaitent la bienvenue à leurs nouveaux voisins par le biais de la réinstallation et, ce qui est plus important encore, nous sommes solidaires des réfugiés eux-mêmes ».Un réfugié passe en moyenne un quart de siècle dans un camp de réfugiés avant sa réinstallation ; l’UNHCR est responsable de 16,1 millions de réfugiés, dont la majorité vivent en Afrique et au Moyen-Orient. (Les autres 5,1 millions sont des réfugiés palestiniens enregistrés par l’Office de secours et de travaux des Nations Unies).L’Église épiscopale prévoit de tenir les États membres de l’ONU responsables de leur engagement et de militer en faveur du renforcement des engagements des pays pour la réinstallation des réfugiés, déclare Lacy Broemel, analyste de la politique de l’église sur la question des réfugiés et de l’immigration.Une délégation d’observateurs représentant l’Évêque Primat Michael Curry assistera au sommet le 19 septembre lorsque les États membres doivent adopter un cadre de travail global et des protocoles pour une migration sûre, ordonnée et régulière, en prélude à l’appel que feront les dirigeants aux pays afin que ceux-ci augmentent le nombre de réfugiés qu’ils réinstallent.Tandis qu’Episcopal Migration Ministries collabore avec des correspondants dans des communautés à travers tous les États-Unis, l’Église épiscopale et les Épiscopaliens défendent les droits des réfugiés au niveau national par le biais du travail effectué par son bureau des relations gouvernementales à Washington DC et du réseau Episcopal Public Policy Network.« Aux États-Unis, les Épiscopaliens font pression sur le Congrès et l’administration [du président] pour un financement renforcé permettant aux réfugiés de prospérer dans leurs nouvelles communautés et militent pour des politiques justes et humanitaires permettant d’accueillir les réfugiés et les migrants » explique Lacy Broemel, qui travaille à Washington DC. « Nous nous efforçons de sensibiliser nos voisins et amis sur les conditions auxquelles les réfugiés sont confrontés et mettons l’accent sur l’impératif moral que les réfugiés viennent aux États-Unis ».L’Église épiscopale œuvre à la réinstallation des réfugiés aux États-Unis depuis les années 1930. Episcopal Migration Ministries est l’un des neuf organismes qui travaillent en partenariat avec le Département d’État pour accueillir et réinstaller les réfugiés ; on prévoit cette année l’arrivée de 85 000 réfugiés ou nouveaux Américains.Le travail et le soutien de l’Église épiscopale aux initiatives en faveur des réfugiés s’étendent au-delà des frontières des États-Unis.Dans le Diocèse Épiscopal-Anglican d’El Salvador, Cristosal intervient dans le Triangle nord de l’Amérique Centrale pour apporter une protection d’urgence et une représentation juridique aux victimes de déplacements forcés et faciliter la réinstallation au niveau régional. La Convocation des Églises épiscopales en Europe est impliquée dans plusieurs ministères et partenariats de soutien aux réfugiés. À l’Église épiscopale de St Paul-dans-les-murs de Rome (Italie), le Centre de réfugiés Joel Nafuma offre des repas, des emplois et de la formation linguistique ainsi qu’un espace de réunion aux réfugiés, dont la plupart viennent d’Afrique et du Moyen-Orient. En France, l’Église épiscopale œuvre depuis 2007, à la réinstallation, et l’aide à l’intégration de réfugiés irakiens, et également maintenant de réfugiés syriens, par l’entremise de l’Association d’entraide aux minorités d’Orient.– Lynette Wilson est rédacteur et journaliste de l’Episcopal News Service. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing de Lynette WilsonPosted Sep 15, 2016 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

Diocese of Delaware announces bishop slate

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Episcopal News Service] The Standing Committee of the Episcopal Diocese of Delaware has announced a slate of five nominees to stand for election as the 11th bishop of the diocese.The four nominees are:The Rt. Rev. Laura J. Ahrens, bishop suffragan, Diocese of Connecticut;The Very Rev. Michael Battle, Herbert Thompson Professorial Chair of Church and Society and director of the Desmond Tutu Center at The General Theological Seminary, New York, New York;The Rev. Kevin S. Brown, rector, Episcopal Church of the Holy Comforter, Charlotte, North Carolina;The Rev. Patricia S. Downing, rector, Trinity and Old Swedes Parish, Wilmington, Delaware;  andThe Rev. Scott A. Gunn, executive director, Forward Movement, Cincinnati, Ohio.A video and more detailed information on each of the candidates can be found here.The electing convention is set for July 15. The 11th bishop will succeed the Rt. Rev. Wayne Wright, who retired in February. Until the next bishop is ordained and consecrated Dec. 9, the Standing Committee is the ecclesiastical authority in the diocese. Retired Diocese of Easton Bishop James J. “Bud” Shand, who served the Diocese of Easton, has been handling episcopal duties such as confirmations and retired Maryland Bishop Robert Ihloff will help out in the summer, according to Delaware Communications Manager Cynde BimbiWright had served the diocese since his ordination and consecration on June 20, 1998.The standing committee said that the slate is the result of an eight-month discernment process that began with the compilation of a diocesan profile. That profile began with input from more than 600 surveys and 29 town-hall meetings throughout the diocese.A petition process for submitting additional names is open until May 13th. Information about the petition process and the petition forms are available on the candidate page of the diocesan website. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC House of Bishops Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Elections, Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA By ENS staffPosted May 8, 2017 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Diocese of Delaware announces bishop slate Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

Oklahoma: A Message from Bishop Ed about Charlottesville, Virginia

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma] My Sisters and Brothers in Christ: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Charlottesville, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Racial Justice & Reconciliation Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By now, many of you have heard the news or seen the horrific acts of violence from the political demonstrations in Charlottesville, Virginia. Acts that have left one person dead and several others injured.As people of faith, we cannot let these actions occur without speaking out against the hatred, bigotry, and injustice perpetrated by those who commit these cruel and violent acts.We are a nation founded upon the principles that all people are created equal, regardless of race, gender, orientation, religious persuasion, or station in life. The violence and rhetoric witnessed today do not reflect these principles, they should be condemned in the strongest possible manner, and those responsible should be held accountable.I fear that we have lost the desire to live in community. I fear that the world has been telling us far too loudly, and for far too long, that our primary desire above all else should be promotion of self-interest. I fear that the opinion that the ends justify the means, has resulted in a common message that whatever course of action we see fit to use to accomplish our goals can be justified: dishonesty, hatred, violence, etc.My Sisters and Brothers in Christ, I write to you today to remind you that the world doesn’t have the final say! We have the ability and the power to change the trajectory in which we find our world and society. Through the teachings and example of Jesus Christ, our Savior, and with the power of the Holy Spirit, we can and will make a difference. We must not allow acts of violence, hatred, bigotry, and injustice to continue. We must speak out in love; extend a hand to our neighbor; give hope to the lost and cast aside. Together our voices can drown out the vicious rhetoric that has taken over our country; and we can create a new conversation.In the urgency of this moment, I ask your prayers for all who have been affected by today’s events. Pray for our first responders; medical personnel; victims and their loved ones; the community of Charlottesville; and all those affected by this situation. I ask you also, as our Lord Jesus Christ teaches us, to pray for those who commit these acts of injustice and violence that they may find amendment of heart, and be filled with a desire to live in the peace and love of Jesus Christ!I ask all congregations to include the Prayer for the Human Family in their worship services, and I ask you to pray with me now:O God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us through Jesus your Son: Look with compassion on the whole human family; take away the arrogance and hatred which infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us; unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in your good time, all nations and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.Faithfully,+Bishop Ed Konieczny Rector Tampa, FL Posted Aug 14, 2017 Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Oklahoma: A Message from Bishop Ed about Charlottesville, Virginia Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

Anglican archbishop in Australia speaks against euthanasia legalization

first_img [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Melbourne Philip Freier has joined six other Christian leaders in Australia from the region in calling on the state premier to reconsider plans to legalize assisted suicide and euthanasia. In a letter to Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, the Anglican, Lutheran, Catholic and Orthodox church leaders say that “human dignity is honored in living life, not in taking it.” The church leaders published their letter as an advertisement in the daily Herald-Sun newspaper.Full article. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Posted Aug 16, 2017 Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (1) Comments are closed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY August 31, 2017 at 10:39 pm The church leaders should also encourage policies that allow chronically sick people to live with dignity. Taking care of sick and/or elderly people can be daunting and it should be the goal of society to establish a system that enables people to earn sufficient to take care of their parents / grandparents and those ill while at the same time providing adequately for their children. I often hear elderly people esp in developing countries complain as to how they are neglected by their children. Unfortunately, the children have to take care of their own family and their children leaving them with little choice but to ignore the well being of their elders. Sometimes the elders wish they had a way to end their lives! Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Jawaharlal Prasad says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican archbishop in Australia speaks against euthanasia legalization The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

Vestment of murdered Archbishop Thomas Becket returns to Canterbury Cathedral

first_img Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ This 17th-century glass reliquary, which houses the vestment thought to have been worn by Archbishop Thomas Becket when he was martyred in 1170, is being loaned to Canterbury Cathedral by the Vatican. Photo courtesy: Anglican Communion News Service[Anglican Communion News Service] The tunicle that former Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Becket is thought to have been wearing when he was murdered is to return to Canterbury Cathedral for an exhibition marking the 850th anniversary of his martyrdom. Archbishop Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral on Dec. 29, 1170 by four knights of Henry II. Tradition says that they interpreted Henry’s words “Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?” as a command for him to be assassinated.The relic will go on display to mark 850 years since his death and 800 years since his remains were moved from the cathedral’s crypt into a new shrine. The tunicle is housed inside a 17th century glass reliquary which usually resides at the Papal Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome. It is being loaned to the cathedral by the Vatican for public display from July 4 to Aug. 3.Read the entire article here. Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Vestment of murdered Archbishop Thomas Becket returns to Canterbury Cathedral The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Posted Mar 16, 2020 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more