A Brief History Of LSD Ahead Of The 75th-Anniversary Bicycle Day Tour

first_imgThis year, Bicycle Day will be celebrating its 75th anniversary, and the folks at Euphonic Conceptions and Legion of Bloom Music have something really special cooked up to mark the landmark year. In years past, the two promoters have brought their psychedelic celebration to San Francisco, California, for one of the largest Bicycle Day parties in the world. However, this year, Euphonic Conception and Legion of Bloom Music’s, in honor of the standout anniversary, will take their event—featuring musicians Shpongle (Simon Posford live) and CharlestheFirst and legendary visual artists Alex and Allyson Grey—on the road.For those unfamiliar, Bicycle Day is an annual celebration of Swiss scientist Albert Hoffman’s first intentional ingestion of the chemical compound LSD-25 on April 19th, 1943, following his discovery of the compound’s mind-altering properties three days earlier. Bicycle Day takes its name from Hoffman’s trippy bike ride home, a fateful trip (in both senses of the word) whose impact still permeates both mainstream and counterculture today.After Hoffman’s discovery, psychologists clinically researched the drug throughout the 40s, 50s, and 60s, with the Swiss company Sandoz Pharmaceuticals distributing free samples of the chemical for research purposes. Alfred Hubbard read a report discussing the hallucinogenic effects of the then-obscure drug and tried it in 1951. He became known as the first true proponent for LSD outside of the research world after realizing that it could be used to explore the depths of the human psyche. He began researching and distributing the compound, eventually swapping his LSD for psilocybin, the psychoactive chemical in certain mushrooms, being studied by a Harvard psychologist, Dr. Timothy Leary.Leary went on to become the most high-profile researcher and proponent of the drug, eventually losing his position at Harvard for the controversial nature of his advocacy. He published The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead with Richard Alpert in 1964, a work that compared the nature of tripping to the spiritual experience of birth and rebirth detailed in the Tibetan tome. He advocated for students to “Turn on, tune in, and drop out,” a message that was picked up by the counterculture and perpetuated with the rising prevalence of acid parties.Ken Kesey served as a medical guinea pig testing LSD and other psychoactive drugs in the 1950’s (at the time, the CIA was also testing LSD as a weapon as part of its MKUltra program, thinking that it could be used as “truth sermon” or to incapacitate enemy forces). After publishing One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest in 1962, a book detailing his experiences during the research project, the financial success of the book allowed him to move to California, where he began hosting a series of “Acid Tests” in San Francisco along with his gang of Merry Pranksters. Enter the Grateful Dead, then known as The Warlocks, who served as the house band for these tests, during which attendees dropped acid and explored LSD’s mind-altering effects. After LSD was made illegal in 1968, there were few chemists who could successfully create the illegal compound. Owsley Stanley was one such chemist who nailed down how to synthesize the drug, serving as the supplier for Kesey’s acid tests as well as the sound technician for the Grateful Dead. With the Grateful Dead—declassified government documents reveal that the FBI cited the archetypal jam band as the country’s introduction to LSD—and other psychedelic rock juggernauts like Jimi Hendrix, Pink Floyd, The Beatles, and Jefferson Airplane at the helm of the counterculture revolution of the 60s and beyond, increasingly, the government became worried about the use of the drug, associating it with the anti-war sentiment and viewing it as a threat to American middle class, traditional values. After Dr. Sidney Cohen, a doctor who tested the psychoanalytical capabilities of the compound, testified before Congress in 1966 and declared that the drug was dangerous in the wrong hands, LSD was made illegal in 1967.While the counterculture raged on, with time the popularity of LSD subsided in the 80s, as other drugs became en vogue. However, as the turn of the new millennium approached, so did the youth’s interest in the psychedelic compound, with the drug reemerging in popularity in the 90’s and into the 2000’s through to now. Considering LSD’s rich 75-year history, its no wonder that some of the most exciting artists in modern psychedelia are gearing up for a celebration. On Bicycle Day proper, April 19th, the event will return to its home at The Midway in San Francisco, the larger venue that the event moved to last year. The following day, on April 20th—which has become a holiday for users of a different (sometimes) illegal substance—the party will move south and take over The Mayan in Los Angeles. Rounding out the weekend, the Bicycle Day tour will hit New Orleans for a performance at the Joy Theater on April 21st. Tickets for the various stops on the Bicycle Day 75th Anniversary tour are currently on sale. For the 4/19 San Francisco show, head here. For the 4/20 Los Angeles show, click here. For the 4/21 New Orleans show, head here.,For those unfamiliar, Bicycle Day is an annual celebration of Swiss scientist Albert Hoffman’s first intentional ingestion of the chemical compound LSD-25 on April 19th, 1943, following his discovery of the compound’s mind-altering properties three days earlier. Bicycle Day takes its name from Hoffman’s trippy bike ride home, a fateful trip (in both senses of the word) whose impact still permeates both mainstream and counterculture today.,Considering LSD’s rich 75-year history, its no wonder that some of the most exciting artists in modern psychedelia are gearing up for a celebration. On Bicycle Day proper, April 19th, the event will return to its home at The Midway in San Francisco, the larger venue that the event moved to last year. The following day, on April 20th—which has become a holiday for users of a different (sometimes) illegal substance—the party will move south and take over The Mayan in Los Angeles. Rounding out the weekend, the Bicycle Day tour will hit New Orleans for a performance at the Joy Theater on April 21st. Tickets for the various stops on the Bicycle Day 75th Anniversary tour are currently on sale. For the 4/19 San Francisco show, head here. For the 4/20 Los Angeles show, click here. For the 4/21 New Orleans show, head here.last_img read more

Gerrard tipped for manager success

first_img “I can only talk about the conversations I’ve had with Steven and he has never felt unhappy,” he added. “Whatever has gone on with the club and agents I haven’t been party to that but he is obviously someone we wanted to keep here. “The club offered him a deal as I still wanted Steven to be a part of what I was doing but it went on and on and at the time nothing was agreed. “The closer you get to January and you are in the last year of your contract you are not going to rush into anything. “The timeline moved on and it gave him more thinking time.” Rodgers now faces the unenviable task of filling the void Gerrard will leave behind, but he believes he will have the chance to bring in an experienced player if necessary. “It is near-on impossible to find a direct replacement for someone of that stature and quality but we have to continue with our work and find the top players to come in,” he said. “It is certainly something I know the owners look at. They know every player can’t be a young player. If you are going to keep progressing you have to do. “The model here at the football club is clear in terms of our owners who want to bring in young players and develop them into that world-class players, which is a longer and more difficult process. “The large part of our squad are here to be developed but if you are to make steps forward you have to get some ready-made ones.” “I believe Steven has an ambassadorial role here within his contract but at this moment in time there was not a coaching offer,” Rodgers said. “He has just started to take his badges and Steven is a type who is just not going to go into it blind, he is a thinker of the game, but his focus is very much on the present in terms of playing beyond this season. “When that has finished then there will be plenty of years ahead for him to coach. “If I was here as manager at that time he would be someone who would be great to have on the staff. “I genuinely believe he can offer great advice. The experience he has of Liverpool and those bits of gold dust he can give players would be invaluable to youngsters. “But coaching and management is not something you just click your finger and move into, there is a lot of commitment. “I don’t see any reason why he couldn’t be (a manager). He is a wonderful leader in the changing room.” Rodgers accepts the club may have allowed negotiations to drag on over a new deal for Gerarrd, but he rejected claims the player was upset at how things had panned out. Liverpool boss Brendan Rodgers believes Steven Gerrard has all the qualities to make a successful career in management, but the club did not offer him a coaching role as he wanted to continue playing. The Red captain, who turns 35 in May, will leave in the summer ending a 27-year association with his boyhood side. Rodgers said he would welcome Gerrard on to his coaching staff if he was still manager when the former England international finally retires, but now was not the right time to do so. Press Associationlast_img read more

Swimming and diving best UCLA

first_imgAfter consecutive losses, the USC women’s swimming and diving team bounced back in a big way, winning its final dual meet of the season.USC qualified two swimmers for the NCAA Championships and managed to break several pool and dual meet records, on its way to a 176-124 victory over UCLA.Record setter · Senior co-captain Lyndsay DePaul had arguably her best performance of the year, breaking a personal best in the 200-yard fly. – Anna Wierzbowska | Daily Trojan The temperature reached a high of 79 degrees in McDonald’s Swim Stadium on Saturday afternoon as the USC swimmers took on their crosstown rivals.No. 6 USC (9-2, 4-2) was coming off losses against Cal and Stanford, but managed to make a statement against No. 21 UCLA (9-4, 3-4).The last time the Women of Troy had nine wins in their dual meet season was in 1997, when they won the only NCAA title in team history.“[This win] really bodes well for the rest of the season,” said USC coach Dave Salo. “We did well, we put up some really good times and were in control of the meet the whole time.”Although the Bruins were successful in breaking a couple of pool records and posted fast times in several races, the Women of Troy won all but three of the day’s events.Senior Lyndsay DePaul broke her own pool record and set a new personal best in the 200-yard fly, while freshman Stina Gardell and junior Katinka Hosszu broke pool records previously held by DePaul in the 400-yard IM and 100-yard free, respectively.Gardell’s time in the 400-yard IM was recorded as third-best in the country.Sophomores Jessica Schmitt and Haley Anderson and freshman Kasey Carlson also set dual meet records in the 200-yard breaststroke, 100-yard freestyle and 100-yard breaststroke, respectively.DePaul, one of the team’s co-captains, was pleased with the results.“After our losses against Cal and Stanford the team morale was kind of low,” she said. “After seeing those times we set, we had no idea we could post those up. They definitely made a statement to us and to those who were watching.”According to Salo, the pivotal moment of the meet was not a certain record broken, but when three USC swimmers placed first, second and third in one event.“The turning point of the meet was when we went 1-2-3 in the 100 backstroke,” Salo said. “Any time you can go 1-2 [or] 1-2-3, it is a significant change of events. That really set the tone for the rest of the meet.”Overall, the team found the records set and goals that it reached in its final dual meet of the season pleasing and a bit unexpected.“We are all pretty surprised with the results,” DePaul said. “Very few of us were rested, but we worked really hard. It was exciting, it was fun and we did much better than we anticipated.”last_img read more