The Mega Festival Featuring Rolling Stones, Dylan, McCartney & More Has Been Confirmed

first_imgAfter much speculation, the new mega festival that was rumored to feature the top classic rock acts, including Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, Neil Young, The Who, Roger Waters, and The Rolling Stones, has been confirmed! Titled Desert Trip, the festival will run from October 7-9, taking place at the Empire Polo Grounds in Indio, CA, notably the same grounds as Coachella. The event is being organized by Goldenvoice, the company behind Coachella.In fact, those six artists will be the only ones performing, with the Stones and Dylan on night one, McCartney and Neil Young on night two, and Roger Waters and The Who on night three. The Desert Trip is sure to feature some of the most iconic music of a generation, with anthemic rock music performed by each and every band on this billing.You can watch a brief promotional video for the festival below:Tickets will go on sale next Monday, May 9th at 10 AM Pacific, and more information can be found here.last_img read more

Women of Troy look to get back on track in Texas

first_imgIntent on rebounding from a frustrating 1-0 season-opening loss to San Diego, the USC women’s soccer team must bear the Texas heat this weekend as it squares off against Texas Christian University and the University of Texas at Austin in two non-conference matchups.Moving on · Junior midfielder Carly Butcher looks to continue her strong play as the soccer team travels to Texas for two games this weekend. – Sundaram Kuppuswamy | Daily Trojan On Friday, the Women of Troy will kick off their road schedule against TCU (1-1); from there, they will travel farther south to face Texas (1-0) on Sunday.Despite the disheartening beginning to the season, which included being dropped unceremoniously from the top 25 rankings, the team is not dwelling on its opponents. When asked about the challenges TCU and Texas pose, coach Ali Khosroshahin turned his focus to the Women of Troy.“To be honest, the biggest challenge is ourselves,” Khosroshahin said. “Right now, the biggest challenge is the ball and ourselves.”Evident in Khosroshahin’s response was not only the frustration that accompanies an unexpected early-season loss, but also his steadfast confidence in his team.During practices, he has emphasized maintaining formation as the team progresses down the field and staying connected. And as senior striker Megan Ohai pointed out, by staying in their own lanes, the Women of Troy can stretch the field and make themselves more difficult to defend.“We weren’t doing the little things,” Ohai said. “Everyone needs to work together and get on the other side of some of these crosses.”Undoubtedly, teamwork is how the Women of Troy will generate more offense and enjoy sustained success this season.“If we don’t connect, we won’t generate anything. It’s all based on the same thing,” Khosroshahin said.In TCU and Texas, USC faces two unfamiliar opponents, both unranked and coming off of mediocre seasons. The Horned Frogs opened their season with a 3-0 loss to Texas Tech, but soon rebounded, beating Texas Southern 7-0. The Longhorns won their only game 2-1 against North Carolina State, but also beat Louisiana State by the same score in an exhibition game.last_img read more

Man to start selling ultra-rare books

first_imgPASADENA – There’s a first-edition Ken Follett thriller lying on Michael Sharpe’s library table. First editions are what Sharpe collects. This particular potboiler, however, is surrounded by what experts call one of the most extraordinary private collections of rare books in the world. In just 20 years, Sharpe has amassed works of science, philosophy, medicine, exploration, religion, literature and mathematics, all classified as being in superb condition and worth about $25 million. Together, they record the growth of Western civilization through everything from a Dead Sea Scroll fragment to “Gone With the Wind.” Selling rare books, Sharpe said, is a way to keep dealing in a world he loves. “I’m obsessive compulsive, and I’ve found a great outlet that’s socially acceptable,” he joked. Sharpe didn’t come to the rarefied world of antiquarian books through academia. A fifth-generation Californian, he left home in Calaveras County at just 15. “It was too provincial,” he said. After taking a series of manual jobs – transporting chickens and digging ditches among them – he opened his first business, private mailboxes, at 17. “I worked very hard to make a living, and in the last six or seven years my business has given me enough free time to focus on collecting books,” said Sharpe, who moved on from ditch-digging to a career in financial services. Now he has the time to go after the books he wants “with a vengeance,” spending six or seven hours a day tracking them down. With the help of rare book expert Michael Des Marais, he has accumulated a starting inventory both men expect to draw bibliophiles worldwide. “We’ve already had people from London, the East Coast, New Zealand,” said Des Marais, who manages the book store and will build up the stock through “auctions, private sales, estates and savvy book scouts” worldwide. They expect to get local customers, too – possibly from another local rare book repository. “We do have most books of the books he has,” said Alan Jutzi, curator of rare books at the Huntington Library. “But the other thing is, he has books in spectacular condition, and these are hard to come by these days,” Jutzi said. He admitted to coveting Sharpe’s copy of Lewis and Clark’s voyage, in its original boards – early books were sold with cardboard covers so owners could choose their own binding. “The Huntington does not have it like that, ours has been rebound,” he said. “(Sharpe) has books that, for their condition alone, jump out at you as looking pretty much as they did when they were printed,” Jutzi said. “Despite his short time doing it, he’s considered a major collector among collectors.” Sharpe started out with Western Americana, partly, he said, because his great-great-grandfather led a wagon train to California, and growing up in Gold Rush country, he felt “an affinity” with the West. But he soon moved on to the Holy Grail of book collecting: “Printing and the Mind of Man,” a 1963 list of 424 of the most important books in Western civilization. He has 170 of them. Sharpe loves to handle his books and show them to groups or visitors. “He had book parties at Christmas, showing fabulous rare books, and a good time was had by all,” Des Marais said. But Sharpe “doesn’t read the literature,” which includes pristine first editions of everything from “Jane Eyre,” at $125,000, to Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” at a more modest $6,000. “I get a paperback!” he said. Sharpe admits to feeling “almost romantic” about his books, and he gets passionate about some favorites: a Shakespeare Folio, a copy of “Structure of the Human Body” printed in Basel in 1543, worth $750,000, that he describes as “without question the finest in the world.” “The prices the authors paid to write some of this,” he said, gesturing to the works lining his two-story library. “It’s hard not to realize you’re sitting in the midst of history. Much of what we are today is on the shelves right here.” [email protected] (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4482160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre But now Sharpe is ready to go from book collector to bookseller. Michael Sharpe Rare & Antiquarian Books has just opened in a historic Craftsman house at 569 S. Marengo Ave., with a catalogued inventory worth around $8 million, about 20 percent of it from the personal collection kept at his Pasadena home. “It was a little bit of a wrench,” Sharpe said of shipping some of his private library off to the store. “I decided to keep history and science over literature,” he said. “I love them all, but it can take six to eight years to build up an inventory … `Frankenstein’ was hard to let go.” It’s listed at $18,500. last_img