Celebrity doctor sells Brisbane riverfront investment property

first_imgDr Ingrid Tall, owner of Cosmetic Image Clinic, has sold her Norman Park investment property. Photo: Bruce Long.FORMER Australian Medical Association Queensland boss, media identity and political aspirant Dr Ingrid Tall has sold her Norman Park investment property for a tidy $2.32 million.Dr Tall, who now runs Cosmetic Images Clinics in the Brisbane CBD, has owned the property at 8 Wynnum Rd, Norman Park, for two decades.GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HEREThis property at 8 Wynnum Rd, Norman Park, has just sold for $2.32m.The home at 8 Wynnum Rd, Norman Park, as seen from the front.The home has been snapped up by a couple of empty nesters moving from a large acreage property on Brisbane’s southside.While they might be downsizing in terms of the land and house, the buyers are certainly upsizing when it comes to views.MILLIONS CHANGE HANDS DURING HUGE AUCTION WEEKThe kitchen in the home at 8 Wynnum Rd, Norman Park.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus18 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market18 hours agoThe view from the deck at 8 Wynnum Rd, Norman Park.The four-bedroom riverfront home offers spectacular, panoramic views of the river and city.The traditional Queenslander-style house has a timeless gabled white and navy facade and retains original features such as wooden floors, VJ walls and high ceilings.BRISBANE HOUSE PRICES LEAVING SYDNEY FOR DEADInside the home at 8 Wynnum Rd, Norman Park.The property is very private, bound by only one neighbour and with Norman Creek on the other side.The house is two-storey and split into two completely separate, self-contained living zones.Sarah Hackett of Place negotiated the sale.Records show the property last sold for $822,000 in 2001.WHAT QUEENSLANDERS WANT IN A HOMEVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:29Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:29 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenChris Hemsworth’s Byron Bay mega-mansion00:29last_img read more

Munster crush Zebre

first_img Press Association Munster cruised to a sixth successive victory over Zebre to return to winning ways in the Guinness PRO12. Shortly after the break Simon Zebo added a fourth converted try and at that stage a thorough rout was on the cards, only for Munster to take their foot off the gas with the victory in the bag. Zebre did at least grab a consolation try through Oliveiro Fabiani that was converted by Luciano Orquera to ensure they avoided being blanked. The bonus-point win has lifted Munster up to second in the overall standings, a point behind new leaders Glasgow Warriors, although Ospreys can regain top spot with a win over Newport Gwent Dragons on Sunday. center_img Following a shock 24-16 defeat at provincial rivals Connacht on New Year’s Day, which included throwing away a 13-point lead, there was to be no such present for Italian side Zebre on this occasion as Munster triumphed 31-7. Felix Jones, CJ Stander and Conor Murray all scored converted first-half tries on the back of an early penalty from Ian Keatley to give Munster a 24-0 half-time lead at the Stadio XXV Aprile. last_img read more

GB let lead slip against Ireland

first_img But from that point GB lost the initiative and after Jackson’s penalty corner flick rebounded off the post, Kyle Good diverted in a cross from Mitch Darling. Ireland’s physicality threw their opponents off their stride and Jackson deservedly equalised in the 36th minute after continuing his run to the byline to volley home a loose ball. GB goalkeeper George Pinner was by far the busiest in the final two quarters, producing one brilliant save to tip a penalty corner onto the post before blocking the rebound and also palming over Conor Harte’s shot in the last minute. “It’s frustrating because in both games we’ve been ahead and they’ve come back and got draws,” said Middleton in his post-match interview. “We have a lot of games left to achieve what we want to do here. “We started well and when we went 2-0 up we just had to do a few more things a bit better. We weren’t quite as good as we can be.” GB face the tournament’s lowest-ranked side China on Thursday, while Ireland take on Malaysia in their second fixture. “Overall we’re happy with the result,” said Ireland coach Craig Fulton. “We were a bit nervous in the first quarter but settled in the second quarter and got on the scoreboard. “The second half was pleasing, we created some good phases of play which was more like us.” As in their opener against the host nation, GB let an advantage slip to leave them with two points from as many games in Antwerp, where the tournament is doubling as an Olympic qualifier. Captain Barry Middleton opened the scoring after just five minutes when his cross was deflected in by Ireland’s John Jackson before a cross-shot from Mark Gleghorn, facing brother Paul in the Irish team, was expertly deflected in by Chris Griffiths. Great Britain squandered an early two-goal lead to draw 2-2 with Ireland at the World League Semi-final in Belgium. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

ALL IN: The best player in SU history has one last shot at winning the only award she wants

first_imgBanner photo by Sam Maller | Staff Photographer john bauman May 24, 2016 at 7:51 pm Emma Comtois | Design Editor well done guys She’s about to begin her last run at an NCAA championship, starting when the No. 4-seeded Orange host either Stony Brook or Boston College in the second round of the NCAA tournament on Sunday in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. For the last three years, Syracuse and Treanor have been unable to overcome the same obstacle in the tournament’s final weekend: Maryland. And again the Terrapins are undefeated, ranked No. 1 and in Syracuse’s path in the semifinal. Treanor has one final shot to rewrite the narrative that she’s great, but can’t win on the sport’s biggest stage.It’s do-or-die at this point. If there’s a year we could do it, it’s this year. We have everything we need. It’s championship or bust.”SU assistant coach Michelle TumoloSyracuse has a veteran backline, a brick wall goalie when she’s on and one of the nation’s deepest attacks. The team’s fourth-leading goal scorer was an All-American last season. Treanor is on pace to finish with her lowest career goal total, and she couldn’t care less.Usually when she scores — as she’s done a school-record 254 times — it looks like a pregame warmup line as she nonchalantly walks away to hug her teammates.SU predicates its success on buying into the team-first culture, something everyone from her family to former teammates believes to be true about Treanor. Those close to her say it might sound like an empty cliché, but she genuinely feels indifferent about personal performance unless it helps her team succeed.“You don’t score to get on stat sheet. You score to beat a team,” Treanor said. “It’s a culture thing here. You’re a part of something way bigger than yourself. You buy into all the things the coaches say because that’s the standard.”In Treanor’s first year at Syracuse, when she switched from natural midfielder to attack, she broke the school record for goals by a freshman. A season later, she led the nation in points. In her senior year, despite seldom taking them since high school, Gait asked Treanor to be on the draw. Sam Maller | Staff Photographer One Friday night in high school, during Alyssa’s senior year, the lacrosse captains were supposed to do a fundraising bake sale at a school concert. But Alyssa missed it because of a wake, and the other captains gave her a hard time for not being there. She felt like she’d let the team down and ended up crying at the big granite-topped island in the middle of the family’s kitchen.As Alyssa got more emotional, her sister looked up from dinner.“You know what I do for my team?” Kayla said calmly. “I score goals. I don’t bake (freaking) brownies.”Her parents still laugh about the deadpan remark and her inability to see how making brownies could somehow help a team be better at lacrosse. She always had a different understanding of how to improve.She refused to sit still at a young age unless it was to watch ESPN Classic documentaries with her dad. She ran laps around the house rather than play Barbie and watch Disney movies with Alyssa. She hasn’t changed. When her computer broke during finals week two years ago, she worked out instead. It’s not uncommon for her to do four- to five-hour shooting marathons with teammates, like freshman Nicole Levy, SU’s second-leading scorer who came to SU partly because of Treanor.In one game during eighth grade, her second season playing lacrosse, Alyssa remembered Kayla’s legs buckling because she was tired from running so much. She couldn’t really move and had to lean on her stick for support. Treanor subbed herself off, re-entered a minute later and scored three goals. Three years later she played her entire junior season with a torn tendon in her left foot, according to Niskayuna coach Peter Melito. Sam Maller | Staff Photographer The attention and awards throughout her lacrosse career make Treanor uncomfortable, her mom said. She doesn’t like to be singled out. The nation’s No. 2 recruit in 2013, offered a scholarship after her first year of high school, said she didn’t know that people knew about her especially before she arrived. Or that Gait talked her up long before she got to Syracuse.“(The attention) drives her nuts,” Alyssa said. “Her whole purpose is to draw a double so she can find an open teammate. It’s always been like that with her.”When her parents compliment her specifically, even in private, she lectures them about understanding the bigger picture. When Treanor won MVP of the 2015 ACC tournament for leading SU to the championship by scoring two double-overtime game-winners in four days, she put the award in a cardboard box and hid it out of sight in her apartment. When her parents visited later, she quietly had them take it home. The box for the Syracuse team MVP award she won this season, her mother said, didn’t even get opened.That can be viewed as she has so many accomplishments that she’s egocentric about it, but that’s not the case. She’s almost embarrassed.”Janice Treanor“She’s proud of it,” her father said. “But she doesn’t want it to be a distraction. If the whole team gets a ring, she wears it proudly. If she wins an individual trophy, it goes in a box and to us.”Treanor finds herself in the same rut that’s ensnared all of SU’s best. A career-ending loss, coaches and teammates said, won’t diminish her legend because no Syracuse team or player has ever won it all. Before Treanor came Katie Rowan, Alyssa Murray and Tumolo. Before Maryland it was Northwestern that Syracuse couldn’t beat.The cycle’s only remedy is to win the national championship.For four years, on the day before she returns to Syracuse from winter break, she’s met with her trainer, Ron Greenfield. They always write down a list of goals for the upcoming season. They keep two copies, one for Treanor and the other for Greenfield. Every year, the national championship has topped the list.If Syracuse doesn’t end the season with a win, the program’s best-ever ends her career without the only award she ever wanted from the game. Now she has one last chance to capture what’s eluded her so far. And no matter how she feels about it, the attention is on her to lead Syracuse there.“I’ve never thought about it before,” Treanor said about her legacy. “… because it’s not over. I’m not done.” Emma Comtois | Design Editor Liam Sheehan | Asst. Photo Editor Published on May 11, 2016 at 9:03 pm Contact Sam: [email protected] | @Sam4TR,She’s about to begin her last run at an NCAA championship, starting when the No. 4-seeded Orange host either Stony Brook or Boston College in the second round of the NCAA tournament on Sunday in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. For the last three years, Syracuse and Treanor have been unable to overcome the same obstacle in the tournament’s final weekend: Maryland. And again the Terrapins are undefeated, ranked No. 1 and in Syracuse’s path in the semifinal. Treanor has one final shot to rewrite the narrative that she’s great, but can’t win on the sport’s biggest stage.It’s do-or-die at this point. If there’s a year we could do it, it’s this year. We have everything we need. It’s championship or bust.”SU assistant coach Michelle TumoloSyracuse has a veteran backline, a brick wall goalie when she’s on and one of the nation’s deepest attacks. The team’s fourth-leading goal scorer was an All-American last season. Treanor is on pace to finish with her lowest career goal total, and she couldn’t care less.Usually when she scores — as she’s done a school-record 254 times — it looks like a pregame warmup line as she nonchalantly walks away to hug her teammates.SU predicates its success on buying into the team-first culture, something everyone from her family to former teammates believes to be true about Treanor. Those close to her say it might sound like an empty cliché, but she genuinely feels indifferent about personal performance unless it helps her team succeed.“You don’t score to get on stat sheet. You score to beat a team,” Treanor said. “It’s a culture thing here. You’re a part of something way bigger than yourself. You buy into all the things the coaches say because that’s the standard.”In Treanor’s first year at Syracuse, when she switched from natural midfielder to attack, she broke the school record for goals by a freshman. A season later, she led the nation in points. In her senior year, despite seldom taking them since high school, Gait asked Treanor to be on the draw.,In her first game at the position, she broke the record for draw controls in a contest (19) and subsequently shattered the single-season mark (189 and counting).“We get (players) to buy in because, if you don’t, there’s no point in being here,” Tumolo said. “… They’ll believe the sky is green if we ask them to. Kayla is a fine example of that.”The entire Treanor family, including Kayla, doesn’t think she would’ve had the same success if she went to another school. Being told to trade in flip-flips for cleats was only the start. Treanor easily bought into Syracuse’s culture because she’d been sculpted by coaching philosophies all her life.It began with her father, Mark Treanor, when he cradled her in his backpack while coaching a third-grade basketball clinic on Saturday mornings. He coached three sports across two decades for Niskayuna High School. The only way the Treanor girls saw their dad, her mother Janice joked, was to go to all the games.She idolized her father, John Wooden and the work ethic it took for Bo Jackson to play two sports at once. She loved Roy Williams and read his book, “Hard Work: On and Off the Court.”She thinks hard work will take her the places she wants to go. She really believes that stuff.”Mark TreanorTreanor dragged anyone she could — family, coaches and neighbors — to the high school track where she ran sprints, did ladder drills and played endless wall ball. When Mark got home from work in the summer, he found her waiting by the door. He wanted a beer and his chair, but got lacrosse drills instead. They always started with 50 throws each, right- and left-handed.She did all this, she said, to be a dependable teammate. She didn’t know it then, but those games of catch groomed her to assume Tumolo’s position freshman year after the senior tore her ACL right before the NCAA tournament. Treanor had to play left attack, which would’ve been much more difficult if she hadn’t taught herself to be ambidextrous.“She was always out in the backyard practicing stick skills,” Ritchie Assini, her neighbor, said. “… Talking about the work ethic side of it, she was always putting in that extra minute.”,One Friday night in high school, during Alyssa’s senior year, the lacrosse captains were supposed to do a fundraising bake sale at a school concert. But Alyssa missed it because of a wake, and the other captains gave her a hard time for not being there. She felt like she’d let the team down and ended up crying at the big granite-topped island in the middle of the family’s kitchen.As Alyssa got more emotional, her sister looked up from dinner.“You know what I do for my team?” Kayla said calmly. “I score goals. I don’t bake (freaking) brownies.”Her parents still laugh about the deadpan remark and her inability to see how making brownies could somehow help a team be better at lacrosse. She always had a different understanding of how to improve.She refused to sit still at a young age unless it was to watch ESPN Classic documentaries with her dad. She ran laps around the house rather than play Barbie and watch Disney movies with Alyssa. She hasn’t changed. When her computer broke during finals week two years ago, she worked out instead. It’s not uncommon for her to do four- to five-hour shooting marathons with teammates, like freshman Nicole Levy, SU’s second-leading scorer who came to SU partly because of Treanor.In one game during eighth grade, her second season playing lacrosse, Alyssa remembered Kayla’s legs buckling because she was tired from running so much. She couldn’t really move and had to lean on her stick for support. Treanor subbed herself off, re-entered a minute later and scored three goals. Three years later she played her entire junior season with a torn tendon in her left foot, according to Niskayuna coach Peter Melito.,The attention and awards throughout her lacrosse career make Treanor uncomfortable, her mom said. She doesn’t like to be singled out. The nation’s No. 2 recruit in 2013, offered a scholarship after her first year of high school, said she didn’t know that people knew about her especially before she arrived. Or that Gait talked her up long before she got to Syracuse.“(The attention) drives her nuts,” Alyssa said. “Her whole purpose is to draw a double so she can find an open teammate. It’s always been like that with her.”When her parents compliment her specifically, even in private, she lectures them about understanding the bigger picture. When Treanor won MVP of the 2015 ACC tournament for leading SU to the championship by scoring two double-overtime game-winners in four days, she put the award in a cardboard box and hid it out of sight in her apartment. When her parents visited later, she quietly had them take it home. The box for the Syracuse team MVP award she won this season, her mother said, didn’t even get opened.That can be viewed as she has so many accomplishments that she’s egocentric about it, but that’s not the case. She’s almost embarrassed.”Janice Treanor“She’s proud of it,” her father said. “But she doesn’t want it to be a distraction. If the whole team gets a ring, she wears it proudly. If she wins an individual trophy, it goes in a box and to us.”Treanor finds herself in the same rut that’s ensnared all of SU’s best. A career-ending loss, coaches and teammates said, won’t diminish her legend because no Syracuse team or player has ever won it all. Before Treanor came Katie Rowan, Alyssa Murray and Tumolo. Before Maryland it was Northwestern that Syracuse couldn’t beat.The cycle’s only remedy is to win the national championship.For four years, on the day before she returns to Syracuse from winter break, she’s met with her trainer, Ron Greenfield. They always write down a list of goals for the upcoming season. They keep two copies, one for Treanor and the other for Greenfield. Every year, the national championship has topped the list.If Syracuse doesn’t end the season with a win, the program’s best-ever ends her career without the only award she ever wanted from the game. Now she has one last chance to capture what’s eluded her so far. And no matter how she feels about it, the attention is on her to lead Syracuse there.“I’ve never thought about it before,” Treanor said about her legacy. “… because it’s not over. I’m not done.”,Banner photo by Sam Maller | Staff Photographer,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment. Kayla Treanor wore flip-flops. And Gary Gait didn’t like it.While working a summer camp on the grass field by Manley Field House, SU’s head coach thought Treanor’s footwear showed a lackadaisical effort. At the end of her freshman season weeks prior, Treanor posted a team-leading six points against an All-American senior defender in an 11-10 Final Four loss to Maryland. But that didn’t matter.The culture of Gait’s program was built on the bedrock of non-stop intensity, regardless of circumstance. Gait pulled Treanor aside for a conversation. About seriousness. About leadership. About how the younger girls looked up to the older ones in orange jerseys, just like she had four years earlier.“Gary’s word is God to Kayla,” her sister, Alyssa said. “Whatever (her coaches) say, that’s the law.”Treanor called her parents and said she was thankful Gait said something. The coaches were the biggest reason she’d chosen SU over North Carolina after a long deliberation. The next day, she wore cleats.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDuring the Niskayuna, New York, native’s time at Syracuse, she switched positions, bought into Gait’s mindset and will soon leave the program as the most accomplished player in its history. She’s a three-time Tewaaraton Award finalist, broke the record for program goals and became the first to win three consecutive Atlantic Coast Conference Offensive Player of the Year awards.But the player who’s won almost everything still doesn’t have the one thing she came to college to get. Comments In her first game at the position, she broke the record for draw controls in a contest (19) and subsequently shattered the single-season mark (189 and counting).“We get (players) to buy in because, if you don’t, there’s no point in being here,” Tumolo said. “… They’ll believe the sky is green if we ask them to. Kayla is a fine example of that.”The entire Treanor family, including Kayla, doesn’t think she would’ve had the same success if she went to another school. Being told to trade in flip-flips for cleats was only the start. Treanor easily bought into Syracuse’s culture because she’d been sculpted by coaching philosophies all her life.It began with her father, Mark Treanor, when he cradled her in his backpack while coaching a third-grade basketball clinic on Saturday mornings. He coached three sports across two decades for Niskayuna High School. The only way the Treanor girls saw their dad, her mother Janice joked, was to go to all the games.She idolized her father, John Wooden and the work ethic it took for Bo Jackson to play two sports at once. She loved Roy Williams and read his book, “Hard Work: On and Off the Court.”She thinks hard work will take her the places she wants to go. She really believes that stuff.”Mark TreanorTreanor dragged anyone she could — family, coaches and neighbors — to the high school track where she ran sprints, did ladder drills and played endless wall ball. When Mark got home from work in the summer, he found her waiting by the door. He wanted a beer and his chair, but got lacrosse drills instead. They always started with 50 throws each, right- and left-handed.She did all this, she said, to be a dependable teammate. She didn’t know it then, but those games of catch groomed her to assume Tumolo’s position freshman year after the senior tore her ACL right before the NCAA tournament. Treanor had to play left attack, which would’ve been much more difficult if she hadn’t taught herself to be ambidextrous.“She was always out in the backyard practicing stick skills,” Ritchie Assini, her neighbor, said. “… Talking about the work ethic side of it, she was always putting in that extra minute.”last_img read more