Medeski Martin & Wood Are Working On Their First Studio Album As A Trio Since 2009

first_imgWhile musicians John Medeski, Billy Martin and Chris Wood are all virtuosos in their own right, there’s something magical that happens when the trio get together as Medeski Martin & Wood. The group has been together now for 25 years, capturing the jazz and jam worlds by storm with their otherworldly approach to music.In recent years, all three members have been immersed in various projects. Wood tours regularly with The Wood Brothers, while Medeski has found roles in DRKWAV, Phil Lesh & Friends, The Word and many more groups. Just recently, he was announced as a member of Saudade, a new supergroup with members of Deftones, Bad Brains and more. Listen to their debut track here.Of course, MMW is at the very heart of it all. The band’s latest release was Juice, a collaborative work with jazz guitarist John Scofield. While that was the band’s most recent studio project, there’s definitely a different energy when the band has Scofield in tow, as compared to their work as a trio. For the last MMW studio release, we have to look back to the group’s Radiolarian Series, which consisted of three albums released from 2008-2009. The band released a handful of live albums since then, including one with Wilco’s Nels Cline, but today we’ve learned that the band is back in the studio.Check out this update from Billy Martin below:We’re very excited too! We’ll be sure to update once we know more. Until then, you can get down to some 2016 MMW with video footage of their three sets at the moe.-hosted Tropical throe.down festival from earlier this year.last_img read more

Underfunding no argument for assisted dying

first_imgNewsRoom 23 July 2020Family First Comment: Superb article from palliative care specialist Dr Sinead Donnelly…“Every week as doctors we see cases where disabled, sick or mentally ill patients will, at their most vulnerable point, contemplate suicide. With the right care and medicine the vast majority are brought out of this vulnerable state to a place of health. Under the proposed Act, those same people could be dead within 72 hours.As doctors caring for people who are dying every day we know the difference that this legislation will make to vulnerable people. It will expose the vulnerable to the extraordinary burden of a duty to die. We are voting no and we invite you to join us in opposing this Act.”Arguing for assisted dying legislation on the basis NZ’s palliative care is underfunded is like saying that the car needs a clean so should be pushed off a cliff, writes Dr Sinéad DonnellyIn recent weeks there have been unsubstantiated claims in New Zealand media by pro-euthanasia, retired doctors or ‘veteran medical specialists’ around the End of Life Choice Act, which will be voted on during the upcoming referendum.As specialist doctors trained in palliative medicine and currently practising in New Zealand, we’re extremely concerned at their argument in favour of euthanasia. It’s wrong and it’s dangerous.First, they argue in favour of euthanasia because, in their words, palliative care has been “underfunded from the start and access and quality are patchy”. They say that aged residential staff “are overworked and often poorly trained in palliative care for the dying”. In other words, they want us to vote at the referendum in favour of euthanasia due to inadequacy and inequity of palliative care and inadequate aged residential care staffing.This is a little like arguing that the car needs a clean so should be pushed off a cliff.When have we, as a society, agreed to prematurely end the lives of patients due to poor funding? In any other situation that would be called callous and unacceptable. It certainly doesn’t pass the kindness test.The second irresponsible statement is that “the End of Life Choice Act is one of the safest in the world”. It is not. The Act’s claimed protection against pressure from “another person” is poorly drafted and provides inadequate levels of protection to vulnerable New Zealanders. For example, the Act requires only one doctor (the first doctor to whom a request for euthanasia or assisted suicide is made) to only “do his or her best” to ensure that person requesting euthanasia has expressed their wish “free from pressure” by “any other person”.The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners, the very doctors who are also going to be on the front line of the process, told Parliament they won’t be able to detect coercion or pressure in all cases with this test, and that there will be wrongful deaths under this law. To wit:“The College … considers clause (h) where the medical practitioner is required to ‘do his or her best to ensure that the person expresses his or her wish free from pressure’ is problematic. As one member wrote: ‘It will prove impossible to determine if a patient is ‘free from coercion’. What criteria will doctors use to determine whether or not coercion exists? If patients request assisted death, there is no provision in the Bill as to what a doctor should do if she or he thinks that coercion is actually present. Coercion of patients will be impossible to discern in every request for assisted death. Doctors will not be 100 percent correct in their assessments of coercion. Wrongful deaths will be the result of this proposed new law.’”READ MORE: https://www.newsroom.co.nz/underfunding-no-argument-for-assisted-dyinglast_img read more

Cats and Tribesmen do battle

first_img4pm is the start-time and it’s preceded by the Leinster minor hurling final – Dublin take on Kilkenny in that one.There’s also one hurling qualifier match this afternoon as Limerick travel to Mullingar to take on Westmeath at 2. This fixture in 2012 will bring back happy memories for Galway fans as they ran out 10-point winners against Brian Cody’s men.The Cats have claimed two All-Ireland titles since then, though, and come into this game on the back of a 24-point win against Wexford.Former Kilkenny player Michael Walsh says that Galway are a different animal though this year.last_img