Inner City

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PG&E pleads guilty to 84 counts of involuntary manslaughter in California wildfire

first_imgSome fire victims are expected to receive payouts under PG&E’s bankruptcy reorganization plan.PG&E and its utility unit filed for bankruptcy in January 2019, citing more than $30 billion in potential liabilities from California wildfires in 2017 and 2018 linked to its equipment.The company previously reached $25.5 billion of settlements related to wildfires in 2015, 2017 and 2018, including $13.5 billion for victims and $12 billion for insurers, cities, counties and other public entities.Under the settlement with Newsom, PG&E agreed to pay no shareholder dividends for three years, saving about $4 billion, and pursue a “rate-neutral” $7.5 billion financing package that would benefit rate payers. “I am here today on behalf of the 23,000 men and women of PG&E, to accept responsibility for the fire here that took so many lives and changed these communities forever,” Johnson said in a written statement.The Camp Fire killed at least 84 people and destroyed some 18,000 buildings. It is considered the most destructive wildfire in California history.PG&E’s plea deal was reached in March, ending a major roadblock for the utility to emerging from Chapter 11 bankruptcy. It came after the utility accepted tighter oversight and pledged billions of dollars to improve safety and help wildfire victims under an agreement with California Governor Gavin Newsom.Under the agreement, PG&E would pay a maximum $3.5 million fine plus $500,000 in costs, and up to $15 million to provide water to residents after the fire destroyed the utility’s Miocene Canal. Topics :center_img Pacific Gas & Electric pleaded guilty on Tuesday to 84 counts of involuntary manslaughter stemming from a devastating 2018 wildfire in Northern California touched off by the utility company’s power lines.The guilty plea, part of an agreement with prosecutors in Butte County, is intended to end all criminal proceedings against PG&E from the Camp Fire, which broke out on Nov. 8, 2018, and destroyed much of the town of Paradise.Bill Johnson, the company’s chief executive officer, entered the plea during a hearing in Butte County Superior Court.last_img read more

Jamaica’s Tourism Minister to visit North America/Europe on SOE fallout

first_imgTourism Minister Edmund Bartlett is to visit North America and Europe this weekend as Jamaica moves to quell any fallout from its decision to impose a state of emergency in St. James, where the island’s tourist resort of Montego Bay is situated.Bartlett told a news conference that the authorities have already developed “a comprehensive program with our partners” from the three major markets, including the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.nsure future bookingsHe said from this weekend he would be moving to “cover those markets to meet with all our partners and to ensure future bookings, because I think that the winter (booking) is holding and that’s the message we want to have.”He said the concerns for the authorities here would be future bookings adding “we want to look to make sure that we shore up the summer and the fall because we are pushing to inch into the five million arrivals this year.”The government introduced the state of emergency last week Thursday in a bid to deal with the rising criminal activities including murder in that parish. Last year, more than 300 people were killed in St. James and the authorities have said more than 200 people including those wanted for murder have been detained under the state of emergency.Jamaica is being made saferBartlett said that Jamaica would continue its aggressive public relations campaign noting “we are out there, and we are making the point that Jamaica is being made safer”Earlier Prime Minister Andrew Holness told reporters that he is “prepared to do what it takes to address this crime problem” and warned ‘all of what we are doing is threatened by the security situation in Jamaica.”He said crime is but one aspect of the island’s security and his administration was also concerned about its ability to protect and control its borders, telecommunication and financial services among other sectors.He dismissed the notion that the state of emergency is all about dealing with the crime “in our faces, the murders, and the public disorder” adding “it is also to deal with what I like to call an eco-system of criminality at an enterprise level.last_img read more